Bebiankh

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Seuserenre Bebiankh was a native ancient Egyptian king of the 16th Theban Dynasty during the Second Intermediate Period and, according to Kim Ryholt, the successor of king Semenre. He is assigned a reign of 12 years in the Turin Canon (11.8). [1]
Bebiankh was succeeded either by a poorly known king named Sekhemre Shedwast or by the equally shadowy ruler Seneferankhre Pepi III. [2]

Attestations

Bebiankh is principally known by a stela [3] found at Gebel Zeit that attests to mining activity conducted in this area by the Red Sea during his reign and preserves his royal names Seuserenre and Bebiankh. [4] The modest stela records this king's activities in the Gebel Zeit galena mines. [5] He is also known to have built an extension to the Temple of Medamud. [6] Bebiankh's nomen was also found on a bronze dagger found in Naqada and now in the British Museum, under the catalog number BM EA 66062. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Kim Ryholt, The Political Situation in Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period c.1800-1550 B.C, Museum Tusculanum Press, (1997), p. 202
  2. Wolfgang Helck, Eberhard Otto, Wolfhart Westendorf, Stele - Zypresse: Volume 6 of Lexikon der Ägyptologie, Otto Harrassowitz Verlag, 1986, Page 1383
  3. Georges Castel & Georges Soukiassian: Dépôt de stèles dans le sanctuaire du Nouvel Empire au Gebel Zeit, BIFAO 85 (1985), ISSN 0255-0962, pp. 291-92, pl. 64
  4. Ryholt, pp. 159-60
  5. Janine Bourriau, "The Second Intermediate Period (c.1650-1550 BC)" in Ian Shaw (ed.) The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt, Oxford University Press, 2000. p.205
  6. "XVIIth Dynasty". Archived from the original on 2014-02-01. Retrieved 2007-08-15.
Preceded by
Semenre
Pharaoh of Egypt
Sixteenth Dynasty of Egypt
Succeeded by
Sekhemre Shedwast