Slovenian Parliament

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Slovenian Parliament

Slovenski parlament
Coat of arms of Slovenia.svg
Type
Type
Houses National Assembly
National Council
Leadership
Seats130 members
90 members (of which 1 is representing Italian and 1 Hungarian minority)
40 councilors
Meeting place
National Assembly Building Ljubljana
Website
www.dz-rs.si
www.ds-rs.si

The Slovenian Parliament (Slovene : Slovenski parlament) is the informal designation of the general representative body of the Slovenian nation and the legislative body of the Republic of Slovenia.

According to the Constitution of Slovenia, the general representative body of the Slovenian nation is the National Assembly. The general public in Slovenia often refer to the National Assembly alone as the Slovenian Parliament. [1] However, the National Council, the representative body of basic social groups, also performs a further, if minor, part of the legislative function. [2]

The opinions of experts and of the general Slovenian public on whether the Slovenian Parliament is bicameral or unicameral differ, although most consider it to be incompletely bicameral. [3] [4] In 2008, the Constitutional Court of Slovenia recognized the Slovenian Parliament as incompletely bicameral. [5]

Seat

The National Assembly and the National Council convene in a modernist palace known as the "Slovenian Parliament" and sited in Republic Square, Ljubljana. It was built between 1954 and 1959 by the architect Vinko Glanz  [ sl ]. An unrealized project for a Slovenian Parliament building, designed by the architect Jože Plečnik in the late 1940s, features on the Slovenian euro coins.

See also

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National Assembly Building of Slovenia

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References

  1. "Državni svet: pogosto jabolko spora" [National Council: A Frequent Apple of Discord] (in Slovenian). MMC RTV Slovenija. 14 January 2009. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  2. Veljković, Božidar; Melita Stiplošek; Natalija Ulaga; Monika Koražija (2006). Državni svet - del slovenskega parlamenta? [National Council - a Part of Slovenian Parliament?](PDF) (in Slovenian and English). Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  3. Lakota, Igor (2006). Sistem nepopolne dvodomnosti v slovenskem parlamentu (diplomska naloga) [The system of incomplete bicameralism in the Slovenian Parliament (diploma thesis)](PDF) (in Slovenian). Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ljubljana. p. 62. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  4. Mojmir Mrak; Matija Rojec; Carlos Silva-Jáuregui; World Bank (2004). "The Legislative Branch". Slovenia: From Yugoslavia to the European Union . World Bank Publications. pp.  56–57. ISBN   9780821357187 . Retrieved 16 December 2010. slovenia incomplete bicameral.
  5. "U-I-295/07-8" (in Slovenian). Constitutional Court of the Republic of Slovenia. 22 October 2008. Retrieved 16 December 2010. S tega vidika lahko govorimo o nepopolni dvodomnosti slovenskega parlamenta, kajti po ustavnopravni teoriji se šteje za dvodomno vsaka ureditev, v kateri delujeta na področju zakonodajne funkcije dva organa, ne glede na to, kakšno razmerje je med njima.

Coordinates: 46°03′06″N14°30′04″E / 46.05167°N 14.50111°E / 46.05167; 14.50111