Electoral district of Leederville

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Leederville
Western AustraliaLegislative Assembly
State Western Australia
Dates current1911–1962
Namesake Leederville
Demographic North Metropolitan

The Electoral district of Leederville was a Legislative Assembly electorate in the state of Western Australia. The district was named for the inner northern Perth suburb of Leederville, which fell within its borders. Starting off as a vast seat covering most of Perth's northwestern hinterland, it shrank in size at various redistributions until, by the time of its abolishment, it was an inner suburban seat able to be absorbed into Wembley and Mount Hawthorn.

Western Australian Legislative Assembly legislature of the State of Western Australia

The Western Australian Legislative Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of Western Australia, an Australian state. The Parliament sits in Parliament House in the Western Australian capital, Perth.

The Western Australian Legislative Assembly is elected from 59 single-member electoral districts. These districts are often referred to as electorates or seats.

States and territories of Australia first-level subdivision of Australia

Government in the Commonwealth of Australia is exercised on three levels: federal, states and territories, and local government.

Contents

Leederville was largely created out of the abolished Balcatta by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1911, and its first member, elected at the 1911 state election, was the former member for Balcatta, Labor's Frederick Gill. He was defeated in the 1914 election by just 81 votes by another former Balcatta member, the Liberal candidate John Veryard. The seat was won back for Labor by Harry Millington on his second attempt. Millington went on to serve in the Collier Ministry.

Electoral district of Balcatta state electoral district of Western Australia

Balcatta is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of Western Australia.

1911 Western Australian state election state election in Western Australia in 1911

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 3 October 1911 to elect 50 members to the Western Australian Legislative Assembly. The Labor Party, led by Opposition Leader John Scaddan, defeated the conservative Ministerialist government led by Premier Frank Wilson. In doing so, Scaddan achieved Labor's first absolute majority on the floor of the Assembly and, with 68% of the seats, set a record for Labor's biggest majority in Western Australia. The record would stand for nearly 106 years until Labor won 69% of seats at the 2017 election. The result came as something of a surprise to many commentators and particularly to the Ministerialists, as they went to an election for the first time as a single grouping backed by John Forrest's Western Australian Liberal League, under a new system of compulsory preferential voting and new electoral boundaries both of which had been passed by Parliament earlier in the year despite ardent Labor opposition.

Frederick Gill was an Australian politician who was a Labor Party member of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia from 1904 to 1905 and again from 1908 to 1914.

The Redistribution of Seats Act 1929, which took effect at the 1930 election, abolished many Goldfields seats whilst creating a number of new metropolitan seats. Millington ran for and won the new seat of Mount Hawthorn, whilst the Labor member for Menzies, Alexander Panton, and the Nationalist (formerly National Labor) member for Mount Margaret, George Taylor, were in the unusual position of battling for the metropolitan seat of Leederville. Panton won, and in 1938 was elevated to the Ministry under Premier John Willcock.

1930 Western Australian state election

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 12 April 1930 to elect all 50 members to the Legislative Assembly. The incumbent Labor Party government, led by Premier Philip Collier, was defeated by the Nationalist-Country opposition, led by Opposition Leader James Mitchell.

Goldfields-Esperance region of Western Australia

The Goldfields-Esperance region is one of the nine regions of Western Australia. It is located in the south eastern corner of Western Australia, and comprises the local government areas of Coolgardie, Dundas, Esperance, Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Laverton, Leonora, Menzies, Ngaanyatjarraku and Ravensthorpe.

The Electoral district of Mount Hawthorn was a Legislative Assembly electorate in the state of Western Australia. The district was named for the inner northern Perth suburb of Mount Hawthorn, which fell within its borders.

A redistribution ahead of the 1950 election turned Leederville into an inner metropolitan seat, with the growing outer reaches of the seat becoming the new seat of Wembley Beaches. Following Panton's death on Christmas Day 1951, Labor candidate Ted Johnson won the seat. However, at the 1959 election, he lost to the Liberal Country League's Guy Henn, who held the seat until its abolishment prior to the 1962 election, and then transferred to the new seat of Wembley which contained most of the former seat's residents, the rest of whom had been transferred into the relatively safe Labor seat of Mount Hawthorn.

1950 Western Australian state election

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 25 March 1950 to elect all 50 members to the Legislative Assembly. The Liberal-Country coalition government, led by Premier Ross McLarty, won a second term in office against the Labor Party, led by Opposition Leader Frank Wise.

The Electoral district of Wembley Beaches was a Legislative Assembly electorate in the state of Western Australia. The district was named for the inner western Perth suburb of Wembley, which fell within its borders.

Stephen Edward Ingram "Ted" Johnson was an Australian politician.

Members for Leederville

MemberPartyTerm
  Frederick Gill Labor 1911–1914
  John Veryard Liberal 1914–1917
  Nationalist 1917–1921
  Lionel Carter Nationalist1921–1924
  Harry Millington Labor1924–1930
  Alexander Panton Labor1930–1951
  Ted Johnson Labor1952–1959
  Guy Henn LCL 1959–1962

See also

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