Cessna 182 Skylane

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Cessna 182 Skylane
Cessna182t skylane n2231f cotswoldairshow 2010 arp.jpg
RoleLight utility aircraft
National originUnited States
Manufacturer Cessna Aircraft Company
Introduction1956
StatusIn production
Produced1956–1985,
1996–2012,
2015–present
Number builtover 23,237 [1]
Developed from Cessna 180
1956 Cessna 182 on floats Cessna 182 N6453A.jpg
1956 Cessna 182 on floats
Cessna R182 Skylane RG, one of two variants with retractable landing gear N9106CAboveClouds.jpg
Cessna R182 Skylane RG, one of two variants with retractable landing gear
Cockpit of Cessna 182M Skylane Cessna 182D Skylane Cockpit.jpg
Cockpit of Cessna 182M Skylane
1958 Cessna 182A landing Cessna182A.jpg
1958 Cessna 182A landing
1967 model Cessna 182K belonging to the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association Cessna182C-FVSO01.jpg
1967 model Cessna 182K belonging to the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association
A Cessna 182P Cessna 182P.jpg
A Cessna 182P
Reims Cessna F182Q Cessna.f182q.g-blew.arp.cc.jpg
Reims Cessna F182Q
Cessna 182Q fitted with the SMA SR305-230 engine Cessna 182Q F-HBFC SMA.jpg
Cessna 182Q fitted with the SMA SR305-230 engine
Cessna T182T Cessna T182T At Centennial.jpg
Cessna T182T
Cessna 182J Cessna.182j.g-atpt.arp.jpg
Cessna 182J
1981 Cessna 182R Skylane Cessna.182.g-iseh.arp.750pix.jpg
1981 Cessna 182R Skylane
T182T cockpit with Garmin G1000 Cessna T182T Cockpit - Garmin G1000.jpg
T182T cockpit with Garmin G1000

The Cessna 182 Skylane is an American four-seat, single-engined light airplane, built by Cessna of Wichita, Kansas. It has the option of adding two child seats, installed in the baggage area.

Contents

Introduced in 1956, the 182 has been produced in a number of variants, including a version with retractable landing gear, and is the second most popular Cessna model still in production, after the 172.

Development

The Cessna 182 was introduced in 1956 as a tricycle gear variant of the 180. In 1957, the 182A variant was introduced along with the name Skylane. As production continued, later models were improved regularly with features such as a wider fuselage, swept tailfin with rear "omni-vision" window, enlarged baggage compartment, higher gross weights, landing gear changes, etc. The "restart" aircraft built after 1996 were different in many other details including a different engine, new seating design, etc.[ citation needed ]

By mid-2013, Cessna planned to introduce the next model of the 182T, the JT-A, using the 227 hp (169 kW) SMA SR305-230 diesel engine running on Jet-A with a burn rate of 11 U.S. gallons (42 L; 9.2 imp gal) per hour and cruise at 155 kn (287 km/h). [2] [3] Cessna has no timeline for the JT-A and the diesel 172. [4] The normally aspirated, avgas fueled 182 went out of production in 2012, but came back in 2015. [5]

Cessna 182s were also built in Argentina by DINFIA (called A182), and by Reims Aviation, France, as the F182.

Design

The Cessna 182 is an all-metal (mostly aluminum alloy) aircraft, although some parts such as engine cowling nosebowl and wingtips are made of fiberglass or thermoplastic material. Its wing has the same planform as the smaller Cessna 172 and the larger 205/206 series; however, some wing details such as flap and aileron design are the same as the 172 and are not like the 205/206 components.

