27th Academy Awards

Last updated
27th Academy Awards
DateMarch 30, 1955
Site RKO Pantages Theatre
Hollywood, California and
NBC Century Theatre
New York City, New York
Hosted by Bob Hope (Hollywood) and
Thelma Ritter (New York City)
Highlights
Best Picture On the Waterfront
Most awardsOn the Waterfront (8)
Most nominationsOn the Waterfront (12)
TV in the United States
Network NBC

The 27th Academy Awards honored the best films released in 1954. The Best Picture winner, On the Waterfront , was produced by Sam Spiegel and directed by Elia Kazan. It had twelve nominations and eight wins, matching two other films, Gone with the Wind (1939) and From Here to Eternity (1953), though those each had thirteen nominations.

Contents

On the Waterfront was the third film to receive five acting nominations, and the first to receive three in the Best Supporting Actor category. A "rematch" occurred in the category of Best Actor between Marlon Brando and Humphrey Bogart following Bogart's upset victory three years earlier. In a surprise win (Bing Crosby was the favored nominee), Brando received his first Oscar for his performance in On the Waterfront, which is now seen as one of the most justified upsets in Oscar history. [1] The win was a culmination of four consecutive Best Actor nominations for Brando (starting with A Streetcar Named Desire in 1951), a record that remains unmatched to this day.

Grace Kelly won Best Actress for The Country Girl in another upset. Judy Garland, who was heavily favored to win Best Actress for the movie A Star Is Born , could not attend the ceremony as she had only recently given birth to her third child. Cameras were set up in her room so she could express her thanks in the likely case of her winning. Groucho Marx later sent her a telegram expressing that her loss was "the biggest robbery since Brink's". [2]

Another major upset was the title song from the 20th Century Fox film Three Coins in the Fountain winning the Best Song award over "The Man That Got Away" from A Star Is Born.

Dorothy Dandridge became the first African American actress to receive a nomination for Best Actress.

Awards

Elia Kazan.JPG
Elia Kazan; Best Director winner
Grace Kelly MGM photo.jpg
Grace Kelly; Best Actress winner
EdmondOBrien.jpg
Edmond O'Brien; Best Supporting Actor winner
Eva Marie Saint 1990.jpg
Eva Marie Saint; Best Supporting Actress winner
Budd Schulberg - 1967.jpg
Budd Schulberg; Best Story and Screenplay winner
Walt Disney 1946.JPG
Walt Disney; Best Documentary Feature winner
Sammy Cahn 1950s.JPG
Sammy Cahn; Best Original Song co-winner

Winners are listed first and highlighted in boldface. [3]

Best Motion Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Screenplay Best Story and Screenplay
Best Story Best Short Subject - Cartoons
Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short Subject
Best Live Action Short Subject, One-Reel Best Live Action Short Subject, Two-Reel
Best Music Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture Best Scoring of a Musical Picture
Best Song Best Sound Recording
Best Art Direction, Black-and-White Best Art Direction, Color
Best Cinematography, Black-and-White Best Cinematography, Color
Best Costume Design, Black-and-White Best Costume Design, Color
Best Film Editing Best Special Effects

Academy Honorary Awards

Best Foreign Language Film

Presenters and performers

Presenters

Performers

Multiple nominations and awards

See also

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References

  1. Premiere. "100 Greatest Performances of All Time: 24-1". Archived from the original on 31 January 2009. Retrieved 2008-12-23.
  2. The Biographicon. "Judy Garland – Biography". Archived from the original on 2010-01-14. Retrieved 2009-09-06.
  3. "The 27th Academy Awards (1955) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences). Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-20.