2nd Academy Awards

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2nd Academy Awards
DateApril 3, 1930
Site Ambassador Hotel,
Los Angeles, California
Hosted by William C. DeMille
Highlights
Best Picture The Broadway Melody
Most awardsSeven films each received one award. [upper-alpha 1]
Most nominations In Old Arizona and The Patriot (5)

The 2nd Academy Awards, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) on April 3, 1930, at an awards banquet in the Cocoanut Grove of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, honored the best films released between August 1, 1928, and July 31, 1929. This was the first Academy Awards ceremony broadcast on radio, by local station KNX, Los Angeles. [1]

Contents

The second ceremony included a number of changes from the first: most importantly, it was the first presentation for which the winners were not announced in advance, and the number of award categories was reduced from twelve to seven. It is unique in being the only occasion where there were no official nominees; subsequent research by AMPAS resulted in a list of unofficial or de facto nominees, based on records of which films were evaluated by the judges. Chester Morris was the first nominee for Best Actor born in the 20th century.

Mary Pickford, a founding member of AMPAS and married to its first president, lobbied to be considered for the Best Actress award, inviting the judges over for tea at her home, [2] while other actresses being considered for the same award were not made aware of their status. [3]

Jeanne Eagels became the first and, to date, only actress to be posthumously nominated for Best Actress, for The Letter . The Divine Lady became the last film to win Best Director without receiving a Best Picture nomination.

This is the only year in which no film won more than one Oscar. The Broadway Melody became the second of seven films to win Best Picture without a writing nomination (preceded by Wings , and followed by Grand Hotel , Cavalcade , Hamlet , The Sound of Music , and Titanic ), and the first of three to win Best Picture and nothing else (followed by Grand Hotel and Mutiny on the Bounty ).

Academy Awards of Merit

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Irving Thalberg, Outstanding Picture co-winner
Frank Lloyd, Boxoffice Barometer, 1939.jpg
Frank Lloyd, Best Director winner
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Warner Baxter, Best Actor winner
Mary Pickford cph.3c17995u.jpg
Mary Pickford, Best Actress winner
Cedric-Gibbons-1936.jpg
Cedric Gibbons, Best Art Direction winner
Clyde De Vinna.jpg
Clyde De Vinna, Best Cinematography winner

Nominees were announced on October 31, 1929. Winners are listed first, highlighted in boldface and indicated with a double-dagger (Double-dagger-14-plain.png).

Honorary awards

No Honorary Academy Awards then called Special Awards were conferred at the 2nd Academy Awards ceremony.

Multiple nominations and awards

The following 9 films received multiple nominations:

Changes to Academy Awards

Beginning with the 2nd Academy Awards (19281929), the following changes were made by AMPAS.

Notable awards and nominations

In Old Arizona and The Patriot with five nominations each tied the record for the film receiving the most Academy Award nominations. This record was set by 7th Heaven at the 1st Academy Awards (19271928). One year later, at the 3rd Academy Awards (19291930), the record was broken by The Love Parade , which garnered six nominations. The current record for the film receiving the most Academy Award nominations with fourteen nominations apiece is held by All About Eve (1950), Titanic (1997), and La La Land (2016). This record has stood for 73 years.

See also

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References

Notes
  1. At the 2nd Academy Awards (1928–1929), no film received more than one award. Seven films each received one Academy Award of Merit. To date, this result has never been repeated in subsequent Academy Awards ceremonies.
Citations
  1. Dunning, John (1998). On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio (Revised ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. pp.  4–5. ISBN   978-0-19-507678-3 . Retrieved September 10, 2019. The Academy Awards Show.
  2. Whitfield, Eileen (1997). Pickford: The Woman Who Made Hollywood. Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky. p. 263. ISBN   978-0-8131-2045-4. OCLC   37465308.
  3. White, Michael (April 28, 1972). "The Actress and the Four-Letter Cliche". The Guardian . London. p. 13. As the elder sister in Broadway Melody she got an Oscar nomination, which in all honesty she doesn't recall at all. 'So many people have said it that it must be true.'