1999 Cricket World Cup

Last updated

ICC Cricket World Cup
England '99
Wc99.png
Logo of the ICC Cricket World Cup 1999
Dates14 May – 20 June
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One Day International
Tournament format(s) Round robin and Knockout
Host(s) Flag of England.svg England
Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland
Cricket Ireland flag.svg Ireland
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales
ChampionsFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (2nd title)
Runners-upFlag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
Participants12
Matches42
Player of the series Flag of South Africa.svg Lance Klusener
Most runs Flag of India.svg Rahul Dravid (461)
Most wickets Flag of New Zealand.svg Geoff Allott (20)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Shane Warne (20)
1996
2003

The 1999 Cricket World Cup (officially known as ICC Cricket World Cup '99) was the seventh edition of the Cricket World Cup, organised by the International Cricket Council (ICC). It was hosted primarily by England, with Scotland, Ireland, Wales and the Netherlands acting as co-hosts. The tournament was won by Australia, who beat Pakistan by 8 wickets in the final at Lord's Cricket Ground in London. New Zealand and South Africa were the other semi-finalists.

Contents

The tournament was hosted three years after the previous Cricket World Cup, deviating from the usual four-year gap. [1]

Format

It featured 12 teams, playing a total of 42 matches. In the group stage, the teams were divided into two groups of six; each team played all the others in their group once. The top three teams from each group advanced to the Super Sixes, a new concept for the 1999 World Cup; each team carried forward the points from the games against the other qualifiers from their group and then played each of the qualifiers from the other group (in other words, each qualifier from Group A played each qualifier from Group B and vice versa). The top four teams in the Super Sixes advanced to the semi-finals.

Qualification

The 1999 World Cup featured 12 teams, which was the same as the previous edition in 1996. The hosts England and the eight other test nations earned automatic qualification to the World Cup. The remaining three spots were decided at the 1997 ICC Trophy in Malaysia.

22 nations competed in the 1997 edition of the ICC Trophy. After going through two group stages, the semi-finals saw Kenya and Bangladesh qualify through to the World Cup. Scotland would be the third nation to qualify as they defeated Ireland in the third-place playoff. [2]

TeamMethod of qualificationFinals appearancesLast appearancePrevious best performanceGroup
Flag of England.svg  England Hosts7th 1996 Runners-up (1979, 1987, 1992)A
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Full member7th 1996 Champions(1987)B
Flag of India.svg  India 7th 1996 Champions(1983)A
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 7th 1996 Semi-finals (1975, 1979, 1992)B
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 7th 1996 Champions(1992 )B
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 3rd 1996 Semi-finals (1992)A
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 7th 1996 Champions(1996 )A
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 7th 1996 Champions(1975, 1979 )B
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 5th 1996 Group stage (All)A
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 1997 ICC Trophy winner1stDebutB
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 1997 ICC Trophy runner-up2nd 1996 Group stage (1996 )A
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1997 ICC Trophy third place1stDebutB

Venues

England

VenueCityCapacityMatches
Edgbaston Cricket Ground Birmingham, West Midlands21,0003
County Cricket Ground Bristol 8,0002
St Lawrence Ground Canterbury, Kent15,0001
County Cricket Ground Chelmsford, Essex6,5002
Riverside Ground Chester-Le-Street, County Durham15,0002
County Cricket Ground Derby, Derbyshire9,5001
County Cricket Ground Hove, Sussex7,0001
Headingley Leeds, West Yorkshire17,5003
Grace Road Leicester, Leicestershire12,0002
Lord's London, Greater London28,0003
London Oval London, Greater London25,5003
Old Trafford Manchester, Greater Manchester22,0003
County Cricket Ground Northampton, Northamptonshire6,5002
Trent Bridge Nottingham, Nottinghamshire17,5003
County Cricket Ground Southampton, Hampshire6,5002
County Cricket Ground Taunton, Somerset6,5002
New Road Worcester, Worcestershire4,5002

Outside England

Scotland played two of their Group B matches in their home country becoming the first associate nation to host games in a World Cup. One Group B match was played in Wales and Ireland respectively, while one Group A match was played in the Netherlands.

