Thornton Ward Estate

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Thornton Ward Estate
Thornton Ward Estate.jpg
Front of the farmhouse
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Location1387 U.S. Route 40
Nearest city Toledo, Illinois
Coordinates 39°13′40″N88°12′51″W / 39.22778°N 88.21417°W / 39.22778; -88.21417 Coordinates: 39°13′40″N88°12′51″W / 39.22778°N 88.21417°W / 39.22778; -88.21417
Area10.6 acres (4.3 ha)
Built1875
Architectural style Italianate
NRHP reference No. 01001308 [1]
Added to NRHPDecember 4, 2001

Thornton Ward Estate is a historic rural estate located at 1387 U.S. Route 40 south-southeast of Toledo, Illinois. The main building on the estate, an Italianate house, was constructed circa 1875 by the Ward family. The two-story brick home has a symmetrical front with two windows on each story on either side of the entry. The entrance features a double door topped by an arched transom; a single panel door is located directly above the entrance on the second floor. The home's hipped roof features a small gable above the entrance and is topped by a widow's walk. The estate also includes a section of the original National Road. [2]

The estate was added to the National Register of Historic Places on December 4, 2001. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  2. John Harrison Ward II (March 23, 2001). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Ward, Thornton, Estate" (PDF). National Park Service . Retrieved December 21, 2013.