661

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
661 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 661
DCLXI
Ab urbe condita 1414
Armenian calendar 110
ԹՎ ՃԺ
Assyrian calendar 5411
Balinese saka calendar 582–583
Bengali calendar 68
Berber calendar 1611
Buddhist calendar 1205
Burmese calendar 23
Byzantine calendar 6169–6170
Chinese calendar 庚申(Metal  Monkey)
3357 or 3297
     to 
辛酉年 (Metal  Rooster)
3358 or 3298
Coptic calendar 377–378
Discordian calendar 1827
Ethiopian calendar 653–654
Hebrew calendar 4421–4422
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 717–718
 - Shaka Samvat 582–583
 - Kali Yuga 3761–3762
Holocene calendar 10661
Iranian calendar 39–40
Islamic calendar 40–41
Japanese calendar N/A
Javanese calendar 552–553
Julian calendar 661
DCLXI
Korean calendar 2994
Minguo calendar 1251 before ROC
民前1251年
Nanakshahi calendar −807
Seleucid era 972/973 AG
Thai solar calendar 1203–1204
Tibetan calendar 阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
787 or 406 or −366
     to 
阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
788 or 407 or −365
Expansion of the caliphate under the Umayyads:
Expansion under Muhammad, 622–632
Expansion during the Rashidun Caliphate, 632–661
Expansion during the Umayyad Caliphate, 661–750 Map of expansion of Caliphate.svg
Expansion of the caliphate under the Umayyads:
  Expansion under Muhammad, 622–632
  Expansion during the Rashidun Caliphate, 632–661
  Expansion during the Umayyad Caliphate, 661–750

Year 661 ( DCLXI ) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 661 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. The most recent year of such kind was 2010 and the next one will be 2021 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2011 and 2022 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 2100, will also be a common year starting on Friday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in August. Leap years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another one in February.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Europe

Chlothar III King of Naustria and Burgundy

Chlothar III was the eldest son of Clovis II, king of Neustria and Burgundy, and his queen Balthild. When Clovis died in 658, Chlothar succeeded him under the regency of his mother. Only a month beforehand, according to the near-contempoary Life of Eligius by the courtier Audoin (bishop) of Rouen, Saint Eligius had prophesied the death of Clovis, Balthild's downfall, and Chlothar's short reign.

Neustria western part of the kingdom of the Franks

Neustria, or Neustrasia, was the western part of the Kingdom of the Franks.

Balthild Wife of Clovis II

Saint Balthild of Ascania, also called Bathilda, Baudour, or Bauthieult, was queen consort of Burgundy and Neustria by marriage to Clovis II, the king of Burgundy and Neustria (639–658), and regent during the minority of her son. Her hagiography was intended to further her successful candidature for sainthood.

Britain

Posbury hillfort in Devon

Posbury is an ancient estate in Devon, now a hamlet, situated about 2 miles south-west of Crediton and 2 miles north of Tedburn St Mary and 1 mile west of the small hamlet of Venny Tedburn.

Cenwalh, also Cenwealh or Coenwalh, was King of Wessex from c. 642 to c. 645 and from c. 648 until his death, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, in c. 672.

Dumnonia Former kingdom in southwestern Britain

Dumnonia is the Latinised name for the Brythonic kingdom in Sub-Roman Britain between the late 4th and late 8th centuries, in what is now the more westerly parts of South West England. It was centred in the area later called Devon, but included modern Cornwall and part of Somerset, with its eastern boundary changing over time as the gradual westward expansion of the neighbouring Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex encroached on its territory. The spelling Damnonia is sometimes encountered, but is also used for the land of the Damnonii, later part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde, in what is today southern Scotland. Domnonia also occurs and shares a linguistic relationship with the Breton region of Domnonée, Breton: Domnonea.

Arabian Empire

January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 338 days remaining until the end of the year.

