Lanzhou Military Region

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Lanzhou Military Region
Lanzhou Military Region.svg
Lanzhou Military Region (highlighted)
Simplified Chinese 兰州军区
Traditional Chinese 蘭州軍區
The garrison in Linxia City, Gansu 5759-Linxia-Wanshou-Guan-city-view-Military-unit.jpg
The garrison in Linxia City, Gansu

The Lanzhou Military Region was one of seven military regions in the People's Republic of China. It directed all People's Liberation Army and People's Armed Police forces in Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Ningxia, Shaanxi, and Ngari Prefecture in northwest Tibet. It was headquartered in Lanzhou in Gansu Province. It is bordered to the south by the Chengdu Military Region, and to the north by Mongolia, the Altai Republic, which is a political subdivision of the Russian Federation, and Kazakhstan. This region is now part of the Western Theater Command due to the military reforms of 2015.

Contents

In 2006 the International Institute for Strategic Studies attributed the Region with an estimated 220,000 personnel, a single armoured division, two motorised infantry divisions, one artillery division, one armoured, two motorised infantry, one artillery, one anti-aircraft brigades plus a single anti-tank regiment. [1]

The Region included two Group Armies (the 21st at Baoji and the 47th at Lintong) plus two Armed Police Units (the 7th and 63rd). The known smaller formations included the 12th Armoured Brigade ('84701 Unit') at Jiuquan, Gansu. The region also included the Xinjiang Military District, unusual among PRC military districts in that it contains a significant number of combat troops (the 4th Infantry Division, 6th Infantry Division, 8th Infantry Division, and, apparently, the 11th Highland Motorised Infantry Division reportedly either at Urumqi or in the Karakoram Mountains (Blasko 2000). [2]

The first, longest-serving and most influential Commander of the Region was Lieutenant General Zhang Dazhi, who held the post from 1955 to 1969, and then went on to become Central Commander of the PLA Artillery Forces from 1969 to 1977. [3]

Officers

Source: [4]

Tentative order of battle

In December 1949, when the Xinjiang (Provincial) Military Region was established, it directed three 'third-class' military regions (sanji junqu); Dihua (Urumchi), where the 6th Corps was based, Yining, the base for the 5th Corps, and Kashgar, the location of the 2nd Corps. [5] The 2nd Cavalry Division (III Formation) was stationed in the region between October 1962 and 1969.

Headquarters is located at Lanzhou

Scramble.nl says the 3rd Army Aviation Brigade (Wujiaqu) is part of the 47th Group Army. [9]

12th Artillery Division was previously with 47th Group Army.

Lanzhou Military Region Air Force

There are apparently command posts at Xi'an and Urumqi. In December 1964, the 9th Air Corps (kong 9 jun) was established in Wulumuqi [Ürümqi], but changed to the Xinjiang MRAF Command Post (junqu kongjun zhihuisuo) in November 1978. On 16 April 1979, it again changed its name to the Wulumuqi MRAF Command Post (junqu kongjun zhihuisuo). [10] Other divisions associated with the 9th Air Corps include the 37th Fighter Division with its headquarters probably at Urumqi.

Main source for this listing is Scramble.nl/cn.htm, accessed May 2012.

Globalsecurity.org indicates that the 6th Fighter Division was established in November 1950 at Anshan, Liaoning and initially comprised the 16th and 17th Regiments. China-Military.org indicates that the 6th Division gained the 139th Regiment from the deactivated 47th Division sometime in 1998. The 106th Air Regiment of the 36th Bomber Division disbanded in 2004.

Nickname

Organizations affiliated with the Lanzhou Military Region often use the nickname "combat" (Chinese :战斗; pinyin :zhàndòu; lit. 'battle fight'), including the Combat Performance Troupe (Chinese :战斗文工团), but not the People's Army Newspaper (Chinese :人民军队报), which is the sole exception among all five major military region newspapers in this regard.

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References

Citations

  1. International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance 2006
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-10-14. Retrieved 2009-10-16.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. Zhang Dazhi Biography, Jia County Official Website
  4. p. 25.
  5. Starr, S. Frederick (2015-03-04). Xinjiang: China's Muslim Borderland. Routledge. p. 130. ISBN   9781317451372.
  6. 1 2 Blasko, Dennis J. (2013). The Chinese Army Today: Tradition and Transformation for the 21st Century (2nd ed.). Routledge. p. 93.
  7. Blasko, Dennis J. (2013). The Chinese Army Today: Tradition and Transformation for the 21st Century (2nd ed.). Routledge.
  8. Blasko, Dennis J. (2006). The Chinese Army Today: Tradition and Transformation for the 21st Century. London & New York: Routledge. ISBN   0-415-77003-3.
  9. http://scramble.nl
  10. People's Liberation Army Air Force, Defense Intelligence Agency, DIC-1300-445-91, May 1991.

Sources

  • Chapter 8, PLA Ground Forces, by Dennis J Blasko, in The People's Liberation Army as Organisation, RAND, CF182, 2002.