Retractable gear

The retractable gear R182 and TR182 were offered from 1978 to 1986, without and with engine turbocharging respectively. The model designation nomenclature differs from some other Cessna models with optional retractable gear. For instance the retractable version of the Cessna 172 was designated as the 172RG, whereas the retractable gear version of the Cessna 182 is the R182. Cessna gave the R182 the marketing name of "Skylane RG". [6]

The R182 and TR182 offer 10-15% improvement in climb and cruise speeds over their fixed gear counterparts or, alternatively, 10-15% better fuel economy at the same speeds at the expense of increased maintenance costs and decreased gear robustness. The 1978 R182 has a sea level climb rate of 1140 fpm and cruising speed (75% BHP) at 7,500 feet (2,300 m) of 156 KTAS at standard temperature. [7]

The landing gear retraction system in the Skylane RG uses hydraulic actuators powered by an electrically driven pump. The system includes a gear position warning that emits an intermittent tone through the cabin speaker when the gear is in the retracted position and either the throttle is reduced below approximately 12" MAP (manifold pressure) or the flaps are extended beyond 20 degrees. In the event of a hydraulic pump failure, the landing gear may be lowered using a hand pump to pressurize the hydraulic system. The system does not, however, allow the landing gear to be manually retracted. [7]

Variants

182
Initial production version with fixed landing gear, four-seat light aircraft, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,550 lb (1,157 kg)most commonly used by the Civil Air Patrol[ citation needed ] and certified on 2 March 1956. [6]
182A Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 7 December 1956. [6]
182B Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 22 August 1958. [6]
182C Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 8 July 1959. [6]
182D Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 14 June 1960. [6]
182E Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 27 June 1961. [6]
182F Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 1 August 1962. [6]
182G Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 19 July 1963. [6]
182H Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 17 September 1964. [6]
182J Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 20 October 1965. [6]
182K Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 3 August 1966. [6]
182L Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 28 July 1967. [6]
182M Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 19 September 1968. [6] There was also an experimental version of this model with a full cantilever wing. [8]
182N Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R or O-470-S piston engine, gross weight 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for take-off and 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) for landing. Certified on 17 September 1969. [6]
182P Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R or O-470-S piston engine, gross weight 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) and certified on 8 October 1971. [6]
182Q Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-U piston engine, gross weight 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) and certified on 28 July 1976. [6] Significant changes were a change to a 24-V electrical system in model year 1978 at s/n 18265966 and a change from bladder to wet-wing fuel tanks in model year 1979 at s/n 18266591.[ citation needed ]
182R
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a carbureted 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-U piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for takeoff and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 29 August 1980. [6] This variant, along with the 182Q, can alternatively be equipped with the jet fuel burning SMA SR305-230 Diesel engine.
182S Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a fuel-injected 230 hp (172 kW) Lycoming IO-540-AB1A5 piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 3 October 1996. [6]
182T Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a fuel-injected 230 hp (172 kW) Lycoming IO-540-AB1A5 piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. It was certified on 23 February 2001 and, as of July 2015, it is the only variant in production. [6] [9]
R182 Skylane RG
Four-seat light aircraft with retractable landing gear, powered by a 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming O-540-J3C5D piston engine, gross weight 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) and certified on 7 July 1977. [6]
T182
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a turbocharged 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming O-540-L3C5D, piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 15 August 1980. [6]
T182T Skylane
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a turbocharged and fuel-injected 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming TIO-540-AK1A piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 23 February 2001. [6]
TR182 Turbo Skylane RG
Four-seat light aircraft with retractable landing gear, powered by a turbocharged 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming O-540-L3C5D piston engine, gross weight 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) and certified on 12 September 1978. [6]
T182JT-A Turbo Skylane JT-A
Four-seat light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a 227 hp (169 kW) SMA SR305-230 diesel engine, it burns 11 U.S. gallons (42 L; 9.2 imp gal) per hour of Jet-A fuel and cruises at 156 kn (289 km/h). The model was first flown in May 2013, and as of July 2015, FAA certification is on hold indefinitely. [9] Originally introduced as the Turbo Skylane NXT, Cessna changed the name to avoid confusion with the Remos NXT. [3] [10] [11]
Robertson STOL 182
An aftermarket 182 STOL conversion certified in 1967 that changes the leading edge shape and aileron controls and lowers the stall speed below 35 mph (56 km/h). [12]

Operators

Civil users

The 182 is used by a multitude of civil operators, cadet organizations and flight schools worldwide.

