Ohio School for the Deaf

Last updated
Ohio School for the Deaf
Aerial view of Ohio School for the Deaf 01.jpg
Aerial view of the campus, 1988
Address
Ohio School for the Deaf
500 Morse Road

,
43214

United States
Coordinates 40°3′58″N83°0′17″W / 40.06611°N 83.00472°W / 40.06611; -83.00472 Coordinates: 40°3′58″N83°0′17″W / 40.06611°N 83.00472°W / 40.06611; -83.00472
Information
Type Public, Coeducational high school
EstablishedOctober 16, 1829;192 years ago (1829-10-16)
SuperintendentLou Maynus
DirectorJoshua Doudt
Grades Pre-K-12-(4 plus) after graduate
Color(s) Royal Blue and White   
Sloganthe ultimate in total education since 1829...
Athletics conference Eastern Schools for the Deaf Athletic Association
MascotSpartan
Team nameSpartans
Accreditation North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
Website osd.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/osd/

The Ohio School for the Deaf is a school located in Columbus, Ohio. It is run by the Ohio Department of Education for deaf and hard-of-hearing students across Ohio. It was established on October 16, 1829, making it the fifth oldest residential school in the country. [1] OSD is the only publicly funded residential school for the deaf in Ohio.

Contents

The mission of the Ohio School for the Deaf, an educational facility and resource center on deafness, is:

Before moving to the school's current location in Clintonville's Beechwold-Sharon Heights area, the school campus was in Downtown Columbus, and was known as the Ohio Institution for the Deaf and Dumb. The school's main building there was demolished in 1981, though another still stands, now used as Cristo Rey Columbus High School.

Part of the previous location of the school, now Cristo Rey Columbus High School Cristo Rey-crop.jpg
Part of the previous location of the school, now Cristo Rey Columbus High School

See also

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References

  1. Gannon, Jack R.; Butler, Jane; Gilbert, Laura-Jean (2012) [1981]. Deaf heritage : a narrative history of deaf America. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press. ISBN   9781563685156. OCLC   905748274.[ page needed ]
  2. "Ohio School for the Deaf - Vision & Mission". ohioschoolforthedeaf.org. 2015-10-02. Archived from the original on 2015-10-02. Retrieved 2018-10-19.