Harbin Y-12

Last updated
Y-12
Iran - Revolutionary Guard Air Force Harbin Y12-II.jpg
Harbin Y-12 II of the Iranian IRGC
RoleTwin-engine turboprop utility aircraft
National originChina
Manufacturer Harbin Aircraft Industry Group
First flight14 July 1982
StatusActive, In production
Primary user People's Liberation Army Air Force
Produced1985 - present
Developed from Harbin Y-11

The Harbin Y-12 (Chinese :运-12; pinyin :Yùn-12) is a high wing twin-engine turboprop utility aircraft built by Harbin Aircraft Industry Group (HAIG).

Contents

Design and development

The Y-12 started as a development of the Harbin Y-11 airframe called Y-11T in 1980.[ citation needed ] The design featured numerous improvements including a redesigned wing with a new low drag section, a larger fuselage and bonded rather than riveted construction. It also replaced the radial piston engines with turboprops.[ citation needed ]

The prototype was followed by about 30 production Y-12 (I) aircraft before a revised version was produced. This was designated the Y-12 (II), which featured more powerful engines and removal of leading edge slats, first flying on 16 August 1984 and receiving Chinese certification in December of the following year. [1] The power plants are two Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-27 turboprops with Hartzell propellers. The Y-12 has a maximum takeoff weight of 5,700 kg (12,600 lb) with seating for 17 passengers and two crew. The aircraft is operated as a light commuter and transport aircraft.[ citation needed ]

The latest development is the Y-12F, which is almost a new design with many improvements: new wings, new landing gear, new fuselage, with more powerful engines from Pratt & Whitney Canada and extended payload and range. The Y-12F made its maiden flight on December 29, 2010, [2] received CAAC type certification on December 10, 2015, and FAA type certification on February 22, 2016. [3] In 2015, Kenmore Air announced that they would begin development of floats for the Y-12 for FAA certification. [4] The Y-12 completed the FAA evaluation flight tests for its automatic flight control system on June 30, 2018, with its performance meeting the requirements, said AVIC Harbin Aircraft Industry Company Ltd (AVIC HAFEI). [5]

Variants

Harbin Y-12 (II) at China Aviation Museum, Beijing Harbin Y-12 (II).jpg
Harbin Y-12 (II) at China Aviation Museum, Beijing
Harbin Y-12E Y12e.jpg
Harbin Y-12E
Harbin Y-12F AVIC Harbin Y12F.jpg
Harbin Y-12F

Operators

Military operators

Flag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan
Flag of Cambodia.svg  Cambodia
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Flag of Djibouti.svg  Djibouti
Flag of Eritrea.svg  Eritrea
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana
Flag of Guyana.svg  Guyana
Harbin Y-12 II of the Sri Lanka Air Force Sri Lanka 70th Independence - SLAF (cropped).jpg
Harbin Y-12 II of the Sri Lanka Air Force
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
Flag of Mali.svg  Mali
Flag of Mauritania.svg  Mauritania
Flag of Myanmar.svg  Myanmar
Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
Flag of Peru.svg  Peru
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia

Government operators

Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg  Republic of the Congo
Flag of Federated States of Micronesia.svg  Federated States of Micronesia
Flag of the Seychelles.svg  Seychelles

Civil operators

An Air Vanuatu Harbin Y-12 with revised wingtips YJAV5.JPG
An Air Vanuatu Harbin Y-12 with revised wingtips
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia
Flag of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.svg  Democratic Republic of the Congo
Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg  Republic of the Congo
Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran
Flag of Kiribati.svg  Kiribati
Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia
Flag of Federated States of Micronesia.svg  Federated States of Micronesia
Flag of Mongolia.svg  Mongolia
Flag of Nepal.svg    Nepal
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga
Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda

Accidents and incidents

Specifications (Y-12 (II))

Data from Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1999/2000, [46] Jane's all the World's Aircraft 2000–01 [47]

General characteristics

Performance

250 km/h (160 mph; 130 kn) (economical) at 3,000 m (9,843 ft)
3,000 m (9,843 ft) on one engine
1.4 m/s (4.6 ft/s) on one engine

