Waterville Bridge

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Waterville Bridge
Waterville Bridge in Swatara State Park HAER 462-14.jpg
USA Pennsylvania location map.svg
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Location Appalachian Trail over Swatara Creek, Swatara Gap, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°28′49″N76°31′55″W / 40.48028°N 76.53194°W / 40.48028; -76.53194 Coordinates: 40°28′49″N76°31′55″W / 40.48028°N 76.53194°W / 40.48028; -76.53194
Area less than one acre
Built 1890
Architect Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Architectural style Lenticular truss
MPS Highway Bridges Owned by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Transportation TR
NRHP reference # 88002171 [1]
Added to NRHP November 14, 1988

The Waterville Bridge is a lenticular truss bridge designed and manufactured by the Berlin Iron Bridge Co.. It was built in 1890.

The Berlin Iron Bridge Company was a Berlin, Connecticut company that built iron bridges and buildings that were supported by iron. It is credited as the architect of numerous bridges and buildings now listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. It eventually became part of the American Bridge Company.

It was relocated from Waterville, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, to Swatara State Park in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, in 1985. [2]

Lycoming County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Lycoming County is a county located in the U.S. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 116,111. Its county seat is Williamsport.

Swatara State Park

Swatara State Park is a 3,515-acre (1,422 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Bethel, Swatara and Union Townships, Lebanon and Pine Grove Township, Schuylkill Counties in Pennsylvania in the United States. 8 miles (13 km) of Swatara Creek lie within the park's boundaries, which are roughly formed by Pennsylvania Route 443 to the north and Interstate 81 to the south. The park is in a valley in the ridge and valley region of Pennsylvania between Second Mountain (north) and Blue Mountain (south).

Lebanon County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

LebanonCounty is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 133,568. Its county seat is Lebanon. The county was formed from portions of Dauphin and Lancaster counties in 1813, with minor boundary revisions in 1814 and 1821. Lebanon County comprises the Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Harrisburg-York-Lebanon, Pennsylvania Combined Statistical Area. Lebanon is 72 miles northwest of Philadelphia, which is the nearest major city.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

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