Assassination of Ali

Ali ibn Abi Talib, the fourth (last) Rashidun caliph and first Shi'ite Imam, was assassinated by a Kharijite called Ibn Muljam on 26 January 661, at the Great Mosque of Kufah in present-day Iraq. Ali, who was then 62 or 63 years of age, died due to his injuries two days after Ibn Muljam struck him on his head by a poison-coated sword, on the 21 Ramadan 40 AH. He was the third successive caliph, after Umar and Uthman, to be assassinated.

Ali Cousin and son-in-law of Muhammad, first of the Shia Imams, and fourth Sunni Caliph

Ali was the cousin and son-in-law of Muhammad, the last prophet of Islam. He ruled as the fourth caliph from 656 to 661, but is regarded as the rightful immediate successor to Muhammad as an Imam by Shia Muslims.

Japan

  • Approximate date The imperial fleet of Japan invades Kyūshū by the order of Empress Kōgyoku. On its way, princess Nukata composes a famous poem at Nikitatsu in Iyo Province.
  • c. May Empress Kōgyoku builds the palace of Asakura in Kyūshū, from trees cut down from the shrines. Two months later she dies. People say it is because the gods are angry with her for destroying the shrines.
  • July 24 Emperor Tenji ascends to the throne of Japan after his mother Empress Kōgyoku's death. He sends an expeditionary force under Abe no Hirafu to Korea, to help the allied kingdom of Baekje.
Empress Kōgyoku Empress of Japan

Empress Kōgyoku, also known as Empress Saimei, was the 35th and 37th monarch of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Princess Nukata was a Japanese poet of the Asuka period.

Iyo Province former province of Japan

Iyo Province was an old province of Japan in the area that is today Ehime Prefecture on Shikoku. Iyo bordered on Awa, Sanuki, and Tosa Provinces. It was sometimes called Yoshū (予州).

Korea

  • King Munmu becomes the 30th ruler of the Korean kingdom of Silla.

Munmu of Silla (626–681) was the thirtieth king of the Korean kingdom of Silla. He is usually considered to have been the first ruler of the Unified Silla period. Munmu was the son of King Muyeol and Munmyeong, who was the younger sister of Kim Yu-shin. Under his father's reign, he held the office of pajinchan, who apparently was responsible for maritime affairs, and played a key role in developing the country's diplomatic links with T'ang China. He was born Prince Beopmin, and took the name Munmu when he succeeded his father to the throne.

Silla Old kingdom of Korea

Silla was a kingdom located in southern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula. Silla, along with Baekje and Goguryeo, formed the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

By topic

Religion

  • Maximus the Confessor, Christian monk, is recalled from exile in Thrace. He is tried, and sentenced to mutilation. His tongue and his right hand are cut off to prevent his further opposition to the Monothelites.
  • Approximate date In Gaul all Roman bishops are replaced with Frankish bishops. They become increasingly common, as Frankish leaders control the episcopate.

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 700s decade ran from January 1, 700, to December 31, 709.

The 650s decade ran from January 1, 650, to December 31, 659.

The 660s decade ran from January 1, 660, to December 31, 669.

The 680s decade ran from January 1, 680, to December 31, 689.

740 Year

Year 740 (DCCXL) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 740 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

818 Year

Year 818 (DCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

659 Year

Year 659 (DCLIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 659 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

830 Year

Year 830 (DCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

680 Year

Year 680 (DCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 680 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

715 Year

Year 715 (DCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 715 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

686 Year

Year 686 (DCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 686 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

712 Year

Year 712 (DCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 712 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

700 Year

700 (DCC) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 700th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 700th year of the 1st millennium, the 100th and last year of the 7th century, and the 1st year of the 700s decade. As of the start of 700, the Gregorian calendar was 3 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time. The denomination 700 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 640 (DCXL) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 640 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

645 Year

Year 645 (DCXLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 645 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

656 Year

Year 656 (DCLVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 656 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

658 Year

Year 658 (DCLVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 658 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

675 Year

Year 675 (DCLXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 675 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

676 Year

Year 676 (DCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 676 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

695 Year

Year 695 (DCXCV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 695 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

References

  1. Roberts, J. M. (1994). History of the World. Penguin.
  2. 1 2 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle .