Vanuatu white-eye

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Vanuatu white-eye
Vanuatuwhiteeye.jpg
Vanuatu white-eye on Aore Island, Vanuatu
Naturalis Biodiversity Center - RMNH.AVES.133433 1 - Zosterops flavifrons efatensis Mayr, 1937 - Zosteropidae - bird skin specimen.jpeg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Zosteropidae
Genus: Zosterops
Species:
Z. flavifrons
Binomial name
Zosterops flavifrons
(Gmelin, 1789)

The Vanuatu white-eye or yellow-fronted white-eye (Zosterops flavifrons) is a small passerine bird belonging to the genus Zosterops in the white-eye family Zosteropidae. It is endemic to Vanuatu, where it is one of the most common birds.

It is 11–12 cm (4.3–4.7 in) long. The adult male is yellow-green above while the underparts are bright yellow or yellow-green depending on the subspecies. The forehead is yellow and there is a white ring around the eye. The legs and feet are dark grey and the bill is brown above and pinkish below. Female and immature birds are similar to the male but paler. The immatures also have a narrower eye-ring.

The contact call is short and high-pitched. The song is a repeated warbling.

There are seven subspecies distributed almost throughout Vanuatu from the Banks Islands in the north to Aneityum in the south. The species occurs in a variety of habitats including forest, plantations and gardens from sea level to the mountains. It forages in bushes and trees, moving around in pairs or small flocks. The varied diet includes insects, nectar and fruit such as lantana berries and wild figs.

The neat, cup-shaped nest is built 2.5 m (8 ft 2 in) or more above the ground and is made of grass, pieces of bark and spider webs. The eggs are bluish-white and there are three in a clutch.

Related Research Articles

<i>Zosterops</i> genus of birds

Zosterops is a genus of passerine birds containing the typical white-eyes in the white-eye family Zosteropidae. The genus has the largest number of species in the white-eye family. They occur in the Afrotropical, Indomalayan, and Australasian realms. Typical white-eyes have a length of between 8 and 15 cm. Their most characteristic feature is a conspicuous white feather ring around the eye, though some species lack it. The species in this group vary in the structural adaptations of the tongue. The Zosterops [griseotinctus] group is an example of a "great speciator" inhabiting a vast area and showing a remarkable morphological differentiation on islands, some of which maybe as close as 2 km (1.2 mi) apart.

Silvereye

The silvereye or wax-eye is a very small omnivorous passerine bird of the south-west Pacific. In Australia and New Zealand its common name is sometimes white-eye, but this name is more commonly used to refer to all members of the genus Zosterops, or the entire family Zosteropidae.

Indian white-eye Species of bird

The Indian white-eye, formerly the Oriental white-eye, is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. It is a resident breeder in open woodland on the Indian subcontinent. They forage in small groups, feeding on nectar and small insects. They are easily identified by the distinctive white eye-ring and overall yellowish upperparts. The range previously extended eastwards to Southeast Asia, Indonesia and Malaysia but when the taxa in these regions were assigned to other species, the English name was changed.

Sri Lanka white-eye

The Sri Lanka white-eye is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. It is a resident breeder in forests, gardens and plantations which is endemic to Sri Lanka, mainly in the highlands.

Warbling white-eye Species of bird

The warbling white-eye, also known as the Japanese white-eye and mountain white-eye, is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. The specific epithet is occasionally written japonica, but this is incorrect due to the gender of the genus. Its native range includes much of east Asia, including the Russian Far East, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, and the Philippines. It has been intentionally introduced to other parts of the world as a pet and as pest control, with mixed results. As one of the native species of the Japanese islands, it has been depicted in Japanese art on numerous occasions, and historically was kept as a cage bird.

Mauritius olive white-eye

The Mauritius olive white-eye is a very rare passerine from the family of white-eyes (Zosteropidae). It is endemic to the island of Mauritius.

Marianne white-eye

The Marianne white-eye, also known as Seychelles chestnut-sided white-eye or Seychelles yellow white-eye, is an extinct species of small bird in the white-eye family.

Yellow-fronted parrot

The yellow-fronted parrot is a parrot endemic to the Ethiopian Highlands. It is a mostly green with a yellow head. Relatively little is known about this bird.

Cape white-eye

The Cape white-eye is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. It is native to southern Africa.

Pale-bellied white-eye

The pale-bellied white-eye is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It is endemic to SE Sulawesi in Indonesia. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest. The species has a limited distribution and also appears to be sensitive to human disturbance.

The Bismarck white-eye or black-headed white-eye is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It is endemic to the Bismarck Archipelago in Papua New Guinea, where it occurs in New Britain, New Ireland and a number of smaller islands. It is sometimes considered to be the same species as the black-fronted white-eye of the mainland of New Guinea. The species is found in forests, forest edges, secondary forest, gardens and plantations, generally in hill and mountain areas and more rarely down to sea level.

Solomons white-eye

The Solomons white-eye or New Georgia white-eye is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It is endemic to the New Georgia Islands in the Solomon Islands. It is also known as Zosterops rendovae but this name properly refers to the grey-throated white-eye.

Canary white-eye

The canary white-eye or yellow white-eye is a species of white-eye endemic to northern Australia in subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. Its common name reflects the circle of white feathers around its eye.

Grey-throated white-eye

The grey-throated white-eye is a species of bird. Its family, the Zosteropidae, is probably not valid and belongs in the Timaliidae instead. It is also known as Zosterops ugiensis because Z. rendovae has often been used for the Solomons white-eye.

Northern yellow white-eye

The northern yellow white-eye, formerly the African yellow white-eye, is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It is found across sub-Saharan Africa, from Senegal in the west across to southern Sudan in the east and south to northern Angola.

Robust white-eye

The robust white-eye, also known as the Lord Howe white-eye or robust silvereye, and locally as the "big grinnell", was a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It was endemic to the lowland forests of Lord Howe Island, east of Australia.

Green-backed white-eye

The green-backed white-eye is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It is also known as the New Caledonian white-eye. It is endemic to New Caledonia.

The Seram white-eye is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. It is an endemic resident breeder in open woodland in Seram, Indonesia.

Togian white-eye

The Togian white-eye is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae.

Eye-ring

The eye-ring of a bird is a ring of tiny feathers that surrounds the orbital ring, a ring of bare skin immediately surrounding a bird's eye. The eye-ring is often decorative, and its colour may contrast with adjoining plumage. The ring of feathers is sometimes incomplete, forming an eye arc. In the absence of a conspicuous eye-ring, the orbital ring of a bird is often referred to as the eye-ring. The bare orbital ring may be hardened or fleshy, or may form an eye-wattle. These are useful field marks in many bird species, and the eye-ringed flatbill, eye-ringed tody-tyrant and eye-ringed thistletail are examples of species named for either of these.

References

  1. BirdLife International (2012). "Zosterops flavifrons". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2012. Retrieved 26 November 2013.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)