Monolith

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Uluru, Northern Territory, Australia, is often referred to as the biggest monolith, but that is generally avoided by geologists. While the surrounding rocks were eroded, the rock survived as sandstone strata making up the surviving Uluru 'monolith'. Uluru, helicopter view, cropped.jpg
Uluru, Northern Territory, Australia, is often referred to as the biggest monolith, but that is generally avoided by geologists. While the surrounding rocks were eroded, the rock survived as sandstone strata making up the surviving Uluru 'monolith'.
Monolithos fortress on Rhodes, Greece Monolithos 1.jpg
Monolithos fortress on Rhodes, Greece
Landsat 7 image Brandberg Mountain, Namibia Brand hires trimmed.jpg
Landsat 7 image Brandberg Mountain, Namibia
Gavea Rock, a monolith next to the sea, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Gavea.jpg
Gavea Rock, a monolith next to the sea, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

A monolith is a geological feature consisting of a single massive stone or rock, such as some mountains, or a single large piece of rock placed as, or within, a monument or building.[ citation needed ] Erosion usually exposes the geological formations, which are often made of very hard and solid igneous or metamorphic rock.

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In architecture, the term has considerable overlap with megalith, which is normally used for prehistory, and may be used in the contexts of rock-cut architecture that remains attached to solid rock, as in monolithic church, or for exceptionally large stones such as obelisks, statues, monolithic columns or large architraves, that may have been moved a considerable distance after quarrying. It may also be used of large glacial erratics moved by natural forces.

The word derives, via the Latin monolithus, from the Ancient Greek word μονόλιθος (monolithos), from μόνος ("one" or "single") and λίθος ("stone").

Geological monoliths

Large, well-known monoliths include:

Africa

Antarctica

Asia


Savandurga, India, from the northern side Savandurga.jpg
Savandurga, India, from the northern side
Sangla Hill, Pakistan Sanglahill.JPG
Sangla Hill, Pakistan

Australia

Europe

Penyal d'Ifac, Spain Penon de Ifach-2009.jpg
Penyal d'Ifac, Spain

North America

United States

Beacon Rock, Washington, viewed from the west Beacon rock.jpg
Beacon Rock, Washington, viewed from the west
El Capitan in Yosemite El Capitan in 2010.jpg
El Capitan in Yosemite
Stawamus Chief as seen from Valleycliffe neighborhood in Squamish, British Columbia Stawamus sharp.jpg
Stawamus Chief as seen from Valleycliffe neighborhood in Squamish, British Columbia

Canada

Mexico

South America

El Penon, monolith in Colombia, located in Antioquia Elpenolantioquia.JPG
El Peñón, monolith in Colombia, located in Antioquia

Extraterrestrial

Monumental monoliths

A structure which has been excavated as a unit from a surrounding matrix or outcropping of rock. [5]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Kailasa temple, Ellora temple

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References

  1. López Domínguez, Leonor (May 2001). "Villa de Bernal and its Magic Mountain". México Desconocido #291. Archived from the original on 2015-03-13.
  2. "Peña de Bernal - Bernal - Queretaro" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 27 October 2006. Retrieved 25 November 2008.
  3. Raul Carrillo (2007). Northrop, Laura Cava; Dwight L. Curtis; Natalie Sherman (eds.). Let's Go Mexico: On a Budget. Macmillan. p. 370. ISBN   978-0-312-37452-5.
  4. Escobar Ledesma, Agustín (1999). Recetario del semidesierto de Querétaro: Acoyos, rejalgares y tantarrias. Conaculta. p. 75. ISBN   978-970-18-3910-2.
  5. "Glossary". Archived from the original on 2010-01-01.