VenueCityCapacityMatches
VRA Cricket Ground Flag of the Netherlands.svg Amstelveen, Netherlands4,5001
Sophia Gardens Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Cardiff, Wales15,6531
Clontarf Cricket Club Ground Flag of Ireland.svg Dublin, Ireland3,2001
The Grange Club Flag of Scotland.svg Edinburgh, Scotland3,0002
Venues in Wales, Scotland and Ireland
Venues in the Netherlands

Squads

Group stage

Group A

TeamPldWLNRT NRR PtsPCF
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 541000.8682
Flag of India.svg  India 532001.2860
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 532000.0264
Flag of England.svg  England 53200−0.336N/A
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 52300−0.814N/A
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 50500−1.200N/A
14 May 1999
Scorecard
Sri Lanka  Flag of Sri Lanka.svg
204 (48.4 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
207/2 (46.5 overs)
Romesh Kaluwitharana 57 (66)
Alan Mullally 4/37 (10 overs)
Alec Stewart 88 (146)
Chaminda Vaas 1/27 (10 overs)
England won by 8 wickets
Lord's, London, England
Umpires: Rudi Koertzen (SA) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
Player of the match: Alec Stewart (Eng)

15 May 1999
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
253/5 (50 overs)
v
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
254/6 (47.2 overs)
Sourav Ganguly 97 (142)
Lance Klusener 3/66 (10 overs)
Jacques Kallis 96 (128)
Javagal Srinath 2/69 (10 overs)
South Africa won by 4 wickets
New County Ground, Hove, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Jacques Kallis (SA)

15 May 1999
Scorecard
Kenya  Flag of Kenya.svg
229/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
231/5 (41 overs)
Alpesh Vadher 54 (90)
Neil Johnson 4/42 (10 overs)
Neil Johnson 59 (70)
Maurice Odumbe 2/39 (7 overs)
Zimbabwe won by 5 wickets
County Ground, Taunton, England
Umpires: Doug Cowie (NZ) and Javed Akhtar (Pak)
Player of the match: Neil Johnson (Zim)

18 May 1999
Scorecard
Kenya  Flag of Kenya.svg
203 (49.4 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
204/1 (39 overs)
Steve Tikolo 71 (141)
Darren Gough 4/34 (10 overs)
Nasser Hussain 88* (127)
Thomas Odoyo 1/65 (10 overs)
England won by 9 wickets
St Lawrence Ground, Canterbury, England
Umpires: KT Francis (SL) and Rudi Koertzen (SA)
Player of the match: Steve Tikolo (Ken)

19 May 1999
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
252/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of India.svg  India
249 (45 overs)
Andy Flower 68* (85)
Javagal Srinath 2/35 (10 overs)
Sadagoppan Ramesh 55 (77)
Henry Olonga 3/22 (4 overs)
Zimbabwe won by 3 runs
Grace Road, Leicester, England
Umpires: Dave Orchard (SA) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Grant Flower (Zim)
  • India were fined four overs for a slow over rate in the first innings.

19 May 1999
Scorecard
South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg
199/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
110 (35.2 overs)
Lance Klusener 52* (45)
Muttiah Muralitharan 3/25 (10 overs)
Roshan Mahanama 36 (71)
Lance Klusener 3/21 (5.2 overs)
South Africa won by 89 runs
County Ground, Northampton, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and Steve Dunne (NZ)
Player of the match: Lance Klusener (SA)

22 May 1999
Scorecard
South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg
225/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
103 (41 overs)
Herschelle Gibbs 60 (99)
Alan Mullally 2/28 (10 overs)
Neil Fairbrother 21 (44)
Allan Donald 4/17 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 122 runs
The Oval, London, England
Umpires: Steve Dunne (NZ) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
Player of the match: Lance Klusener (SA)

22 May 1999
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
197/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
198/6 (46 overs)
Grant Flower 42 (69)
Pramodya Wickramasinghe 3/30 (10 overs)
Marvan Atapattu 54 (90)
Guy Whittall 3/35 (10 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 4 wickets
New Road, Worcester, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Marvan Atapattu (SL)

23 May 1999
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
329/2 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
235/7 (50 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 140 (101)
Martin Suji 1/26 (10 overs)
Steve Tikolo 58 (75)
Debashish Mohanty 4/56 (10 overs)
India won by 94 runs
County Ground, Bristol, England
Umpires: Doug Cowie (NZ) and Ian Robinson (Zim)
Player of the match: Sachin Tendulkar (Ind)

25 May 1999
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
167/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
168/3 (38.3 overs)
Grant Flower 35 (90)
Alan Mullally 2/16 (10 overs)
Graham Thorpe 62 (80)
Mpumelelo Mbangwa 2/28 (7 overs)
England won by 7 wickets
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and Darrell Hair (Aus)
Player of the match: Alan Mullally (Eng)

26 May 1999
Scorecard
Kenya  Flag of Kenya.svg
152 (44.3 overs)
v
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
153/3 (41 overs)
Ravindu Shah 50 (64)
Lance Klusener 5/21 (8.3 overs)
Jacques Kallis 44* (81)
Maurice Odumbe 1/15 (7 overs)
South Africa won by 7 wickets
VRA Ground, Amstelveen, Netherlands
Umpires: Doug Cowie (NZ) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Lance Klusener (SA)
  • South Africa qualified for Super Sixes stage. Kenya eliminated.

