FIFA World Cup All-Time Team

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The FIFA All-Time Team is a fictive all-time association football team published by FIFA in 1994. [1] [2] It is an eleven-member side divided as one goalkeeper, four defenders, three midfielders, and three forwards.

Association football Team field sport played between two teams of eleven players with spherical ball

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is a non-profit organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball. It is the highest governing body of football.

Goalkeeper (association football) position in association football

The goalkeeper, often shortened to keeper or goalie, is one of the major positions of association football. It is the most specialised position in the sport. The goalkeeper's primary role is to prevent the opposing team from scoring. This is accomplished by the goalkeeper moving into the path of the ball and either catching it or directing it away from the vicinity of the goal line. Within the penalty area goalkeepers are able to use their hands, making them the only players on the field permitted to handle the ball. The special status of goalkeepers is indicated by them wearing different coloured kits from their teammates.

Position Player [1] National side(s) represented by FIFA World Cup edition
Goalkeeper Lev Yashin Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union (1958, 1962, 1966, 1970)
Defender (fullback) Djalma Santos Flag of Brazil (1960-1968).svg  Brazil (1954, 1958, 1962, 1966)
Defender (centre-back) Franz Beckenbauer Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany (1966, 1970, 1974)
Defender (centre-back) Bobby Moore Flag of England.svg  England (1962, 1966, 1970)
Defender (fullback) Paul Breitner Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany (1974, 1982)
Midfielder Johan Cruyff Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (1974)
Midfielder Michel Platini Flag of France.svg  France (1978, 1982, 1986)
Midfielder Bobby Charlton Flag of England.svg  England (1958, 1962, 1966, 1970)
Forward Garrincha Flag of Brazil (1960-1968).svg  Brazil (1958, 1962, 1966)
Forward Pelé Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil (1958, 1962, 1966, 1970)
Forward Ferenc Puskás Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary (1954)
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain (1962)

See also

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