Monarchy New Zealand

Last updated
Monarchy New Zealand

Arikinui Aotearoa
ChairSean Palmer (since 2012)
Founded1995;25 years ago (1995)
(Incorporated 3 April 1996, unincorporated 18 April 2019)
Headquarters New Zealand
NewspaperCrown & Koru
Ideology Monarchism
Website
Monarchy New Zealand
Facebook

Monarchy New Zealand is a national, non-partisan, not-for-profit organisation whose purpose is to promote, support and defend the constitutional monarchy of New Zealand. In addition to the general public, the organisation's membership includes a number of academics as well as numerous lawyers and political figures. [1] It is currently chaired by Sean Palmer. [2] [3]

Contents

Aims and principles

According to its website, Monarchy New Zealand's aims and principles include: [4]

Crown & Koru

Crown & Koru is Monarchy New Zealand's newsletter, published one to two times a year. It features news relating to the monarchy of New Zealand and information about the organisation. [5] The journal was first published in 1998 [6] under the title Monarchy New Zealand; it changed its title to Crown & Koru in 2010, and became an online-only publication from 2015. [7]

History

The organisation formed as The Monarchist League of New Zealand in 1995 and incorporated in April 1996. [8] The founder was Merv Tilsley, and founding members included Professor Noel Cox (later a long-term Chairman of the organisation) and his brother, Auckland lawyer and vexillolographer John Cox, who later founded the New Zealand Flag Institute. [9] It was rebranded Monarchy New Zealand in 2010. [10]

In 2002, the group campaigned against the abolition of appeals to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and against the creation of the Supreme Court of New Zealand. [11] The group held a dinner to mark the Golden Jubilee of Elizabeth II on 9 June of that year. [12]

The group defended a private memo written by Prince Charles, Prince of Wales in November 2004, in which he stated:

"What is wrong with people nowadays? Why do they all seem to think they are qualified to do things far above their capabilities? It is a consequence of a child-centred education system which tells people they can become pop stars, high court judges or brilliant TV presenters or infinitely more competent heads of state without ever putting in the necessary work or having the natural ability."

The League said that the Prince was misinterpreted, and that "[t]he memo itself was understandable and quite proper in the context in which it was written." [13]

In 2009 the group welcomed the re-introduction of titular honours to the New Zealand Royal Honours system [14] after years of lobbying.[ citation needed ] Also in 2009 the group described the decision by John Key's National Government to allow the Tino rangatiratanga flag to fly from public buildings on Waitangi Day as "potentially divisive". [15]

In 2011 the group held a celebration in honour of the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton, with around 300 monarchy supporters watching and celebrating the London wedding at the Mercure Hotel in central Auckland. [16]

List of chairs

Former Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives, Sir Peter Tapsell, was patron of the organisation until his death in 2012.[ citation needed ]

Former Chair Simon O'Connor was elected to Parliament in November 2011. Former Vice-Chair Paul Foster-Bell was elected to Parliament in May 2013.

In April 2019, Monarchy New Zealand was dissolved as an incorporated society. [17]

Publications

See also

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References

  1. This is shown by the published names of members already visible e.g. Professor Noel Cox, a constitutional law expert was Chairman 2000-2010, as well as two MPs, being Patrons from different political parties.
  2. Monarchy New Zealand. "Executive of Monarchy New Zealand" . Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  3. "Monarchy or republic? The debate for NZ's head of state rages on". Stuff. Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  4. Monarchy New Zealand. "Aims of Monarchy New Zealand" . Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  5. Monarchy New Zealand. "Latest Journal" . Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  6. Zealand, Monarchist League of New Zealand (1 January 1998). "Monarchy New Zealand : the newsletter of the Monarchist League of New Zealand Incorporated". National Library of New Zealand. Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  7. National Library of New Zealand. "Monarchy New Zealand" . Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  8. Companies Office: Societies and Trusts online. Search for organisation number 715413. "Monarchy New Zealand" . Retrieved 5 July 2011.
  9. "Blomkamp-Cox Solicitors: Firm Profile". Blomkamp-Cox Solicitors. 9 January 2012. Archived from the original on 26 May 2010. Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  10. Monarchy New Zealand. "Crown and Koru: February 2010 Volume 15 Issue 0" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 July 2011. Retrieved 5 July 2011.
  11. Monarchist League of New Zealand (9 December 2002). "Monarchist League Against Supreme Court Law" . Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  12. "Monarchist League To Hold Golden Jubilee Dinner". Scoop.co.nz. 4 June 2002. Retrieved 22 August 2011.
  13. Monarchist League of New Zealand (22 November 2004). "Prince of Wales Misinterpreted Again". scoop.co.nz . Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  14. "Knighthoods restored". Scoop.co.nz. 28 March 2009. Retrieved 2 February 2012.
  15. "Maori Flag Decision Defended By Prime Minister". Radio New Zealand. 9 December 2009. Retrieved 24 January 2012.
  16. "Royals still relevant, claims Monarchy NZ". Newshub. 29 April 2011. Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  17. Office, Companies (18 May 2019). "Dissolution of incorporated societies notice published 18 April 2019 | Societies and Trusts". www.societies.govt.nz. Retrieved 7 May 2019.