Thornby, Northamptonshire

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Thornby
Northamptonshire UK location map.svg
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Thornby
Thornby shown within Northamptonshire
Population 189 (2011)
OS grid reference SP6775
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Northampton
Postcode district NN6
Dialling code 01604
Police Northamptonshire
Fire Northamptonshire
Ambulance East Midlands
EU Parliament East Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Northamptonshire
52°22′24″N1°00′36″W / 52.3734°N 1.0101°W / 52.3734; -1.0101 Coordinates: 52°22′24″N1°00′36″W / 52.3734°N 1.0101°W / 52.3734; -1.0101

Thornby is a village and civil parish in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England. It has a Manor house. At the time of the 2001 census, the parish's population was 162 people, [1] increasing to 189 at the 2011 Census. [2] The village is bisected by the A5199 (formerly A50) road between Northampton and Leicester and about 11 miles (17.7 km) north-west of Northampton town centre. It is about 1½ miles (2½ km) south of a junction with the A14 road which joins the M1 Motorway and M6 junction at Catthorpe with Felixstowe, Suffolk.

Northamptonshire County of England

Northamptonshire, archaically known as the County of Northampton, is a county in the East Midlands of England. In 2015 it had a population of 723,000. The county is administered by Northamptonshire County Council and by seven non-metropolitan district councils. It is known as "The Rose of the Shires".

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Manor house country house that historically formed the administrative centre of a manor

A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry.

Contents

Notable buildings

The parish church is dedicated to St. Helen and is described by Pevsner as of little architectural interest. It dates from the 14th century and additions and re-building took place in 1870 by E F Law. [3]

Edmund Francis Law British architect

Edmund Francis Law, usually referred to as 'E. F. Law', FRIBA was a British architect during the 19th century, notable for a large number of projects, particularly restorations, in the counties of Northamptonshire, Leicestershire and Rutland.

Thornby Hall is located off Naseby road and carries 17th century, with 19th- and 20th-century additions, for its Tudor style. The house and grounds were used as a school for young people with severe emotional and behavioural problems, as a result of attachment difficulties which may have been rooted in early life trauma. It is now closed and been sold. [4] In 2017, Thornby Hall became home to Nagarjuna Kadampa Meditation Centre, a Kadampa Buddhist community and public meditation centre.

Naseby village in the United Kingdom

Naseby is a village in the District of Daventry in Northamptonshire, England. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 Census was 687.

Tudor architecture architectural style

The Tudor architectural style is the final development of Medieval architecture in England, during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, and also the tentative introduction of Renaissance architecture to England. It is generally not used to refer to the whole period of the Tudor dynasty (1485–1603), but to the style used in buildings of some prestige in the period roughly between 1500 and 1560. It followed the Late Gothic Perpendicular style and was superseded by Elizabethan architecture from about 1560 in domestic building of any pretensions to fashion. In the much more slow-moving styles of vernacular architecture "Tudor" has become a designation for styles like half-timbering that characterize the few buildings surviving from before 1485 and others from the Stuart period. In this form the Tudor style long retained its hold on English taste. Nevertheless, 'Tudor style' is an awkward style-designation, with its implied suggestions of continuity through the period of the Tudor dynasty and the misleading impression that there was a style break at the accession of Stuart James I in 1603.

Stone House is c. 1700 and Thornby Grange was built in 1911 in the Stuart style. [3]

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References

  1. Office for National Statistics: Thornby CP: Parish headcounts. Retrieved 24 November 2009
  2. "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 10 July 2016.
  3. 1 2 Pevsner, Nikolaus; Cherry, Bridget (revision) (1961). The Buildings of England Northamptonshire. London and New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 426–427. ISBN   978-0-300-09632-3.
  4. Thornby Hall at Childhood First website - has pictures of the Hall and grounds. Accessed 31 January 2013

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Thornby, Northamptonshire at Wikimedia Commons