Turkey national under-20 football team

Last updated
Turkey Under-20
Association Turkish Football Federation
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Feyyaz Uçar
FIFA code TUR
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First colours
Kit left arm tur10h.png
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Kit body turkey2010 away.png
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Second colours
FIFA U-20 World Cup
Appearances 3 (first in 1993 )
Best result Round of 16, 2005, 2013

The Turkey national under-20 football team is the national under-20 football team of Turkey and is controlled by the Turkish Football Federation. The team competes in the FIFA U-20 World Cup, which is held every two years. To qualify for this tournament (which is held in odd years), the team must finish in the top six of the UEFA European Under-19 Football Championship from the previous year (unless acting as host).

Turkish Football Federation sports governing body

The Turkish Football Federation Turkish: Türkiye Futbol Federasyonu; TFF) is the governing body of association football in Turkey. It was formed on 23 April 1923, and joined FIFA the same year and UEFA in 1962. It organizes the Turkish national teams, the Turkish Football League and the Turkish Cup.

The FIFA U-20 World Cup is the biennial football world championship for male players under the age of 20, organised by FIFA. The competition has been staged every two years since the first tournament in 1977 held in Tunisia. Until 2005 it was known as the FIFA World Youth Championship.

Contents

Competitive record

FIFA World Youth Championship/U-20 World Cup Record

YearResultGPWD*LGSGA
Flag of Tunisia.svg 1977 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Japan.svg 1979
Flag of Australia.svg 1981
Flag of Mexico.svg 1983
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg 1985
Flag of Chile.svg 1987
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 1989
Flag of Portugal.svg 1991
Flag of Australia.svg 1993 Group stage301218
Flag of Qatar.svg 1995 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Malaysia.svg 1997
Flag of Nigeria.svg 1999
Flag of Argentina.svg 2001
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg 2003
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2005 Round of 16411247
Flag of Canada.svg 2007 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Egypt.svg 2009
Flag of Colombia.svg 2011
Flag of Turkey.svg 2013 Round of 16420266
Flag of New Zealand.svg 2015 Did Not Qualify
Flag of South Korea.svg 2017
Flag of Poland.svg 2019
Total3/22113261121
*Red border colour indicates tournament was held on home soil.

1993 FIFA World Youth Championship

Group C

TeamPtsPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of England.svg  England 5321031+2
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3311183+5
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 33030440
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 13012187
South Korea  Flag of South Korea.svg11Flag of England.svg  England
Watson 32' (o.g.) (Report) Pearce 82'
Olympic Park Stadium, Melbourne
Attendance: 15,732
Referee: Hellmut Krug (Germany)

Turkey  Flag of Turkey.svg06Flag of the United States.svg  United States
(Report) Baba 22'
Joseph 26', 72'
Faklaris 28', 46', 90'
Olympic Park Stadium, Melbourne
Attendance: 15,732
Referee: Jorge Nieves (Uruguay)

England  Flag of England.svg10Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Bart-Williams 69' (Report)
Olympic Park Stadium, Melbourne
Attendance: 9,274
Referee: Jorge Nieves (Uruguay)

South Korea  Flag of South Korea.svg11Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
Cho 48' (Report) Reçber 85'

England  Flag of England.svg10Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
Joachim 12' (Report)
Olympic Park Stadium, Melbourne
Attendance: 12,972
Referee: Jorge Nieves (Uruguay)

South Korea  Flag of South Korea.svg22Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Lee 39', 52' (Report) Kelly 37'
Zavagnin 78'
Olympic Park Stadium, Melbourne
Attendance: 12,972
Referee: Hellmut Krug (Germany)

2005 FIFA World Youth Championship

Group B

TeamPtsPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 9330094+5
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 4311176+1
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 43111440
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 0300328−6
Turkey  Flag of Turkey.svg1–2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Gökhan Soccerball shade.svg 84' (Report) Tan Wangsong Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Zhao Xuri Soccerball shade.svg 90+5'
Galgenwaard Stadion, Utrecht
Attendance: 10,000
Referee: Eric Braamhaar (Netherlands)

Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg3–1Flag of Panama.svg  Panama
Aliev Soccerball shade.svg 20' (pen.), 22'
Feschuk Soccerball shade.svg 32'
(Report) Arzhanov Soccerball shade.svg 26' (o.g.)

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg3–2Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Zhu Ting Soccerball shade.svg 31'
Chen Tao Soccerball shade.svg 66' (pen.)
Cui Peng Soccerball shade.svg 75'
(Report) Vorobei Soccerball shade.svg 19'
Aliev Soccerball shade.svg 70' (pen.)