Government operators

Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Flag of the United States.svg  United States

Military operators

Flag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
Flag of Belize.svg  Belize
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador
Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala [24]
Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg  United Arab Emirates
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Flag of Venezuela.svg  Venezuela

Specifications (Cessna 182T)

Data from Cessna and AOPA [27] [28]

General characteristics

Performance

See also

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

Related lists

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Cessna website lists 22,336 Skylanes delivered up to 2007 plus 901 Turbo Skylanes delivered up to 2007. It does not indicate whether these numbers include the retractable-gear 182s, which are no longer in production and therefore are not discussed on their webpage. It also does not (as of 14 May 2009) list the 2008 delivery totals.
  2. Thomas B Haines (October 2012). "Jet A for your Skylane". AOPA Pilot.
  3. 1 2 Grady, Mary (22 July 2012). "Cessna Unveils Jet A Engine For Skylane". AVweb. Retrieved 24 July 2012.
  4. Bertorelli, Paul (12 May 2015). "Has Cessna Suddenly Grown Cold On Diesel?". AVweb. Aviation Publishing Group. Retrieved 13 May 2015.
  5. Pope, Stephen (14 May 2015). "Gas-Powered Cessna 182 Back in Production". Flying . Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Federal Aviation Administration (April 2009). "TYPE CERTIFICATE DATA SHEET NO. 3A13 Revision 69" (PDF). Retrieved 23 March 2010.
  7. 1 2 Cessna Aircraft Company (October 1977). Pilot's Operating Handbook, Skylane RG, 1978 Model R182.
  8. Phillips, Edward H: Wings of Cessna, Model 120 to the Citation III, Flying Books, 1986. ISBN   0-911139-05-2
  9. 1 2 Marsh, Alton; Twombly, Ian (14 May 2015). "Cessna halts orders for diesel Cessna 182". AOPA.org. Retrieved 18 July 2015.
  10. Cessna (n.d.). "Cessna 182JT-A Sheet" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-09-07. Retrieved 9 September 2012.
  11. Pew, Glenn (22 May 2013). "Cessna's Jet-A Skylane Flies". AVweb. Retrieved 23 May 2013.
  12. Plane and Pilot. July 1967.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  13. Rivas 2020, pp. 80–81
  14. "Belgische politie". polfed-fedpol.be. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  15. Transport Canada (December 2011). "Canadian Civil Aircraft Register" . Retrieved 2 December 2011.
  16. "Civil Air Patrol, Annual Report to Congress, 2008" (PDF). Civil Air Patrol. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 March 2013. Retrieved 1 October 2012. With 118 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAP’s fleet, more and more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessna’s state-of-the-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment.
  17. "FBI behind mysterious surveillance aircraft over US cities - StarTribune.com". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on 2 June 2015. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  18. "Does The FBI Have A Fleet Of Surveillance Cessnas?". AVweb. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  19. "Mysterious low-flying plane over Twin Cities raises eyebrows - StarTribune.com". Star Tribune. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  20. "Afghan air force receives first three Cessna planes". kansas. Archived from the original on 12 May 2014. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  21. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Taylor, Michael: Encyclopedia of Modern Military Aircraft, page 67. Bison Books, 1987. ISBN   0-8317-2808-6
  22. "BDFAW Patch Air Wing Belize Defence Force Crest Defender Patch".
  23. Air Force Public Affairs / Department of National Defence (April 2004). "Cessna L-182 (L-19L)". Archived from the original on 2007-11-15. Retrieved 2007-12-30.
  24. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Krivinyi, Nikolaus: World Military Aviation, page 148. Arco Publishing Co, 1977. ISBN   0-668-04348-2
  25. "Peace Research Institute". Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. 2010. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  26. Simpson Air International May 2000, p. 296.
  27. "Cessna Skylane Specifications". Cessna Corporation. Archived from the original on 2009-08-02. Retrieved 2009-07-28.
  28. BOATMAN, JULIE (March 2004). "Cessna 182T – Setting the Standard". AOPA Pilot. AOPA. Retrieved 2006-10-02.

Bibliography