Football at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament

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Football at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament
Olympic rings without rims.svg
Tournament details
Host countryAustralia
Dates15 – 28 September
Teams8 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)5 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Norway.svg  Norway (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Third placeFlag of Germany.svg  Germany
Fourth placeFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored42 (2.63 per match)
Attendance326,215 (20,388 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen (4 goals)
1996
2004

A women's Olympic Football Tournament was held for the second time as part of the 2000 Summer Olympics. [1] [2] The tournament features 8 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 8 teams are drawn into two groups of four and each group plays a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the semi-finals and culminating with the gold medal match at Sydney Football Stadium on 28 September 2000.

Football at the Summer Olympics

Football at the Summer Olympics, commonly known as football or soccer has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program at the 1996 Atlanta Games.

2000 Summer Olympics Games of the XXVII Olympiad, held in Sydney in 2000

The 2000 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad and commonly known as Sydney 2000 or the Millennium Olympic Games/Games of the New Millennium, were an international multi-sport event which was held between 15 September and 1 October 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It was the second time that the Summer Olympics were held in Australia, and also the Southern Hemisphere, the first being in Melbourne, Victoria, in 1956.

A round-robin tournament is a competition in which each contestant meets all other contestants in turn. A round-robin contrasts with an elimination tournament, in which participants are eliminated after a certain number of losses.

Contents

Medal winners

GoldSilverBronze
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)
Gro Espeseth
Bente Nordby
Marianne Pettersen
Hege Riise
Kristin Bekkevold
Ragnhild Gulbrandsen
Solveig Gulbrandsen
Margunn Haugenes
Ingeborg Hovland
Christine Bøe Jensen
Silje Jørgensen
Monica Knudsen
Gøril Kringen
Anne Tønnessen
Unni Lehn
Dagny Mellgren
Anita Rapp
Brit Sandaune
Bente Kvitland
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)
Brandi Chastain
Joy Fawcett
Julie Foudy
Mia Hamm
Michelle French
Kristine Lilly
Tiffeny Milbrett
Carla Overbeck
Cindy Parlow
Briana Scurry
Lorrie Fair
Shannon MacMillan
Siri Mullinix
Christie Pearce
Nikki Serlenga
Danielle Slaton
Kate Sobrero
Sara Whalen
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)
Ariane Hingst
Melanie Hoffmann
Steffi Jones
Renate Lingor
Maren Meinert
Sandra Minnert
Claudia Müller
Birgit Prinz
Silke Rottenberg
Kerstin Stegemann
Bettina Wiegmann
Tina Wunderlich
Nicole Brandebusemeyer
Nadine Angerer
Doris Fitschen
Jeannette Götte
Stefanie Gottschlich
Inka Grings

Venues

Three venues were used during the tournament, two of them outside of Sydney at cities around Australia. The Finals and the Gold Medal match were held at the Sydney Football Stadium.

Sydney Football Stadium

The Sydney Football Stadium, commercially known as Allianz Stadium and previously Aussie Stadium, was a football stadium in Moore Park, Sydney, Australia. Built in 1988 next to the Sydney Cricket Ground, the stadium was Sydney's premier rectangular field venue for rugby league, rugby union, and football.

Sydney Melbourne Canberra
Sydney Football Stadium Melbourne Cricket Ground Bruce Stadium
Capacity: 42,500Capacity: 98,000Capacity: 25,011
Allianz Stadium - 13 October 2012.jpg MCG stadium.jpg BruceStadium19032005.JPG

Qualification

The seven best teams at the Women's World Cup in 1999 and the host nation Australia were automatically selected for the Olympic tournament. The following eight teams qualified for the 2000 Olympic women's football tournament:

1999 FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup was the third edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was hosted by the United States and took place from 19 June to 10 July 1999 at eight venues across the country. The tournament was the most successful edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup in terms of attendance, television ratings, and public interest.

Seeding

Pot 1Pot 2

Squads

Match officials

First round

Group E

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 330061+59
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 320153+26
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 30121431
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 30122641
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg0 3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report Grings 39'
Wiegmann 70'
Lingor 90+'
Bruce Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 24,800
Referee: Bola Abidoye (Nigeria)

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg0 2Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Report Pretinha 21'
Kátia 70'

Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg1 1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Salisbury 57' Report Andersson 66' (pen.)
Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 33,600
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2 1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Prinz 33', 41' Report Raquel 72'
Bruce Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 17,000
Referee: Martha Toro (Colombia)

Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg1 2Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Hughes 33' Report Raquel 56'
Kátia 64'
Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 29,400
Referee: Vibeke Karlsen (Norway)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1 0Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Hingst 88' Report

Group F

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 321062+47
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 320154+16
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 311154+14
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 30033960
United States  Flag of the United States.svg2 0Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Milbrett 18'
Hamm 24'
Report

China  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg3 1Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Zhao 12'
Sun 57', 83'
Report Nkwocha 85' (pen.)
Bruce Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 16,000
Referee: Martha Toro (Colombia)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg1 1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Foudy 38' Report Sun 67'

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg3 1Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Mellgren 22'
Riise 62' (pen.)
Pettersen 90'+
Report Akide 78'
Bruce Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 9,150
Referee: Tammy Ogston (Australia)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg3 1Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Chastain 26'
Lilly 35'
MacMillan 56'
Report Akide 48'

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg2 1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Pettersen 55'
Haugenes 78'
Report Sun 75' (pen.)
Bruce Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 11,532
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Knockout stages

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
24 September - Sydney
 
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1
 
28 September - Sydney
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3
 
24 September - Canberra
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1
 
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0
 
Third place
 
 
28 September - Sydney
 
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 2
 
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0

Semi-finals

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg0 1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report Wunderlich 80' (o.g.)
Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 16,710
Referee: Im Eun Ju (South Korea)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg1 0Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Hamm 60' Report
Bruce Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 11,000
Referee: Nicole Petignat (Switzerland)

Bronze Medal match

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2 0Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Lingor 64'
Prinz 79'
Report
Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 11,200
Referee: Im Eun Ju (South Korea)

Gold Medal match

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg3 2 (a.e.t.)Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Espeseth 44'
Gulbrandsen 78'
Mellgren 102'
Report Milbrett 5', 90+2'
Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 22,848
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

FIFA Fair play award

Goalscorers

With four goals, Sun Wen of China is the top scorer in the tournament. In total, 42 goals were scored by 28 different players, with only one of them credited as own goal.

4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goal

Final ranking

RankTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)540196+312
2Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)531195+410
3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)540182+612
4Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil  (BRA)520356–16
5Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)311154+14
6Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)301214-31
7Flag of Australia.svg  Australia  (AUS)301226–41
8Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria  (NGR)300339–60

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References

  1. "SYDNEY 2000: SOCCER; After a Wild, Intense Match, Norway Steals One From U.S. - New York Times". Nytimes.com. 29 September 2000. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  2. White, Joseph. "Norway Beats U.S. to Win Soccer Gold - ABC News". Abcnews.go.com. Retrieved 15 September 2012.