33rd Academy Awards

Last updated
33rd Academy Awards
DateApril 17, 1961
Site Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, California
Hosted by Bob Hope
Produced by Arthur Freed
Directed byRichard Dunlap
Highlights
Best Picture The Apartment
Most awardsThe Apartment (5)
Most nominationsThe Apartment (10)
TV in the United States
Network ABC

The 33rd Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1960, were held on April 17, 1961, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope. This was the first ceremony to be aired on ABC television, which has aired the Academy Awards ever since (save for the period between 1971 and 1975, when they were aired on NBC for the first time since the previous year.)

Contents

The Apartment was the last black-and-white film to win Best Picture until Schindler's List (1993).

Gary Cooper was selected by the Academy Board of Governors to be the year's recipient of the Academy Honorary Award "for his many memorable screen performances and the international recognition he, as an individual, has gained for the motion picture industry". Cooper was too ill to attend the ceremony, though his condition was not publicly disclosed, save for his family and close friends. At the awards ceremony, James Stewart, a close friend of Cooper, accepted the Honorary Oscar on his behalf. Stewart's emotional speech hinted that something was seriously wrong, and the next day newspapers ran the headline, "Gary Cooper has cancer". Less than four weeks later, on May 13, 1961, six days after his 60th birthday, Cooper died.

Young and rising star Hayley Mills was selected by the Academy Board of Governors to be the year's recipient of the Academy Juvenile Award for her breakthrough and acclaimed performance in Walt Disney's production of Pollyanna . Mills became the last recipient of the award, as the Academy retired the award afterwards. From 1963 onward, juvenile actors could officially compete in competitive acting awards with their adult counterparts. This was the first year a red carpet would line the walk into the theater. [1]

Awards

Gloria Swanson & Billy Wilder - ca. 1950.JPG
Billy Wilder (right); Best Picture and Best Director winner and Best Story and Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen co-winner
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Burt Lancaster; Best Actor winner
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Peter Ustinov; Best Supporting Actor winner
The Partridge Family Shirley Jones 1972.jpg
Shirley Jones; Best Supporting Actress winner
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Richard Brooks; Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium winner
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Bill Thomas; Best Costume Design, Color co-winner
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Hayley Mills; Academy Juvenile Award recipient

Winners are listed first and highlighted with boldface [2]

Best Motion Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Story and Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium
Best Foreign Language Film Best Documentary Feature
Best Documentary Short Subject Best Live Action Short Subject
Best Short Subjects – Cartoons Best Music Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture
Best Scoring of a Musical Picture Best Song
Best Sound Best Art Direction, Black-and-White
Best Art Direction, Color Best Cinematography, Black-and-White
Best Cinematography, Color Best Costume Design, Black-and-White
Best Costume Design, Color Best Film Editing
Best Special Effects

Academy Honorary Awards

Academy Juvenile Award

Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award

Presenters and performers

Presenters

Performers

Multiple nominations and awards

See also

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References

  1. Daniel Miller (February 24, 2017). "The red carpet isn't actually red, and other secrets underfoot at the Oscars". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  2. "The 33rd Academy Awards (1961) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on October 15, 2015. Retrieved May 4, 2015.