20th Academy Awards

Last updated
20th Academy Awards
DateMarch 20, 1948
Site Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, United States
Hosted by Agnes Moorehead
Dick Powell
Highlights
Best Picture Gentleman's Agreement
Most awardsGentleman's Agreement and Miracle on 34th Street (3)
Most nominationsGentleman's Agreement (8)

No film received more than three awards at the 20th Academy Awards. This would not recur until the 78th Academy Awards.

78th Academy Awards

The 78th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), took place on March 5, 2006, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:00 p.m. PST / 8:00 p.m. EST. The ceremony was scheduled one week later than usual to avoid conflicting with the 2006 Winter Olympics. During the ceremony, AMPAS presented Academy Awards in 24 categories honoring films released in 2005. The ceremony, televised in the United States by ABC, was produced by Gil Cates and directed by Louis J. Horvitz. Actor Jon Stewart hosted the show for the first time. Two weeks earlier in a ceremony at The Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California held on February 18, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by host Rachel McAdams.

Contents

Rosalind Russell was highly favored to win Best Actress her performance in Mourning Becomes Electra , [1] but Loretta Young won instead for The Farmer's Daughter .

Rosalind Russell American actress

Catherine Rosalind Russell was an American actress, comedian, screenwriter and singer, known for her role as fast-talking newspaper reporter Hildy Johnson in the Howard Hawks screwball comedy His Girl Friday (1940), as well as for her portrayals of Mame Dennis in Auntie Mame (1958) and Rose in Gypsy (1962). A noted comedian, she won all five Golden Globes for which she was nominated. Russell won a Tony Award in 1953 for Best Performance by an Actress in a Musical for her portrayal of Ruth in the Broadway show Wonderful Town. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress four times throughout her career.

<i>Mourning Becomes Electra</i> (film) 1947 film by Dudley Nichols

Mourning Becomes Electra is a 1947 American drama film by Dudley Nichols adapted from the 1931 Eugene O'Neill play Mourning Becomes Electra. The film stars Rosalind Russell, Michael Redgrave, Raymond Massey, Katina Paxinou, Leo Genn and Kirk Douglas.

Loretta Young American actress

Loretta Young was an American actress. Starting as a child actress, she had a long and varied career in film from 1917 to 1953. She won the 1948 Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the 1947 film The Farmer's Daughter and received an Oscar nomination for her role in Come to the Stable in 1949. Young moved to the relatively new medium of television, where she had a dramatic anthology series, The Loretta Young Show, from 1953 to 1961. The series earned three Emmy Awards and was rerun successfully on daytime TV and later in syndication. In the 1980s, Young returned to the small screen and won a Golden Globe for her role in Christmas Eve in 1986.

James Baskett received an Academy Honorary Award for his portrayal of Uncle Remus in Song of the South , which made him the first African-American man and the first Walt Disney star to win an Academy Award for acting. [1]

James Baskett actor

James Baskett was an American actor known for his portrayal of Uncle Remus, singing the song "Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah" in the 1946 Disney feature film Song of the South. In recognition of his warm portrayal of the famous black storyteller he was given an Honorary Academy Award, making him the first black male performer to receive an Oscar.

The Academy Honorary Award – instituted in 1950 for the 23rd Academy Awards – is given annually by the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards, although prior winners of competitive Academy Awards are not excluded from receiving the Honorary Award.

<i>Song of the South</i> 1946 American live-action animated film

Song of the South is a 1946 American live-action/animated musical film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. It is based on the collection of Uncle Remus stories as adapted by Joel Chandler Harris, and stars James Baskett as Uncle Remus. The film takes place in the southern United States during the Reconstruction Era, a period of American history shortly after the end of the American Civil War and the abolition of slavery. The story follows 7-year-old Johnny who is visiting his grandmother's plantation for an extended stay. Johnny befriends Uncle Remus, one of the workers on the plantation, and takes joy in hearing his tales about the adventures of Br'er Rabbit, Br'er Fox, and Br'er Bear. Johnny learns from the stories how to cope with the challenges he is experiencing living on the plantation.

At age 71, Edmund Gwenn was the oldest Oscar-winner to that time. The previous oldest was Charles Coburn, who was 66 at the time of his win. In 1976, George Burns would become the oldest Oscar-winner, at age 80.

Edmund Gwenn actor

Edmund Gwenn was an English actor. On film, he is perhaps best remembered for his role as Kris Kringle in the Christmas film Miracle on 34th Street (1947), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and the corresponding Golden Globe Award. He received a second Golden Globe and another Academy Award nomination for the comedy film Mister 880 (1950). He is also remembered for being in four films directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Charles Coburn American film and theater actor

Charles Douville Coburn was an American film and theatre actor. Best known for his work in comedies, Coburn received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for 1943's The More the Merrier.

George Burns American comedian, actor, and writer

George Burns was an American comedian, actor, singer, and writer. He was one of the few entertainers whose career successfully spanned vaudeville, radio, film and television. His arched eyebrow and cigar-smoke punctuation became familiar trademarks for over three quarters of a century. He and his wife, Gracie Allen, appeared on radio, television, and film as the comedy duo Burns and Allen.

Awards

Winners are listed first and highlighted in boldface. [2]

Best Motion Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Original Screenplay Best Screenplay
Best Motion Picture Story Best Short Subject – Cartoons
Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short Subject
Best Live Action Short Subject, One-Reel Best Live Action Short Subject, Two-Reel
  • Climbing the Matterhorn Irving Allen Double-dagger-14-plain.png
    • Champagne for Two – Harry Grey
    • Fight of the Wild Stallions – Thomas Mead
    • Give Us the Earth – Herbert Morgan
    • A Voice Is Born: The Story of Niklos Gafni – Ben Blake
Best Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture Best Scoring of a Musical Picture
Best Original Song Best Sound Recording
Best Art Direction – Set Decoration, Black-and-White Best Art Direction – Set Decoration, Color
Best Cinematography, Black-and-White Best Cinematography, Color
Best Film Editing Best Special Effects

Academy Honorary Awards

Uncle Remus fairy tale of South United States

Uncle Remus is the fictional title character and narrator of a collection of African-American folktales adapted and compiled by Joel Chandler Harris, published in book form in 1881. A journalist in post-Reconstruction Atlanta, Georgia, Harris produced seven Uncle Remus books. He wrote these stories to represent the struggle in the Southern United States, and more specifically in the plantations. He did so by introducing tales he had heard and framing them in the plantation context. He wrote his stories in a dialect that represented the voice of the narrators and their subculture. For this choice of framing, his collection has encountered controversy.

Walt Disney American film producer and businessman

Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.

Bill and Coo is a 1948 film directed by Dean Riesner, filmed in Trucolor, and conceived to showcase George Burton's trained birds.

Best Foreign Language Film

Presenters

Performers

Multiple nominations and awards

See also

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Events in 1948 in animation.

References

  1. 1 2 Dirks, Tim. "1947 Academy Awards Winners and History". FilmSite.org (American Movie Classics). Archived from the original on April 19, 2015. Retrieved September 2, 2015.
  2. "The 20th Academy Awards (1948) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences). Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-18.