Music of the Canary Islands

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The music of the Canary Islands reflects its cultural heritage. The islands used to be inhabited by the Guanches which are related to Berbers; they mixed with Spaniards, who live on the islands now. A variant of Jota is popular, as is Latin music, which has left its mark in the form of the timple guitar. There has been a strong connection with Cuban music, Venezuelan, Puerto Rican, and other Caribbean countries both through commerce and migration.

Canary Islands Archipelago in the Atlantic and autonomous community of Spain

The Canary Islands is a Spanish archipelago and the southernmost autonomous community of Spain located in the Atlantic Ocean, 100 kilometres west of Morocco at the closest point. The Canary Islands, which are also known informally as the Canaries, are among the outermost regions (OMR) of the European Union proper. It is also one of the eight regions with special consideration of historical nationality recognized as such by the Spanish Government. The Canary Islands belong to the African Plate like the Spanish cities of Ceuta and Melilla, the two on the African mainland.

Guanches aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands that are no longer exist as a distinct ethnicity

Guanches were the aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands. In 2017, the first genome-wide data from the Guanches confirmed a North African origin and that they were genetically most similar to modern North African Berber peoples of the nearby North African mainland. It is believed that they migrated to the archipelago around 1000 BCE or perhaps earlier.

Jota (music) music genre

The jota is a genre of music and the associated dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. It varies by region, having a characteristic form in Aragon, Catalonia, Castile, Navarre, Cantabria, Asturias, Galicia, La Rioja, Murcia and Eastern Andalusia. Being a visual representation, the jota is danced and sung accompanied by castanets, and the interpreters tend to wear regional costumes. In Valencia, the jota was once danced during interment ceremonies.

Popular dances from the Canary Islands include:

Tajaraste is combined music and dance typical of the Canary Islands, (Spain). It is specific to the islands of Tenerife and La Gomera. Essentially an upbeat, happy and syncopated rhythm, danced in pairs accompanied by tambourines, drums and small castanet-like instruments called chácaras.

Of these, the Isas, a local variation of Jota, are the best-known and most characteristic of the Canary Islands. They are graceful music, with a lot of variation among islands. In some places, a captain leads the dance and organizes others in a chain as the dance grows more and more complex.

Rondalla arrangements are very common. Instruments include charangas, timples (similar to a cavaquinho / ukulele), castanets, panderetas, lauds and guitars. A peculiar ensemble in El Hierro island is made of pito herreño players (a wooden transverse flute) and drums. Some ritual dances in Tenerife island are led by a tabor pipe player. Joyful music for carnival lies to a big extent on brass bands and Latin American patterns.

[[File:La vaga Costera.jpg|thumb|300px|Valencian folk ensemble 'La Rondalla de la Costera' performing live in Dénia]] The rondalla is an ensemble of stringed instruments played with the plectrum or pick and generally known as plectrum instruments. It originated in Medieval Spain, especially in Catalonia, Aragon, Murcia, and Valencia. The tradition was later taken to Spanish America and the Philippines. The word rondalla is from the Spanish ronda, meaning "serenade."

Timple traditional 5-string plucked string instrument of the Canary Islands

Not to be confused with the tiple.

Cavaquinho small plucked string instrument of the European guitar family

The cavaquinho is a small Portuguese string instrument in the European guitar family, with four wire or gut strings.

Canary musicians

Pedro Manuel Guerra Mansito is a Spanish singer-songwriter.

Rosana Arbelo Spanish singer-songwriter

Rosana Arbelo, is a Spanish singer and composer.

Valentina Hernández, also known as Valentina la de Sabinosa, was a Spanish singer of Canarian folk music. Thanks to her, music from the island of El Hierro got to be known in the rest of the Canary Islands, and even in the rest of Spain. Valentina was recognized in all of the Canary Islands because of her voice. She helped to popularize traditional songs from El Hierro such as El Baile del Vivo, El Tango Herreño, La Meda, El Conde de Cabras and, specially, El Arrorró Herreño.

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Music of Spain

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4
time
, the danzón is a slow, formal partner dance, requiring set footwork around syncopated beats, and incorporating elegant pauses while the couples stand listening to virtuoso instrumental passages, as characteristically played by a charanga or tipica ensemble.

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Chácaras type of castanets from the Canary Islands

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Colombian tiple

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