Stonewall, Oklahoma

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Stonewall, Oklahoma
OKMap-doton-Stonewall.PNG
Location of Stonewall, Oklahoma
Coordinates: 34°39′4″N96°31′36″W / 34.65111°N 96.52667°W / 34.65111; -96.52667 Coordinates: 34°39′4″N96°31′36″W / 34.65111°N 96.52667°W / 34.65111; -96.52667
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Pontotoc
Area
  Total0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)
  Land0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)
  Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
702 ft (214 m)
Population
  Total465
  Density1,435.7/sq mi (554.3/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
74871
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-70500 [1]
GNIS feature ID1098561 [2]

Stonewall is a town in Pontotoc County, Oklahoma, United States. Named for Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, the settlement's post office was established in December, 1874. [3]

Pontotoc County, Oklahoma County in the United States

Pontotoc County is in the south central part of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,492. Its county seat is Ada. The county was created at statehood from part of the Chickasaw Nation in Indian Territory. It was named for a historic Chickasaw tribal area in Mississippi. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Pontotoc is usually translated "cattail prairie" or "land of hanging grapes."

Oklahoma State of the United States of America

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

Stonewall Jackson Confederate general

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson served as a Confederate general (1861–1863) during the American Civil War, and became one of the best-known Confederate commanders after General Robert E. Lee. Jackson played a prominent role in nearly all military engagements in the Eastern Theater of the war until his death, and played a key role in winning many significant battles.

Contents

History

Before Stonewall was a town, it was primarily the Chickasaw tribes land. [4] Robert L. Cochran was a Georgia man who settled Stonewall first by opening up a trading post on the original site of Stonewall. The site was declared Pontotoc, which would become the county name in the present. Along with the settling of Cochran's store a post office opened there in 1858. [4] The settlement was then named Stonewall in honor of confederate war general Stonewall Jackson. [4] By the late 1800s, Stonewall had increased in population and had multiple businesses open such as a cotton gin, good stores, a hotel, and stagecoach station. [4]

Chickasaw indigenous people of Southeastern Woodlands of the US

The Chickasaw are an indigenous people of the Southeastern Woodlands. Their traditional territory was in the Southeastern United States of Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee. They are of the Muskogean language family and are federally recognized as the Chickasaw Nation.

In the early 1900s Stonewall was on the rise with the expansion of the railroad from Oklahoma City that passed through Ada. [4] A debate was in place about whether they wanted to move the town closer to the railroad, but many didn't want to leave due to Stonewall being a "historically significant as the seat of Pontotoc County in the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory". [4] Eventually some moved and the original site would be renamed to Frisco. The new Stonewall site was now official and with the recent move of businesses and post office, the population was thriving. [4]

Oklahoma City State capital city in Oklahoma, United States

Oklahoma City, often shortened to OKC, is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The county seat of Oklahoma County, the city ranks 27th among United States cities in population. The population grew following the 2010 Census, with the population estimated to have increased to 643,648 as of July 2017. As of 2015, the Oklahoma City metropolitan area had a population of 1,358,452, and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,459,758 residents, making it Oklahoma's largest metropolitan area.

In 1930, Stonewall was unaffected by the Great Depression due to oil booms within the town. [4] However, with the oil boom brought environmental destruction. The local creek was flooded with waste and polluted, causing locals to take action by digging wells. [4] In 1932 Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd and his accomplice George Birdwell robbed the Stonewall Bank. They escaped with $600 and had assaulted two bank officers. [5] While on the run Floyd and Birdwell kidnapped a man on a motorcycle as they fled away from the town. [5]

Pretty Boy Floyd American bank robber

Charles Arthur Floyd nicknamed Pretty Boy Floyd, was an American bank robber. He operated in the West and West South Central States, and his criminal exploits gained widespread press coverage in the 1930s. Like several other prominent outlaws of that era, he was pursued and killed by a group of Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents led by Melvin Purvis. Historians have speculated as to which officers were at the event, local or FBI: known accounts document that local officers Robert "Pete" Pyle and George Curran were present at his fatal shooting and also at his embalming. Floyd has continued to be a familiar figure in American popular culture, sometimes seen as notorious, but at other times viewed as a tragic figure, partly a victim of the hard times of the Great Depression in the United States.

George William Birdwell was an American bank robber and Depression-era outlaw. He was one of Pretty Boy Floyd's closest known associates and also teamed with a number of fellow Oklahoma-based bandits, most notably, William "Billy the Killer" Miller and Aussie Elliott.

Today Stonewall is a smaller town after the reroute of Highway 3 away from the town, causing business to slow down and steady. There are a few businesses within in the town; however, many people are employed in Ada. [4]

Geography

Stonewall is located at 34°39′4″N96°31′36″W / 34.65111°N 96.52667°W / 34.65111; -96.52667 (34.651099, -96.526655). [6] According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2), all of it land.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 494
1920 62225.9%
1930 478−23.2%
1940 76159.2%
1950 634−16.7%
1960 584−7.9%
1970 65311.8%
1980 6722.9%
1990 519−22.8%
2000 465−10.4%
2010 4701.1%
Est. 2015474 [7] 0.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

As of the census of 2010, there were 470 people, 186 households, and 106 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,435.7 people per square mile (561.1/km²). There were 238 housing units at an average density of 734.8 per square mile (287.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 70.6% White, 2.6% African American, 14.7% Native American, 0.2% from other races, and 11.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3% of the population.

Of the 195 households, 19.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.8% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43% were non-families. 37.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 33.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 3.06. [9]

In the town, the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 20.5% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.6 males. [9]

The median income for a household in the town was $19,135, and the median income for a family was $22,813. Males had a median income of $20,500 compared to $14,792 for females. The per capita income for the town was $9,741. About 23.5% of families and 25.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.8% of those under age 18 and 29.3% of those age 65 or over.

High School Baseball

Stonewall High School Longhorn athletics has two High School Boys Baseball State Championships. One in the Spring of 1979 and the second in the Fall of 2000.

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Roff, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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References

  1. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. "Stonewall". Oklahoma Historical Society.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "Stonewall". Oklahoma Historical Society.
  5. 1 2 "Stonewall bank robbed by Pretty Boy Floyd and George Birdwell". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-04-04.
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on July 14, 2016. Retrieved July 2, 2016.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  9. 1 2 "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.