Waterville Main Street Historic District

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Waterville Main Street Historic District
Waterville, ME City Hall (2014) IMG 2652.JPG
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Location Roughly Main and Common Sts., Castonguay Sq.; also 129-179 Main & 13 Appleton Sts., Waterville, Maine
Coordinates 44°32′58″N69°37′47″W / 44.54944°N 69.62972°W / 44.54944; -69.62972 Coordinates: 44°32′58″N69°37′47″W / 44.54944°N 69.62972°W / 44.54944; -69.62972
Area 5.9 acres (2.4 ha)
Built 1897 (1897)
NRHP reference # 12001066 [1]  (original)
16000675  (increase)
Significant dates
Added to NRHP December 19, 2012
Boundary increase September 27, 2016

The Waterville Main Street Historic District encompasses the best-preserved portions of the historical commercial downtown area of Waterville, Maine. Developed most intensively in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this area was the center of commerce for Waterville and the surrounding rural communities. It encompasses 25 properties on Main and Common Streets, including the Waterville Opera House and City Hall. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012, and was slightly enlarged in 2016. [1]

Waterville, Maine City in Maine, United States

Waterville is a city in Kennebec County, Maine, United States, on the west bank of the Kennebec River. The city is home to Colby College and Thomas College. As of the 2010 census the population was 15,722, and in 2017 the estimated population was 16,600. Along with Augusta, Waterville is one of the principal cities of the Augusta-Waterville, ME Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Waterville Opera House and City Hall theater and former town hall in Waterville, Maine, United States

The Waterville Opera House and City Hall is a historic civic building at Castonguay Square in downtown Waterville, Maine. Built at the turn of the 20th century, it is one of a small number of multifunction civic buildings, housing both a live performance venue and municipal facilities, functions it continues to perform today. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

The downtown area of Waterville is located on the west bank of the Kennebec River, about 20 miles (32 km) upstream from the city of Augusta, the river's highest point navigable by ocean-going vessels. Waterville developed as an industrial center in the second half of the 19th century, following the arrival of the railroad in 1849. Mills were built south of the downtown area, and residential areas grew to the north and west. The city's most rapid period of growth was between about 1890 and 1920, when many of the brick commercial buildings lining Main Street were built. Castonguay Square, a grassy park on the north side of Common Street and south of City Hall, was laid out in 1796, when the area was still part of Winslow. It is named for a soldier killed during World War I, and features a German cannon from that war, as well as a commemorative marker of Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec, which took place during the American Revolutionary War, when this area was largely undeveloped. [2]

Kennebec River river in Maine, United States

The Kennebec River is a 170-mile-long (270 km) river within the U.S. state of Maine.

Augusta, Maine Capital of Maine, United States

Augusta is the state capital of the U.S. state of Maine and the county seat of Kennebec County.

Winslow, Maine Town in Maine, United States

Winslow is a town and census-designated place in Kennebec County, Maine, United States, along the Kennebec River. The population was 7,794 at the 2010 census.

The district includes two blocks of Main Street, between Temple and Spring Streets, as well as Common Street and Castonguay Square. Most of the buildings in this area are commercial brick buildings, and most have fairly typical Late Victorian commercial styling. The Opera House and City Hall, a single building on the north side of Castonguay Square at the corner of Front Street, is a fine example of Colonial Revival architecture, and continues to serve the community as an entertainment venue and municipal center. The Krutzky Block, located at the southeast corner of Common and Main, is a distinctive small block with Spanish Revival and Arts and Crafts elements. The 1936 Federal Trust Company building (25-33 Main) is the district's only example of Art Deco architecture. The district's oldest building is the 1836 Ticonic Row (8-22 Main), which exhibits Greek Revival features overlaid by alterations made in the 1920s. [2]

Art Deco Influential visual arts design style which first appeared in France during the 1920s

Art Deco, sometimes referred to as Deco, is a style of visual arts, architecture and design that first appeared in France just before World War I. Art Deco influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theatres, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners. It took its name, short for Arts Décoratifs, from the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes held in Paris in 1925. It combined modern styles with fine craftsmanship and rich materials. During its heyday, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Kennebec County, Maine Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Kennebec County, Maine.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 Corbett, Matthew; Hanson, Scott (2012). NRHP nomination for Waterville Main Street Historic District; available by request from the Maine Historic Preservation Commission