Edgeplay

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A submissive man is consoled by his mistress after she has made his back bloody through massive beating. Femdom bloody back.jpg
A submissive man is consoled by his mistress after she has made his back bloody through massive beating.

In BDSM, edgeplay is a subjective term for activity (sexual or mentally manipulative) that may challenge the conventional S.S.C. (safe, sane and consensual) scheme; if one is aware of the risks and consequences and is willing to accept them, then the activity is considered RACK (risk-aware consensual kink).

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Edgeplay may involve the consequences of potential short- or long-term harm or death, exemplified by activities such as breathplay (erotic asphyxiation), fire play, knife play, fear play, temperature play, wax play and gunplay, as well as the potential increased risk of disease seroconverting when the risk of bodily fluid exchange is present, such as with cutting, bloodplay, or barebacking.

The mindset of those involved constitutes what is edgeplay because knowledge of or experience with the activity or partner(s) may dictate what and to what extent they will act. The propriety for more dangerous or taboo-themed activities varies by individual, due to differences in moralities as well as trust between participants and experience. The only consistent rule of edgeplay is that activities (including in sadomasochism) must not be coercive, deceitful, or injurious without prior agreement or knowledge. This does exclude how others may react to the outcome(s) of the activity if they go beyond what can be handled by the partners.

In the mid-1990s, the Living in Leather convention did not have discussion on ageplay, salirophilia or scat because, at the time, they were considered too extreme for consensual activity. By 2000, some considered them to be within the scope of edgeplay. [1]

See also

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Human sexual activity Human behaviour that is sexually motivated

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Risk-aware consensual kink

Risk-aware consensual kink is an acronym used by some of the BDSM community to describe a philosophical view that is generally permissive of certain risky sexual behaviors, as long as the participants are fully aware of the risks. This is often viewed in contrast to safe, sane, and consensual which generally holds that only activities that are considered safe, sane, and consensual are permitted.

Sadomasochism Giving or receiving of pleasure from acts involving the receipt or infliction of pain or humiliation

Sadomasochism is the giving and receiving of pleasure from acts involving the receipt or infliction of pain or humiliation. Practitioners of sadomasochism may seek sexual gratification from their acts. While the terms sadist and masochist refer respectively to one who enjoys giving and receiving pain, practitioners of sadomasochism may switch between activity and passivity.

Play piercing

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Knife play is a form of consensual BDSM edgeplay involving knives, daggers, and swords as a source of physical and mental stimulation. Knives are typically used to cut away clothing, scratch the skin, remove wax after wax play, or simply provide sensual stimulation. Knife play can also be a form of temperature play or body modification.

Glossary of BDSM Wikipedia glossary

This glossary of BDSM terms defines terms commonly used in the BDSM community.

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Erotic humiliation Consensual use of humiliation in a sexual context

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Erotic sensation play is a class of activities meant to impart physical sensations upon a partner, as opposed to mental forms of erotic play such as power exchange or sexual roleplaying.

Consent (BDSM)

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Kink (sexuality) Non-normative sexual behavior

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Master/slave (BDSM) consensual authority-exchange structured sexual relationship

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BDSM and the law

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Index of BDSM articles

This is an index of BDSM articles. BDSM is a variety of erotic practices involving dominance and submission, role-playing, restraint, and other interpersonal dynamics. Given the wide range of practices, some of which may be engaged in by people who do not consider themselves as practicing BDSM, inclusion in the BDSM community or subculture is usually dependent on self-identification and shared experience. Interest in BDSM can range from one-time experimentation to a lifestyle.

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