26 May 1999
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
373/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
216 (42.3 overs)
Sourav Ganguly 183 (158)
Pramodya Wickramasinghe 3/65 (10 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 56 (74)
Robin Singh 5/31 (9.3 overs)
India won by 157 runs
County Ground, Taunton, England
Umpires: Steve Dunne (NZ) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Sourav Ganguly (Ind)

29–30 May 1999
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
232/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
169 (45.2 overs)
Rahul Dravid 53 (82)
Mark Ealham 2/28 (10 overs)
Graham Thorpe 36 (57)
Sourav Ganguly 3/27 (8 overs)
India won by 63 runs
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
Umpires: Darrell Hair (Aus) and Javed Akhtar (Pak)
Player of the match: Sourav Ganguly (Ind)
  • India qualified for Super Sixes stage of tournament. Sri Lanka eliminated.

29 May 1999
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
233/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
185 (47.2 overs)
Neil Johnson 76 (117)
Allan Donald 3/41 (10 overs)
Lance Klusener 52* (58)
Neil Johnson 3/27 (8 overs)
Zimbabwe won by 48 runs
County Ground, Chelmsford, England
Umpires: David Shepherd (Eng) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
Player of the match: Neil Johnson (Zim)
  • Zimbabwe qualified for Super Sixes stage. England eliminated.

30 May 1999
Scorecard
Sri Lanka  Flag of Sri Lanka.svg
275/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
230/6 (50 overs)
Marvan Atapattu 52 (67)
Thomas Odoyo 3/56 (10 overs)
Maurice Odumbe 82 (95)
Chaminda Vaas 2/26 (7 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 45 runs
County Ground, Southampton, England
Umpires: Dave Orchard (SA) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Maurice Odumbe (Ken)

Group B

TeamPldWLNRT NRR PtsPCF
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 541000.5184
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 532000.7360
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 532000.5862
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 532000.506N/A
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 52300−0.524N/A
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 50500−1.930N/A
16 May 1999
Scorecard
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg
181/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
182/4 (44.5 overs)
Gavin Hamilton 34 (42)
Shane Warne 3/39 (10 overs)
Mark Waugh 67 (114)
Nick Dyer 2/43 (10 overs)
Australia won by 6 wickets
New Road, Worcester, England
Umpires: Steve Dunne (NZ) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Mark Waugh (Aus)

16 May 1999
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
229/8 (50 overs)
v
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
202 (48.5 overs)
Wasim Akram 43 (29)
Courtney Walsh 3/28 (10 overs)
Shivnarine Chanderpaul 77 (96)
Abdul Razzaq 3/32 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 27 runs
County Ground, Bristol, England
Umpires: Darrell Hair (Aus) and Dave Orchard (SA)
Player of the match: Azhar Mahmood (Pak)

17 May 1999
Scorecard
Bangladesh  Flag of Bangladesh.svg
116 (37.4 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
117/4 (33 overs)
Enamul Haque 19 (41)
Chris Cairns 3/19 (7 overs)
Matt Horne 35 (86)
Naimur Rahman 1/5 (2 overs)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets
County Ground, Chelmsford, England
Umpires: Ian Robinson (Zim) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
Player of the match: Gavin Larsen (NZ)

20 May 1999
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
213/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
214/5 (45.2 overs)
Darren Lehmann 76 (94)
Geoff Allott 4/37 (10 overs)
Roger Twose 80* (99)
Damien Fleming 2/43 (8.2 overs)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets
Sophia Gardens, Cardiff, Wales
Umpires: Javed Akhtar (Pak) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Roger Twose (NZ)

