Thraco-Roman

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The term Thraco-Roman describes the Romanized culture of Thracians under the rule of the Roman Empire.

Contents

The Odrysian kingdom of Thrace became a Roman client kingdom c. 20 BC, while the Greek city-states on the Black Sea coast came under Roman control, first as civitates foederatae ("allied" cities with internal autonomy). After the death of the Thracian king Rhoemetalces III in 46 AD and an unsuccessful anti-Roman revolt, the kingdom was annexed as the Roman province of Thracia. [1]

Archaeological sites

Famous individuals

This is a list of several important Thraco-Roman individuals:

See also

Further reading

Notes

  1. Soustal (1991), pp. 59–60
  2. Dimitŭr Nikolov, "The Thraco-Roman Villa Rustica near Chatalka, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria", British Archaeological Reports, 1976
  3. Second Meeting of the Expert Working Group: The 50 Most Attractive Tourist Sites in the Cross Border Region of Dobrudzha, http://www.dobrudzhatour.net/resources/72/doc_1333365852.pdf
  4. 1 2 Patrick Amory, People and Identity in Ostrogothic Italy, 489–554, Cambridge University Press, 2003.
  5. Russu, Ion I. (1976). Elementele traco-getice în Imperiul Roman și în Byzantium (in Romanian). veacurile III-VII. Editura Academiei R. S. România. p. 95.
  6. Iv Velkov, Velizar (1977). Cities in Thrace and Dacia in Late Antiquity: (studies and Materials). University of Michigan. p. 47.
  7. Browning, Robert (2003). Justinian and Theodora. Gorgias Press LLC. p. 23. ISBN   1-59333-053-7.
  8. Johnson, Scott Fitzgerald (2006). Greek Literature in Late Antiquity. Ashgate Publishing. p. 166. ISBN   0-7546-5683-7.
  9. Norwich, John Julius (1997). A Short History of Byzantium . Vintage Books. p.  59. ISBN   0-679-77269-3.
  10. The precise location of this site is disputed; the possible locations include Justiniana Prima near the modern town of Lebane in southern Serbia and Taor near Skopje, North Macedonia.
  11. Cawley, Charles (14 February 2011), Byzantium 395–1057, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved 20 February 2012, [ self-published source ][ better source needed ]
  12. Justinian referred to Latin as being his native tongue in several of his laws. See Moorhead (1994), p. 18.
  13. The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Justinian by Michael Maas
  14. Justinian and Theodora Robert Browning, Gorgias Press LLC, 2003, ISBN   1-59333-053-7, p. 23.
  15. Tucker, Spencer C. (2010). Battles that changed history : an encyclopedia of world conflict (1st ed.). Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO. p. 88. ISBN   978-1-59884-429-0.

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