Electoral district of Mount Margaret

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Mount Margaret
Western AustraliaLegislative Assembly
State Western Australia
Dates current1901–1930
Namesake Mount Margaret

Mount Margaret was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of Western Australia from 1901 to 1930, located in what is now the Shire of Laverton in the northeastern Goldfields region.

The Western Australian Legislative Assembly is elected from 59 single-member electoral districts. These districts are often referred to as electorates or seats.

Western Australian Legislative Assembly legislature of the State of Western Australia

The Western Australian Legislative Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of Western Australia, an Australian state. The Parliament sits in Parliament House in the Western Australian capital, Perth.

Shire of Laverton Local government area in Western Australia

The Shire of Laverton is a local government area in the Goldfields-Esperance region of Western Australia, about 370 kilometres (230 mi) northeast of the city of Kalgoorlie and about 950 kilometres (590 mi) east-northeast of the state capital, Perth. The Shire covers an area of 179,798 square kilometres (69,420 sq mi), and its seat of government is the town of Laverton.

The district had just the one member over the course of its 29-year existence. George 'Mulga' Taylor was first elected as the Labor Party candidate for seat at the 1901 state election. He later left the Labor Party with several other pro-conscriptionists during World War I, eventually ending his tenure in parliament as a member of the Nationalist Party.

George Taylor (Australian politician) (1861-1935) shearer, prospector and politician

George "Mulga" Taylor was an Australian labour leader and politician who was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia from 1901 to 1930. He was a minister in the government of Henry Daglish, and later served as Speaker of the Legislative Assembly from 1917 to 1924.

Australian Labor Party (Western Australian Branch) Western Australian state branch of the Australian Labor Party

The Australian Labor Party , commonly known as WA Labor, is the Western Australian branch of the Australian Labor Party. It is the current governing party of Western Australia since winning the 2017 election under Mark McGowan.

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 24 April 1901 to elect 50 members to the Western Australian Legislative Assembly. It was the first election to take place since responsible government without the towering presence of Premier Sir John Forrest, who had left state politics two months earlier to enter the first Federal parliament representing the Division of Swan, and the first state parliamentary election to follow the enactment of women's suffrage in 1899.

Members

MembersPartyTerm
  George Taylor Labor 1901–1917
  National Labor 1917–1924
  Nationalist 1924–1930


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