20 May 1999
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
261/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
167 (38.5 overs)
Yousuf Youhana 81* (119)
Gavin Hamilton 2/36 (10 overs)
Gavin Hamilton 76 (111)
Shoaib Akhtar 3/11 (6 overs)
Pakistan won by 94 runs
Riverside Ground, Chester-le-Street, England
Umpires: Doug Cowie (NZ) and Ian Robinson (Zim)
Player of the match: Yousuf Youhana (Pak)
  • Scotland conceded 59 extras, the joint highest in an ODI. [3]

21 May 1999
Scorecard
Bangladesh  Flag of Bangladesh.svg
182 (49.2 overs)
v
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
183/3 (46.3 overs)
Mehrab Hossain 64 (129)
Courtney Walsh 4/25 (10 overs)
Jimmy Adams 53* (82)
Minhajul Abedin 1/28 (7 overs)
West Indies won by 7 wickets
Clontarf Cricket Club Ground, Dublin, Ireland
Umpires: KT Francis (SL) and Darrell Hair (Aus)
Player of the match: Courtney Walsh (WI)

23 May 1999
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
275/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
265 (49.5 overs)
Inzamam-ul-Haq 81 (104)
Damien Fleming 2/37 (10 overs)
Michael Bevan 61 (80)
Wasim Akram 4/40 (9.5 overs)
Pakistan won by 10 runs
Headingley, Leeds, England
Umpires: Rudi Koertzen (SA) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Inzamam-ul-Haq (Pak)

24 May 1999
Scorecard
Bangladesh  Flag of Bangladesh.svg
185/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
163 (46.2 overs)
Minhajul Abedin 68* (116)
John Blain 4/37 (10 overs)
Gavin Hamilton 63 (71)
Hasibul Hossain 2/26 (8 overs)
Bangladesh won by 22 runs
Grange Cricket Club Ground, Edinburgh, Scotland
Umpires: KT Francis (SL) and Dave Orchard (SA)
Player of the match: Minhajul Abedin (Ban)

24 May 1999
Scorecard
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg
156 (48.1 overs)
v
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
158/3 (44.2 overs)
Craig McMillan 32 (78)
Mervyn Dillon 4/46 (9.1 overs)
Ridley Jacobs 80* (131)
Chris Harris 1/19 (8 overs)
West Indies won by 7 wickets
County Ground, Southampton, England
Umpires: Javed Akhtar (Pak) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
Player of the match: Ridley Jacobs (WI)

27 May 1999
Scorecard
Bangladesh  Flag of Bangladesh.svg
178/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
181/3 (19.5 overs)
Minhajul Abedin 53* (99)
Tom Moody 3/25 (10 overs)
Adam Gilchrist 63 (39)
Enamul Haque 2/40 (5 overs)
Australia won by 7 wickets
Riverside Ground, Chester-le-Street, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and Dave Orchard (SA)
Player of the match: Tom Moody (Aus)

27 May 1999
Scorecard
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg
68 (31.3 overs)
v
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
70/2 (10.1 overs)
Gavin Hamilton 24* (82)
Courtney Walsh 3/7 (7 overs)
Shivnarine Chanderpaul 30* (30)
John Blain 2/36 (5.1 overs)
West Indies won by 8 wickets
Grace Road, Leicester, England
Umpires: Javed Akhtar (Pak) and Ian Robinson (Zim)
Player of the match: Courtney Walsh (WI)
  • Scotland eliminated as a result of this match

28 May 1999
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
269/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
207/8 (50 overs)
Inzamam-ul-Haq 73* (61)
Geoff Allott 4/64 (10 overs)
Stephen Fleming 69 (100)
Azhar Mahmood 3/38 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 62 runs
County Ground, Derby, England
Umpires: KT Francis (SL) and Rudi Koertzen (SA)
Player of the match: Inzamam-ul-Haq (Pak)
  • Pakistan qualified for Super Six stage

30 May 1999
Scorecard
West Indies  WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
110 (46.4 overs)
v
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
111/4 (40.4 overs)
Ridley Jacobs 49* (142)
Glenn McGrath 5/14 (8.4 overs)
Adam Gilchrist 21 (36)
Curtly Ambrose 3/31 (10 overs)
Australia won by 6 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
Umpires: Steve Dunne (NZ) and KT Francis (SL)
Player of the match: Glenn McGrath (Aus)
  • Australia needed to score 111 within 47.2 overs to qualify for the Super Six stage of the tournament. Australia qualified for the Super Sixes. Bangladesh eliminated.
  • Ridley Jacobs (WI) became the first cricketer to carry his bat in a World Cup match. [4]

