Thomas Symonds House

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Thomas Symonds House
ReadingMA ThomasSymondsHouse.jpg
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Location Reading, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°32′25″N71°5′22″W / 42.54028°N 71.08944°W / 42.54028; -71.08944 Coordinates: 42°32′25″N71°5′22″W / 42.54028°N 71.08944°W / 42.54028; -71.08944
Built 1785
Architect Bancroft, Daniel
Architectural style Federal
MPS Reading MRA
NRHP reference #

84002833

[1]
Added to NRHP July 19, 1984

The Thomas Symonds House is a historic house at 320 Haverhill Street in Reading, Massachusetts. Built sometime between 1775 and 1836 by Thomas Symonds, Jr., it is the only Federal period brick-ended house in the town, and is unusually architecturally sophisticated for the period in the town. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. [1]

Reading, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Reading is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States, 16 miles (26 km) north of central Boston. The population was 24,747 at the 2010 census.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

The Symonds House is set opposite Symonds Way on the west side of Haverhill Street, one of Reading's oldest north-south roads, and an early settlement area. Facing south, it is a large 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, with a hip roof and four interior chimneys. Its end walls are brick, and the front and rear walls are finished in clapboards. Its front door surround is a conjectured 20th century replacement for an earlier surround. The entry on the north side has narrow pilasters, and is topped by a four-pane transom and an entablature with an elaborate cornice. [2]

The house was built sometime between 1783 and 1836 by Thomas Symonds, Jr., whose father had made by 1750 accumulated significant land in the area. The relatively high Federal style of the house is unusual for Reading, and may have been the result of the influence of Salem builder Samuel McIntire, who was related to Symonds (also a Salem native) by marriage. The use of brick was probably a fashion statement, since Symonds owned a local sawmill, and lumber was readily available. [2] The property now houses a hospice facility.

Salem, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Salem is a historic coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, located in the North Shore region. It is a New England bedrock of history and is considered one of the most significant seaports in Puritan American history.

Samuel McIntire American architect

Samuel McIntire was an American architect and craftsman, best known for the Chestnut Street District, a classic example of Federal style architecture. Born in Salem, Massachusetts to housewright Joseph McIntire and Sarah (Ruck), he was a woodcarver by trade who grew into the practice of architecture. He married Elizabeth Field on October 10, 1778, and had one son. He built a simple home and workshop on Summer Street in 1786.

See also

This is a list of properties and historic districts in Reading, Massachusetts, that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This is within Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Middlesex County, Massachusetts Wikimedia list article

This is a listing of places in Middlesex County in the U.S. state of Massachusetts that are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. With more than 1,300 listings, the county has more listings than any other county in the United States.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 "NRHP nomination for Thomas Symonds House". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-02-15.