Thompson Site

Last updated
Thompson Site
USA Kentucky location map.svg
Archaeological site icon (red).svg
Approximate location within Kentucky today
Location South Portsmouth, Kentucky,  Greenup County, Kentucky, Flag of the United States.svg  USA
Region Greenup County, Kentucky
Coordinates 38°43′25.39″N83°1′8.72″W / 38.7237194°N 83.0190889°W / 38.7237194; -83.0190889
History
Founded 1100 CE
Abandoned 1200 CE
Periods Croghan Phase
Cultures Fort Ancient culture

The Thompson Site is a Fort Ancient culture archaeological site located near South Portsmouth in Greenup County, Kentucky, next to the Ohio River across from the mouth of the Scioto River. It was occupied during the Croghan Phase (1100 to 1200 CE) of the local chronology and was a contemporary of Baum Phase sites in the Scioto River valley. [1]

Archaeological site Place in which evidence of past activity is preserved

An archaeological site is a place in which evidence of past activity is preserved, and which has been, or may be, investigated using the discipline of archaeology and represents a part of the archaeological record. Sites may range from those with few or no remains visible above ground, to buildings and other structures still in use.

South Portsmouth, Kentucky Unincorporated community in Kentucky, United States

South Portsmouth is an unincorporated community in Greenup County, Kentucky, United States. South Portsmouth is located on the Ohio River across from Portsmouth, Ohio and 3 miles (4.8 km) west of South Shore, Kentucky. Kentucky Route 8 passes through the community.

Greenup County, Kentucky County in the United States

Greenup County is a county located along the Ohio River in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,910. The county was founded in 1803 and named in honor of Christopher Greenup. Its county seat is Greenup.

See also

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References

  1. Sharp, William E. (1996). "Chapter 6:Fort Ancient Farmers". In Lewis, R. Barry. Kentucky Archaeology. University Press of Kentucky. pp. 162–166. ISBN   0-8131-1907-3.