Zipper Catches Skin

Last updated
Zipper Catches Skin
Aczipper.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedAugust 25, 1982
RecordedMid-1982 at Cherokee Studios, CA
Genre Hard rock, pop punk, post-punk, new wave
Length32:25
Label Warner Bros.
Producer Alice Cooper and Erik Scott;
"I Am the Future" Steve Tyrell
Alice Cooper chronology
Special Forces
(1981)
Zipper Catches Skin
(1982)
DaDa
(1983)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [1]

Zipper Catches Skin is the seventh solo album by Alice Cooper, released in 1982.

Album collection of recorded music, words, sounds

An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a collection on compact disc (CD), vinyl, audio tape, or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century as individual 78-rpm records collected in a bound book resembling a photograph album; this format evolved after 1948 into single vinyl LP records played at ​33 13 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format widely used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s.

Alice Cooper American rock singer, songwriter and musician

Alice Cooper is an American singer, songwriter, and actor whose career spans over 50 years. With his distinctive raspy voice and a stage show that features guillotines, electric chairs, fake blood, deadly snakes, baby dolls, and dueling swords, Cooper is considered by music journalists and peers alike to be "The Godfather of Shock Rock". He has drawn equally from horror films, vaudeville, and garage rock to pioneer a macabre and theatrical brand of rock designed to shock people.

This is a list of notable events in music from 1982, a year in which Madonna made her debut and Michael Jackson released Thriller, which still holds the title for the world's best selling album.

Contents

Album background

Co-produced by Cooper and his bassist at the time, Erik Scott, Zipper Catches Skin is musically known for its dry and energetic hard rock style, with pop punk and post-punk influences and less emphasis on hard riffs, carrying on a similar musical direction of the preceding Special Forces with sonically slicker and clearer results. Lyrically, Cooper employed a much stronger focus on comical sarcasm and on avoiding using clichéd subject matter. Erik Scott has stated the album “was meant to be lean, stripped down, and low on frills. Punkish and bratty.” [2] However, although it saw the return of guitarist Dick Wagner to Cooper's band, Zipper is generally not considered to be up to the same standard as his previous works.

Erik Scott American musician

Erik Scott is an American bass guitar player, producer, and songwriter. Scott played bass for the band Flo & Eddie in the 1970s as well as Alice Cooper in the early 1980s, for whom he also produced. In the 1990s he was one of the founding members of Sonia Dada, which reached the number one position on the Australian music charts with their debut album. Scott was also the co-writer of the song Father, Father, which was the title track for the Pops Staples' album of the same name, winner of the 1994 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album. In 2008 he became a solo artist as well, with his debut album Other Planets. He has recorded four solo albums in total, including the 2016 ZMR Awards Album of the Year winner In the Company of Clouds.

Hard rock is a loosely defined subgenre of rock music that began in the mid-1960s, with the garage, psychedelic and blues rock movements. It is typified by a heavy use of aggressive vocals, distorted electric guitars, bass guitar, drums, and often accompanied with keyboards.

Pop punk is a genre of rock music that combines influences of pop music with punk rock. Fast tempos, prominent electric guitars with distortion, and power chord changes are typically played under pop-influenced melodies and vocal styles with lighthearted lyrical themes including boredom and teenage romance.

At the time, Cooper described Zipper Catches Skin as “totally kill. Real hardcore. The stuff that I do has always been a lot like that. In fact, I invented a couple of songs that were remakes of other songs, just for the purpose of attacking clichés. There are no clichés on this album, and I did that for a specific reason. Rock and roll right now is jammed with clichés.” [3] Cooper described the photograph of him on the album's back cover as “very Haggar slacks. I look good. I look like a GQ ad, only I’m zipping up my pants and you can see definite pain on my face."”

Haggar® is a Dallas-based menswear brand sold in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

<i>GQ</i> American magazine

GQ is an international monthly men's magazine based in New York City and founded in 1931. The publication focuses on fashion, style, and culture for men, though articles on food, movies, fitness, sex, music, travel, sports, technology, and books are also featured.

Dick Wagner, who left halfway through the recording sessions, described Zipper Catches Skin as “the off to the races speedy album” [4] and a “drug induced nightmare”. [4] Wagner later revealed in a segment of the Deleted Scenes on the 2014 documentary film Super Duper Alice Cooper that Alice was smoking crack cocaine at the time and had a curtain set up behind the recording mic with a stool on it where he kept his crack pipe; he and other members of the band would sneak behind the curtain to take hits in between recording takes.

<i>Super Duper Alice Cooper</i> 2014 Canadian biographical documentary film

Super Duper Alice Cooper is a 2014 Canadian biographical documentary film about shock rock musician Alice Cooper, written and directed by Sam Dunn, Scot McFadyen and Reginald Harkema.

