Drava Banovina

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Drava Banovina
Dravska banovina
Дравска бановина
Banovina of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia
1929–1941
Locator map Drava Banovina in Yugoslavia 1929-1939.svg
Drava Banovina (red) within
Kingdom of Yugoslavia (light yellow)
Capital Ljubljana
Area 
 1931
15,849 km2 (6,119 sq mi)
Population 
 1921
1,060,356
 1931
1,144,298
Historical eraInterwar period
 Established
3 October 1929
 Disestablished
16 April 1941
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Flag of Krain.svg Duchy of Carniola
Socialist Republic of Slovenia Flag of Slovenia (1945-1991).svg
Today part ofFlag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia

The Drava Banovina or Drava Banate (Slovene : Dravska banovina, Serbo-Croatian : Dravska banovina / Дравска бановина), was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. This province consisted of most of present-day Slovenia and was named for the Drava River. The capital city of the Drava Banovina was Ljubljana.

Contents

Borders

According to the 1931 Constitution of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia,

The Drava Banovina is bounded by a line passing from the point where the northern boundary of the district of Čabar cuts the State frontier, then following the State frontier with Italy, Austria and Hungary to a point where the State frontier with Hungary reaches the river Mura (north-east of Čakovec). From the river Mura, the boundary of the Banovina follows the eastern and then the southern boundaries; of the districts of Lendava, Ljutomer, Ptuj, Šmarje, Brežice, Krško, Novo Mesto, Metlika, Črnomelj, Kočevje and Logatec, including all the districts mentioned.

[1]
The building that housed the administrative seat of Banovina today serves as the Government Building and President's Office of Slovenia Presidential Palace. Ljubljana.jpg
The building that housed the administrative seat of Banovina today serves as the Government Building and President's Office of Slovenia
Map of the Drava Banovina Dravska lat.png
Map of the Drava Banovina

Administration

The Drava Banovina was administratively subdivided into 29 counties (called srez):

Aftermath

In 1941 the World War II Axis powers occupied the Drava Banovina, and it was divided largely between Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy, while Hungary occupied Prekmurje and the Independent State of Croatia occupied some smaller border areas.

Following World War II the region was reconstituted, with additional pre–World War II Italian territory (Julian March), as the Federal State of Slovenia, within a federal second Yugoslavia.

List of Bans

The following is the list of people who held the title of Ban (governor) of Drava Banovina: [2]

PortraitName
(Born-Died)
Term of officeParty
StartEnd
Dusan Sernec 1930.jpg Dušan Sernec
(1882–1952)
9 October
1929
4 December
1930
Slovene People's Party (SLS)
Drago Marusic 1930s.jpg Drago Marušič
(1884–1964)
4 December
1930
8 February
1935
Yugoslav National Party (JNS)
Dinko Puc 1930s.jpg Dinko Puc
(1879–1945)
8 February
1935
10 September
1935
Yugoslav Democratic Party (JDS)
Marko Natlacen.jpg Marko Natlačen
(1886–1942)
10 September
1935
16 April
1941
Slovene People's Party (SLS)

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References

  1. The Constitution of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia
  2. Cahoon, Ben. "Slovenia". World Statesmen.org. Retrieved 9 September 2013.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Drava Banovina at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 46°2′59.18″N14°30′23.68″E / 46.0497722°N 14.5065778°E / 46.0497722; 14.5065778