Panama  Flag of Panama.svg0–1Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
(Report) Gökhan Soccerball shade.svg 24'
Galgenwaard Stadion, Utrecht
Attendance: 6,100
Referee: Jorge Larrionda (Uruguay)

Turkey  Flag of Turkey.svg2–2Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Sezer Soccerball shade.svg 8' (pen.), 53' (Report) Aliev Soccerball shade.svg 5', 19'
De Vijverberg, Doetinchem
Attendance: 9,500
Referee: Luis Medina Cantalejo (Spain)

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg4–1Flag of Panama.svg  Panama
Zhou Haibin Soccerball shade.svg 6'
Gao Lin Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Hao Junmin Soccerball shade.svg 51'
Lu Lin Soccerball shade.svg 78'
(Report) Venegas Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Galgenwaard Stadion, Utrecht
Attendance: 4,000
Referee: Essam Abd El Fatah (Egypt)

Current squad

2018 Toulon Tournament

The 2018 Toulon Tournament was the 46th edition of the Toulon Tournament. It was held in the region of Provence from 26 May to 9 June 2018.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
1 GK Muhammed Şengezer (1997-01-05) 5 January 1997 (age 21)30 Flag of Turkey.svg Bursaspor
1 GK Altay Bayındır (1998-04-14) 14 April 1998 (age 20)10 Flag of Turkey.svg Ankaragücü

2 DF Adil Demirbağ (1997-12-10) 10 December 1997 (age 20)30 Flag of Turkey.svg Adana Demirspor
2 DF Fatih Aksoy (1997-11-06) 6 November 1997 (age 20)20 Flag of Turkey.svg Beşiktaş
2 DF Gökhan Kardeş (1997-05-15) 15 May 1997 (age 21)40 Flag of Romania.svg Juventus Bucureşti
2 DF Savaş Polat (1997-04-14) 14 April 1997 (age 21)40 Flag of Turkey.svg Anadolu Selçukspor
2 DF Tuncer Duhan Aksu (1997-09-11) 11 September 1997 (age 21)10 Flag of Turkey.svg İstanbulspor
2 DF Abdürrahim Dursun (1998-12-01) 1 December 1998 (age 19)30 Flag of Turkey.svg Trabzonspor
2 DF Merih Demiral (1998-03-05) 5 March 1998 (age 20)40 Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP B

3 MF Atakan Çankaya (1998-06-25) 25 June 1998 (age 20)30 Flag of Turkey.svg Altay
3 MF Barış Alıcı (1997-06-24) 24 June 1997 (age 21)41 Flag of Turkey.svg Altınordu
3 MF Harun Alpsoy (1997-03-03) 3 March 1997 (age 21)30 Flag of Turkey.svg Antalyaspor
3 MF Eslem Öztürk (1997-12-01) 1 December 1997 (age 20)40 Flag of Turkey.svg İstanbulspor
3 MF Furgan Polat (1997-01-21) 21 January 1997 (age 21)10 Flag of Turkey.svg Eskişehirspor
3 MF Alican Özfesli (1997-01-01) 1 January 1997 (age 21)40 Flag of Turkey.svg Altınordu
3 MF Muhammed Enes Durmuş (1997-01-08) 8 January 1997 (age 21)30 Flag of Turkey.svg Göztepe
3 MF Mustafa Eskihellaç (1997-05-05) 5 May 1997 (age 21)30 Flag of Turkey.svg Yeni Malatyaspor
3 MF Ahmet Canbaz (1998-04-27) 27 April 1998 (age 20)20 Flag of Germany.svg Braunschweig

4 FW Kubilay Kanatsızkuş (1997-03-28) 28 March 1997 (age 21)42 Flag of Turkey.svg Bursaspor
4 FW Mücahit Can Akçay (1998-04-13) 13 April 1998 (age 20)42 Flag of Turkey.svg Anadolu Selçukspor

Past squads

See also

Turkey national football team mens national association football team representing Turkey

The Turkey national football team represents Turkey in association football and is controlled by the Turkish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Turkey. They are affiliated with UEFA.

Turkey's national Under-21 football team, also known as Turkey Under-21s or Turkey U-21s, is the Under-21 years of age team of the Turkey national football team.

The Turkey national under-19 football team is the national under-19 football team of Turkey and is controlled by the Turkish Football Federation. The team competes in the UEFA European Under-19 Football Championship, held every year. The Under-19 UEFA tournament originally began as the FIFA Junior Tournament between 1948-54. It has since been renamed a number of times, most notably referred to as the UEFA European U-18 Championship between 1981-2001. The tournament was renamed as the UEFA European U-19 Championship in 2002, but importantly the overall statistics are collated from 1948. In addition, every even year, the top five teams from the respective UEFA European Under-19 Football Championship compete in the FIFA U-20 World Cup the following year.

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References