Crack cocaine Form of the drug cocaine

Crack cocaine, also known simply as crack or rock, is a free base form of cocaine that can be smoked. Crack offers a short but intense high to smokers. The Manual of Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment calls it the most addictive form of cocaine. Crack first saw widespread use as a recreational drug in primarily impoverished inner city neighborhoods in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, and Miami in late 1984 and 1985; its rapid increase in use and availability is sometimes termed as the "crack epidemic".

Zipper Catches Skin is the second of three albums which Alice refers to as his “blackout” albums, the others being the preceding album, Special Forces , and the following album, DaDa , as he has no recollection of recording them, due to the substance abuse, although he did manage to film a TV advert intended to promote Zipper at the time. [5] Cooper stated “I wrote them, recorded them and toured them and I don’t remember much of any of that”, [6] though he actually toured only Special Forces. [7] There was no tour to promote Zipper, and none of its songs have ever been played live.

<i>Special Forces</i> (Alice Cooper album) 1981 studio album by Alice Cooper

Special Forces is the sixth solo album by Alice Cooper, released in 1981, and was produced by Richard Podolor, most famous as the producer for Three Dog Night. Singles included “You Want It, You Got It”, “Who Do You Think We Are” and “Seven and Seven Is”. Flo and Eddie, former members of The Turtles, performers, and radio personalities, performed on this album.

<i>DaDa</i> 1983 studio album by Alice Cooper

DaDa is the eighth solo album by Alice Cooper. It was originally released in September 28, 1983, on the label Warner Bros.. DaDa would be Cooper's last album until his sober re-emergence in 1986 with the album Constrictor. The album's theme is ambiguous, however, ongoing themes in the songs' lyrics suggest that the main character in question, Sonny, suffers from mental illness, resulting in the creation of many different personalities. The album alludes strongly to the dadaist movement. Its cover was based on a painting by surrealist artist Salvador Dalí titled "Slave Market with the Disappearing Bust of Voltaire". Produced by long-time collaborator Bob Ezrin, at the time his first production with Cooper in six years, DaDa was recorded at ESP Studios in Buttonville, Ontario, Canada.

Album reception

Despite its first singleI Am the Future” being featured in the film Class of 1984 as its theme song, and The WaitressesPatty Donahue appearing on its other single “I Like Girls”, Zipper Catches Skin failed to chart in most countries, including in the US where it became Cooper's first album to not dent the Billboard Top 200 since Easy Action . The album's inconspicuous front cover, featuring just the album's lyrics with a smear of blood rather than exploiting the vivid imagery suggestive of the album's title, did not help the situation.

I Am the Future Alice Cooper song

"I Am the Future" is a 1982 song by rock musician Alice Cooper. The song was one of two singles released from his 1982 album Zipper Catches Skin. The single did not chart, and despite the advent of MTV at the time a promotional video was not created for it.

<i>Class of 1984</i> 1982 Canadian-American action-thriller movie directed by Mark L. Lester

Class of 1984 is a 1982 Canadian-American action thriller crime film directed by Mark L. Lester and co-written by Tom Holland and John Saxton based on a story by Holland. The film stars Perry King, Merrie Lynn Ross, Timothy Van Patten, Lisa Langlois, Stefan Arngrim, Michael J. Fox, and Roddy McDowall.

The Waitresses were a post-punk band from Akron, Ohio, known for their singles "I Know What Boys Like" and "Christmas Wrapping". They released two albums, Wasn't Tomorrow Wonderful and Bruiseology, and two EPs, I Could Rule the World If I Could Only Get the Parts and Make the Weather.


Track listing

Side one
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Zorro’s Ascent" Alice Cooper, John Nitzinger, Billy Steele, Erik Scott 3:56
2."Make That Money (Scrooge’s Song)"Cooper, Dick Wagner 3:30
3."I Am the Future" (From the Motion Picture Class of 1984 ) Gary Osborne, Lalo Schifrin 3:29
4."No Baloney Homosapiens (For Steve & E.T.)"Cooper, Wagner5:06
Side two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
5."Adaptable (Anything for You)"Cooper, Steele, Scott2:56
6."I Like Girls"Cooper, Nitzinger, Scott2:25
7."Remarkably Insincere"Cooper, Nitzinger, Scott2:07
8."Tag, You’re It"Cooper, Nitzinger, Scott2:54
9."I Better Be Good"Cooper, Wagner, Scott2:48
10."I'm Alive (That Was the Day My Dead Pet Returned to Save My Life)"Cooper, Wagner, Scott3:13

Personnel

Additional personnel

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References

  1. Guarisco, Donald A. "Zipper Catches Skin - Alice Cooper". Allmusic. Retrieved 28 September 2014.
  2. SickthingsUK - Erik Scott interview - August 2005
  3. Hit Parader magazine – ‘Jokers Wild’ article – March 1983 issue
  4. 1 2 SickthingsUK – Dick Wagner interview “ October 2004
  5. YouTube - "Zipper Catches Skin" TV spot - 1982
  6. The Quietus - "Love And Poison, An Alice Cooper Interview" - November 2009
  7. Alice Cooper eChive - Tour Archives