See also

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

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References

Notes

  1. JWR Taylor 1988, p.38.
  2. 霍尼韦尔航空航天 (8 January 2016). "【纪录】运-12F背后的霍尼韦尔力量". CARNOC.com (民航资源网) (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 26 February 2016.
  3. 1 2 Ge, Lena (25 February 2016). "China-Made Y12F Turboprop Aircraft Gets FAA Type Certification". China Aviation Daily. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 26 February 2016.
  4. Stepen Trimble (2 October 2015). "AVIC launches seaplane conversion for Y-12". www.flightglobal.com. Flight International. Archived from the original on 13 February 2017. Retrieved 12 February 2017.
  5. 1 2 江巍. "China's Y-12 plane passes FAA flight tests for automatic flight control - Chinadaily.com.cn". www.chinadaily.com.cn. Archived from the original on 2018-07-07. Retrieved 2018-07-07.
  6. FAA Y-12 IV and Y-12E Type Certificate Archived 2015-03-22 at the Wayback Machine retrieved 17 August 2013.
  7. FAA Y-12 IV and Y-12E Type Certificate Archived 2015-03-22 at the Wayback Machine retrieved 12 November 2009.
  8. Francis, Leithen. "Harbin Y-12 turboprop to be bigger" Flight International 20 September 2007 (online version) Archived 31 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine retrieved 12 November 2009
  9. "ok365.com便民导航-最为便捷的上网导航服务". y-12.com.cn. Archived from the original on 10 January 2014. Retrieved 7 March 2016.
  10. "Y12F". 10 January 2014. Archived from the original on 10 January 2014.
  11. "World Air Forces 2021". FlightGlobal. 4 December 2020. Retrieved 5 January 2021.
  12. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 32.
  13. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 34.
  14. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 35.
  15. 1 2 Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 36.
  16. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 37.
  17. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 39.
  18. https://airrecognition.com/index.php/news/defense-aviation-news/2021/april/7231-kenya-air-force-commissioned-newly-acquired-c-145-skytruck-aircraft.html
  19. de Cherisey, Erwan (2 October 2017). "Mali receives new aircraft". IHS Jane's 360. Archived from the original on 3 October 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2017.
  20. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 40.
  21. 1 2 Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 41.
  22. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 43.
  23. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 44.
  24. Jackson 2003, p. 82.
  25. Hoyle Flight International 11–17 December 2012, p. 57.
  26. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 47.
  27. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 48.
  28. Hoyle Flight International 6–12 December 2016, p. 53.
  29. 1 2 3 4 5 Thisdell and Fafard Flight International 9–15 August 2016, p. 42.
  30. Xinhua (14 February 2018). "Two new Chinese-made planes delivered to Nepal". Archived from the original on 13 February 2018. Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  31. "Air Eagle". www.aireagle.pk. Archived from the original on 2017-05-17. Retrieved 2017-05-22.
  32. Hoyle Flight International 11–17 December 2012, p. 60.
  33. Accident descriptionfor RDPL-34117 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  34. Accident descriptionfor B-3822 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  35. Accident descriptionfor CR851 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  36. Accident descriptionfor JU-1020 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  37. Accident descriptionfor RDPL-34130 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  38. Accident descriptionfor AF-216 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  39. Accident descriptionfor 132 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  40. Accident descriptionfor B-3841 at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 20 January 2013.
  41. Harro Ranter (12 July 2012). "ASN Aircraft accident Harbin Yunshuji Y-12-II 5T-MAE Nouakchott Airport (NKC)". aviation-safety.net. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 4 August 2012.
  42. Accident descriptionfor registration unknown at the Aviation Safety Network . Retrieved on 5 June 2014.
  43. {AirForces Monthly, Issue 330}
  44. "Four air force personnel killed in aircraft crash at Haputale". Ada Derana . 3 January 2020. Retrieved 3 January 2020.
  45. "Kenya Air Force Harbin Y-12-II Aircraft Crash-landed At Somalia Airstrip". Fighter Jets World. 2020-08-04. Retrieved 2020-08-05.
  46. Taylor 1999, p.189
  47. Jackson, Paul, ed. (2000). Jane's all the World's Aircraft 2000–01 (91st ed.). Coulsdon, Surrey, United Kingdom: Jane's Information Group. pp. 71–72. ISBN   978-0710620118.

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