31 May 1999
Scorecard
Bangladesh  Flag of Bangladesh.svg
223/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
161 (44.3 overs)
Akram Khan 42 (66)
Saqlain Mushtaq 5/35 (10 overs)
Wasim Akram 29 (52)
Khaled Mahmud 3/31 (10 overs)
Bangladesh won by 62 runs
County Ground, Northampton, England
Umpires: Doug Cowie (NZ) and Darrell Hair (Aus)
Player of the match: Khaled Mahmud (Ban)

31 May 1999
Scorecard
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg
121 (42.1 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
123/4 (17.5 overs)
Ian Stanger 27 (58)
Chris Harris 4/7 (3.1 overs)
Roger Twose 54* (49)
John Blain 3/53 (7 overs)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets
Grange Cricket Club Ground, Edinburgh, Scotland
Umpires: Rudi Koertzen (SA) and Ian Robinson (Zim)
Player of the match: Geoff Allott (NZ)
  • New Zealand needed to score 122 within 21.2 overs to qualify for Super Sixes stage. New Zealand qualified for Super Sixes. West Indies eliminated.

Super Six

This stage was among the most viewed segments of the tournament, as India and Pakistan were officially at war at the time of their match, the only time this has ever happened in the history of the sport.[ citation needed ]

Teams who qualified for the Super Six stage only played against the teams from the other group; results against the other teams from the same group were carried forward to this stage. Results against the non-qualifying teams were therefore discarded at this point.

As a result of League match losses against New Zealand and Pakistan, even though Australia finished second in their group, they progressed to the Super Six stage with no points carried forward (PCF). India faced similar circumstances, finishing 2nd in their group but carrying forward 0 points after losing to fellow qualifiers Zimbabwe and South Africa.

TeamPldWLNRT NRR PtsPCF
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 532000.6564
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 532000.3660
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 532000.1762
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 52210−0.5252
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 52210−0.7954
Flag of India.svg  India 51400−0.1520
Source:Cricinfo
4 June 1999
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
282/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of India.svg  India
205 (48.2 overs)
Mark Waugh 83 (99)
Robin Singh 2/43 (7 overs)
Ajay Jadeja 100* (138)
Glenn McGrath 3/34 (10 overs)
Australia won by 77 runs
The Oval, London, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Glenn McGrath (Aus)

5 June 1999
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
220/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
221/7 (49 overs)
Moin Khan 63 (56)
Steve Elworthy 2/23 (10 overs)
Jacques Kallis 54 (98)
Azhar Mahmood 3/24 (10 overs)
South Africa won by 3 wickets
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
Umpires: Darrell Hair (Aus) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Lance Klusener (SA)

6–7 June 1999
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
175 (49.3 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
70/3 (15 overs)
Murray Goodwin 57 (90)
Chris Cairns 3/24 (6.3 overs)
Matt Horne 35 (35)
Guy Whittall 1/9 (3 overs)
No result
Headingley, Leeds, England
Umpires: Dave Orchard (SA) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
  • Rain interrupted play when 36 overs of Zimbabwe's innings had been bowled. No play was possible on reserve day.

8 June 1999
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
227/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
180 (45.3 overs)
Rahul Dravid 61 (89)
Wasim Akram 2/27 (10 overs)
Inzamam-Ul-Haq 41 (93)
Venkatesh Prasad 5/27 (9.3 overs)
India won by 47 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Venkatesh Prasad (Ind)

9 June 1999
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
303/4 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
259/6 (50 overs)
Mark Waugh 104 (120)
Neil Johnson 2/43 (8 overs)
Neil Johnson 132* (144)
Paul Reiffel 3/55 (10 overs)
Australia won by 44 runs
Lord's, London, England
Umpires: Doug Cowie (NZ) and Rudi Koertzen (SA)
Player of the match: Neil Johnson (Zim)

10 June 1999
Scorecard
South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg
287/5 (50 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
213/8 (50 overs)
Herschelle Gibbs 91 (118)
Nathan Astle 1/29 (6 overs)
Stephen Fleming 42 (64)
Jacques Kallis 2/15 (6 overs)
South Africa won by 74 runs
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
Umpires: Ian Robinson (Zim) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
Player of the match: Jacques Kallis (SA)
  • South Africa qualified for Semi-finals.

