Thymidine diphosphate

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Thymidine diphosphate
DTDP chemical structure.png
Thymidine diphosphate anion 3D spacefill.png
Names
IUPAC names
[(2R,3S,5R)-3-hydroxy-
5-(5-methyl-2,4-dioxopyrimidin-
1-yl)oxolan-2-yl]methyl phosphono hydrogen phosphate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
PubChem CID
Properties
C10H16N2O11P2
Molar mass 402.19
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Thymidine diphosphate (TDP) or deoxythymidine diphosphate (dTDP) (also thymidine pyrophosphate, dTPP) is a nucleotide diphosphate. It is an ester of pyrophosphoric acid with the nucleoside thymidine. dTDP consists of the pyrophosphate group, the pentose sugar ribose, and the nucleobase thymine. Unlike the other deoxyribonucleotides, thymidine diphosphate does not always contain the "deoxy" prefix in its name. [1]

Contents

See also

Related Research Articles

Nucleoside glycosylamine that can be thought of as nucleotide without a phosphate group

Nucleosides are glycosylamines that can be thought of as nucleotides without a phosphate group. A nucleoside consists simply of a nucleobase and a five-carbon sugar ribose whereas a nucleotide is composed of a nucleobase, a five-carbon sugar, and one or more phosphate groups. In a nucleoside, the anomeric carbon is linked through a glycosidic bond to the N9 of a purine or the N1 of a pyrimidine. Examples of nucleosides include cytidine, uridine, adenosine, guanosine, thymidine and inosine.

Thymidine Chemical compound

Thymidine is a pyrimidine deoxynucleoside. Deoxythymidine is the DNA nucleoside T, which pairs with deoxyadenosine (A) in double-stranded DNA. In cell biology it is used to synchronize the cells in G1/early S phase.

Pyrophosphate salt or ester of diphosphoric acid

In chemistry, pyrophosphates are phosphorus oxyanions that contain two phosphorus atoms in a P-O-P linkage. A number of pyrophosphate salts exist, such as Na2H2P2O7. Often pyrophosphates are called diphosphates. The parent pyrophosphates are derived from partial or complete neutralization of pyrophosphoric acid. Important salts include disodium pyrophosphate and tetrasodium pyrophosphate. The pyrophosphate bond, as found in ATP, is very important in biochemistry.

Guanosine diphosphate chemical compound

Guanosine diphosphate, abbreviated GDP, is a nucleoside diphosphate. It is an ester of pyrophosphoric acid with the nucleoside guanosine. GDP consists of a pyrophosphate group, a pentose sugar ribose, and the nucleobase guanine.

TDP or tdp may refer to:

A salvage pathway is a pathway in which nucleotides are synthesized from intermediates in the degradative pathway for nucleotides.

Uridine diphosphate chemical compound

Uridine diphosphate, abbreviated UDP, is a nucleotide diphosphate. It is an ester of pyrophosphoric acid with the nucleoside uridine. UDP consists of the pyrophosphate group, the pentose sugar ribose, and the nucleobase uracil.

Cytidine diphosphate chemical compound

Cytidine diphosphate, abbreviated CDP, is a nucleoside diphosphate. It is an ester of pyrophosphoric acid with the nucleoside cytidine. CDP consists of the pyrophosphate group, the pentose sugar ribose, and the nucleobase cytosine.

Nucleoside-diphosphate kinase class of enzymes

Nucleoside-diphosphate kinases are enzymes that catalyze the exchange of terminal phosphate between different nucleoside diphosphates (NDP) and triphosphates (NTP) in a reversible manner to produce nucleotide triphosphates. Many NDP serve as acceptor while NTP are donors of phosphate group. The general reaction via ping-pong mechanism is as follows: XDP + YTP ←→ XTP + YDP. NDPK activities maintain an equilibrium between the concentrations of different nucleoside triphosphates such as, for example, when guanosine triphosphate (GTP) produced in the citric acid (Krebs) cycle is converted to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Other activities include cell proliferation, differentiation and development, signal transduction, G protein-coupled receptor, endocytosis, and gene expression.

Nucleic acid metabolism

Nucleic acid metabolism is the process by which nucleic acids are synthesized and degraded. Nucleic acids are polymers of nucleotides. Nucleotide synthesis is an anabolic mechanism generally involving the chemical reaction of phosphate, pentose sugar, and a nitrogenous base. Destruction of nucleic acid is a catabolic reaction. Additionally, parts of the nucleotides or nucleobases can be salvaged to recreate new nucleotides. Both synthesis and degradation reactions require enzymes to facilitate the event. Defects or deficiencies in these enzymes can lead to a variety of diseases.

Uridine diphosphate glucose chemical compound

Uridine diphosphate glucose is a nucleotide sugar. It is involved in glycosyltransferase reactions in metabolism.

In enzymology, a dTDP-4-dehydrorhamnose reductase (EC 1.1.1.133) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a dTDP-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.46) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Nucleoside-diphosphatase group of proteins having nucleoside-diphosphatase activity

In enzymology, a nucleoside-diphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.6) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a nucleoside-triphosphate diphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.19) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a dTDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-D-glucose transaminase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a dTDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxygalactose transaminase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a galactose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase class of enzymes

In enzymology, a glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Thymidine diphosphate glucose chemical compound

Thymidine diphosphate glucose is a nucleotide-linked sugar consisting of deoxythymidine diphosphate linked to glucose. It is the starting compound for the syntheses of many deoxysugars.

References

  1. Coghill, Anne M.; Garson, Lorrin R., eds. (2006). The ACS style guide: effective communication of scientific diphosphates information (3rd ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Chemical Society. p.  244. ISBN   978-0-8412-3999-9.