List of historical currencies

Last updated

Contents

This is a list of historical currencies.

Ancient Greece

Ancient Lebanon

Ancient Lydia

Ancient Persia

Ancient Rome

Ancient Europe

Ancient Israel

Ancient Armenia

Africa

Americas

Pre-colonial

Post-contact

Canada

  • 5-sol French coin and silver coins - New France
  • Spanish-American coins- unofficial
  • Playing cards - 1685-1760s, sometimes officially New France
  • 15 and a 30-deniers coin known as the mousquetaire - early 17th Century New France
  • Gold Louis - 1720 New France
  • Sol and Double Sol 1738-1764
  • English coins early 19th Century
  • Tokens and Army Bills - War of 1812
  • British Shinplaster 1870s
  • United States silver coins 1868-1869

Caribbean

Mexico

Asia

China

Taiwan

Iran

Japan

Korean

Malaya

Philippines

Vietnam

Historical money of Tibet

India

Other currencies

Oceania

Modern Europe

Transcaucasia

International

Related Research Articles

Decimalisation is the conversion of a system of currency or of weights and measures to units related by powers of 10.

Pound sterling Official currency of the United Kingdom and other territories

The pound sterling, known in some contexts simply as the pound or sterling, is the official currency of the United Kingdom, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, Gibraltar, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, the British Antarctic Territory, and Tristan da Cunha. It is subdivided into 100 pence. The "pound sterling" is the oldest currency in continuous use. Some nations that do not use sterling also have currencies called the pound.

Spanish dollar Former coin of the Spanish Empire

The Spanish dollar, also known as the piece of eight, is a silver coin of approximately 38 mm (1.5 in) diameter worth eight Spanish reales. It was minted in the Spanish Empire following a monetary reform in 1497. It was widely used as the first international currency because of its uniformity in standard and milling characteristics. Some countries countermarked the Spanish dollar so it could be used as their local currency.

Decimal Day 15 February 1971, when the UK and Ireland adopted decimal currency

Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.

£sd

£sd is the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies once common throughout Europe, especially in the British Isles and hence in several countries of the British Empire and subsequently the Commonwealth. The abbreviation originates from the Latin currency denominations librae, solidi, and denarii. In the United Kingdom, these were referred to as pounds, shillings, and pence.

Maltese lira Currency of Malta from 1825 until 31 December 2007

The lira or pound was the currency of Malta from 1972 until 31 December 2007. After 1986 the lira was abbreviated as Lm, although the original ₤M sign was often used locally. In English the currency was still frequently called the pound even after its official English language name was changed to lira.

Non-decimal currency

A non-decimal currency is a currency that has sub-units that are a non-decimal fraction of the main unit, i.e. the number of sub-units in a main unit is not a power of 10. Historically, most currencies were non-decimal, though today virtually all are now decimal.

Each "article" in this category is a collection of entries about several stamp issuers, presented in alphabetical order. The entries are formulated on the micro model and so provide summary information about all known issuers.

Each "article" in this category is a collection of entries about several stamp issuers, presented in alphabetical order. The entries are formulated on the micro model and so provide summary information about all known issuers.

Jamaican pound

The Jamaican pound was the official currency of Jamaica between 1840 and 1969. It circulated as a mixture of British currency and local issues and was always equal to the British pound. The Jamaican pound was also used by the Cayman Islands and Turks and Caicos Islands.

Bi-metallic coin Coin consisting of more than one metal or alloy

Bi-metallic coins are coins consisting of two (bi-) metals or alloys, generally arranged with an outer ring around a contrasting center. Common circulating examples include the €1, €2, United Kingdom £1 and £2, Canadian $2, South African R5, Turkish 1 lira and 50 kurus, IDR 1K, ₹10, 2 and 5 PLN, 50 CZK, 100 and 200 HUF, 1 and 2 BGN, Hong Kong $10, Argentine $1 and $2, Brazilian R$1, Chilean $100 and $500, Colombian $500 and $1000, and all Mexican coins of $1 or higher denomination.

Coin wrapper

A coin wrapper, sometimes known as a bank roll or roll, is a paper or plastic container for a number of coins.

British involvement in the Middle East began with the Aden Settlement in 1839. The British East India Company established an anti-piracy station in Aden to protect British shipping that was sailing to and from India. The Trucial States were similarly brought into the British Empire as a base for suppressing sea piracy in the Persian Gulf. Involvement in the region expanded to Egypt because of the Suez canal, as well as to Bahrain, Qatar, and Muscat. Kuwait was added in 1899 because of fears about the proposed Berlin-Baghdad Railway. There was a growing fear in the United Kingdom that Germany was a rising power, and there was concern about the implications of access to the Persian Gulf that would arise from the Berlin-Baghdad Railway. After the First World War the British influence in the Middle East reached its fullest extent with the inclusion of Palestine, Transjordan and Iraq.

Italy has a long history of different coinage types, which spans thousands of years. Italy has been influential at a coinage point of view: the florin, one of the most used coinage types in European history, was struck in Florence in the 13th century. Since Italy has been for centuries divided into many city-states, they all had different coinage systems, but when the country became unified in 1861, the Italian lira came into place, and was used until 2002. Today, Italy uses the Euro.