Tiran Porter

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Tiran Porter
Tiran Porter.JPG
Porter with The Doobie Brothers in 1974.
Background information
Birth nameTiran Calvin Porter
Born (1948-09-26) September 26, 1948 (age 75)
Los Angeles, California
United States
Genres Rock
Occupation(s) Musician
Instrument(s) Bass guitar, guitar, vocals
Labels Warner Bros. Records

Tiran Calvin Porter (born September 26, 1948) is an American bass and guitar player, vocalist and composer, best known as a member of The Doobie Brothers from 1972 to 1980 and 1987 to 1992.

Contents

Biography

Early life

Born in Los Angeles, California, Porter graduated from Leuzinger High School in Lawndale, California in 1966. Was playing in LA in a garage band called Six Penny Opera when he got the call to come up and play with the Doobie Bros. [1]

The Doobie Brothers

He rose to fame as a member of the Doobie Brothers, replacing bassist Dave Shogren on their second album Toulouse Street in 1972. [2]

His vocals were mostly restricted to the background in the studio, although he wrote and sang "For Someone Special" (a tribute to ill bandleader Tom Johnston) on the album Takin' It To The Streets (1976) and the creatively syncopated "Need A Lady" on the album Livin' On The Fault Line (1977). In concert, Porter usually performed lead vocals on one or two songs.[ citation needed ]

Porter left the Doobies in 1980, citing frustration with the hectic and constant touring schedule. His replacement was session man Willie Weeks, later famous for his collaboration with Michael Jackson and other Quincy Jones protégés. After guesting onstage with his former bandmates briefly during the 1982 farewell tour, he rejoined the Doobies in 1987. Porter played on Cycles (1989), whose title was taken from an unused song he wrote, [3] and Brotherhood (1991). Neither album featured a Porter composition or lead vocal, and his bass is often buried in the mix. After five years of touring in support of Cycles and Brotherhood, Porter finally quit the Doobies for good in 1992. He was reportedly still frustrated with constant touring and the band's preference for recording familiar sounding material instead of his own, more diverse compositions.

Porter released a self-produced solo album, Playing to an Empty House, in 1995. It is a mix of rock, progressive, and jazz spotlighting Porter on all of the instruments and vocals. The album features jazz solos and little or no bass guitar, focusing instead on lead guitar and sequenced keyboards.

More recently, Porter played bass with singer-songwriter Keith Greeninger from Santa Cruz, California, Beatles tribute band White Album Ensemble, [4] Stormin' Norman and the Cyclones, [5] and Moby Grape during its occasional reunions.[ citation needed ]

In 2020, Porter was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of The Doobie Brothers. [6]

Playing technique

Porter's most notable contributions to the Doobie Brothers' sound were his busy and punchy bass lines; his distinctive tone permeates all of the band's classic compositions and hits.

His early technique, with rich chordal attack, was based mostly on his picking style, favoring the guitar pick over fingerstyle playing. The hit title track from Takin' It to the Streets , which prominently features Porter's thundering, picked notes, is a prime example of this technique. More recently, even performing the old repertoire with the Doobies, Porter has been playing new, custom-made instruments almost exclusively finger style. [7]

Equipment

Often pictured with a Alembic or Gibson basses during the seventies (usually with a Thunderbird or Ripper bass and earlier with an EB-0L), Porter played Fender instruments, most notably the Fender Jazz Bass, along with BC Rich Eagles and Rickenbackers.[ citation needed ]

Albums

Solo

With the Doobie Brothers (incomplete)

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References

  1. As a kid I used to watch them practice.
  2. Aronie, Dan - "Makin Music - Tiran Porter" on YouTube GuitarShowCase; accessed December 31, 2015.
  3. Liner notes from Playing To An Empty House
  4. http://www.whitealbumlive.com White Album Ensemble
  5. http://mars-studios.com/StorminNorman Stormin' Norman and the Cyclones
  6. "The Doobie Brothers | Rock & Roll Hall of Fame". www.rockhall.com. Retrieved 15 January 2020.
  7. Fox, Brian. ""Tiran Porter On Rollin' With The Doobie Brothers"". Archived from the original on April 27, 2009. Retrieved 2010-08-12.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)Bass Player Magazine; accessed December 31, 2015.