11 June 1999
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
271/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
123 (40.3 overs)
Saeed Anwar 103 (144)
Henry Olonga 2/38 (5 overs)
Neil Johnson 54 (94)
Saqlain Mushtaq 3/16 (6.3 overs)
Pakistan won by 148 runs
The Oval, London, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and Dave Orchard (SA)
Player of the match: Saeed Anwar (Pak)

12 June 1999
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
251/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
253/5 (48.2 overs)
Ajay Jadeja 76 (103)
Chris Cairns 2/44 (10 overs)
Matt Horne 74 (116)
Debashish Mohanty 2/41 (10 overs)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
Umpires: Darrell Hair (Aus) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Roger Twose (NZ)
  • New Zealand qualified for Semi-finals. India were eliminated.

13 June 1999
Scorecard
South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg
271/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
272/5 (49.4 overs)
Herschelle Gibbs 101 (134)
Damien Fleming 3/57 (10 overs)
Steve Waugh 120* (110)
Steve Elworthy 2/46 (10 overs)
Australia won by 5 wickets
Headingley, Leeds, England
Umpires: Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Steve Waugh (Aus)
  • Australia qualified for Semi-finals. Zimbabwe were eliminated.

Semi-finals

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
16 June – Old Trafford, Manchester
 
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 241/7
 
20 June – Lord's, London
 
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 242/1
 
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 132
 
17 June – Edgbaston, Birmingham
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 133/2
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 213
 
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 213
 
16 June 1999
Scorecard
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg
241/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
242/1 (47.3 overs)
Roger Twose 46 (83)
Shoaib Akhtar 3/55 (10 overs)
Saeed Anwar 113* (148)
Chris Cairns 1/33 (8 overs)
Pakistan won by 9 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
Umpires: Darrell Hair (Aus) and Peter Willey (Eng)
Player of the match: Shoaib Akhtar (Pak)

17 June 1999
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
213 (49.2 overs)
v
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
213 (49.4 overs)
Michael Bevan 65 (101)
Shaun Pollock 5/36 (9.2 overs)
Jacques Kallis 53 (92)
Shane Warne 4/29 (10 overs)
Match tied
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
Umpires: David Shepherd (Eng) and Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Ind)
Player of the match: Shane Warne (Aus)
  • Australia progressed to the final because they finished higher in the Super Six table than South Africa due to a superior net run rate.

Final

20 June 1999
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
132 (39 overs)
v
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
133/2 (20.1 overs)
Ijaz Ahmed 22 (46)
Shane Warne 4/33 (9 overs)
Adam Gilchrist 54 (36)
Saqlain Mushtaq 1/21 (4.1 overs)
Australia won by 8 wickets
Lord's, London, England
Umpires: Steve Bucknor (WI) and David Shepherd (Eng)
Player of the match: Shane Warne (Aus)

Statistics

Lance Klusener of South Africa was declared the Player of the Tournament. Rahul Dravid of India scored the most runs (461) in the tournament. Geoff Allott of New Zealand and Shane Warne of Australia tied each other for most wickets taken (20) in the tournament. [5]

Match balls

A new type of cricket ball, the white 'Duke', was introduced for the first time in the 1999 World Cup. Despite claims from makers British Cricket Balls Ltd that the balls behaved identically to the balls used in previous World Cups, [6] experiments showed they were harder and swung more. [7]

Media

The host broadcasters for television coverage of the tournament were Sky and BBC Television. [8] In the UK, live games were divided between the broadcasters, with both screening the final live. [8] This was to be BBC's last live cricket coverage during that summer, with all of England's home Test series being shown on Channel 4 or Sky from 1999 onwards; the BBC did not show any live cricket again until August 2020. [9]

References and notes

  1. "Sourav Ganguly Doubtful About ICC's Plans To Host Cricket World Cup Every Three Years". Outlook. PTI. 16 October 2019. Retrieved 23 November 2020.
  2. "Carlsberg ICC Trophy, Malaysia Headlines" . Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  3. "Most extras in an ODI innings".
  4. "Cricket World Cup 2019: Ferguson, Henry skittle Sri Lanka for 136". Cricket Country. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  5. "ICC World Cup, 1999, Final". Cricinfo. Archived from the original on 21 April 2007. Retrieved 29 April 2007.
  6. "The swinging Duke is not all it seams". The Independent. London. 9 May 1999.
  7. "Why white is the thing for swing". The Guardian. London. 14 May 1999.
  8. 1 2 ECB Media Release (10 March 1998). "Live coverage of the Cricket World Cup - to be staged in the UK next year". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 25 November 2014.
  9. "BSkyB lands England Test coverage". BBC. 15 December 2004. Retrieved 17 May 2014.

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