Threapwood

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Threapwood
Threapwood Windmill.jpg
Derelict brick tower mill at Threapwood
Cheshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Threapwood
Location within Cheshire
Population153 (2011)
OS grid reference SJ440451
Civil parish
  • Threapwood
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town MALPAS
Postcode district SY14
Dialling code 01948
Police Cheshire
Fire Cheshire
Ambulance North West
EU Parliament North West England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Cheshire
53°00′18″N2°49′59″W / 53.005°N 2.833°W / 53.005; -2.833 Coordinates: 53°00′18″N2°49′59″W / 53.005°N 2.833°W / 53.005; -2.833

Threapwood is a small village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It is close to the villages of Shocklach, Worthenbury and Malpas.

Cheshire West and Chester Borough and Unitary authority in England

Cheshire West and Chester is a unitary authority with borough status in the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It was established on 1 April 2009 as part of the 2009 local government changes, by virtue of an order under the Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007. It superseded the boroughs of Ellesmere Port and Neston and Vale Royal and the City of Chester; its council assumed the functions and responsibilities of the former Cheshire County Council within its area. The remainder of ceremonial Cheshire is composed of Cheshire East, Halton and Warrington.

Shocklach village in United Kingdom

Shocklach is a village in the civil parish of Shocklach Oviatt and District, in the Cheshire West and Chester district, in the county of Cheshire, England. Shocklach village is in the southwestern corner of Cheshire, approximately 1 kilometre (0.6 mi) from the border between Wales and England, the River Dee. The village lies between Wrexham, 10 kilometres (6 mi) to the west, and Nantwich, 21 kilometres (13 mi) to the east.

Malpas, Cheshire village and civil parish in Cheshire West and Chester, Cheshire, England

Malpas is a large village that used to be a market town. It is also a civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The parish lies on the border with Shropshire and Wales. The name is from Old French and means "bad/poor" (mal) and "passage/way" (pas).

Contents

Etymology, history

Threapwood developed on an area of common land, historically a tract of woodland lying between Cheshire and Flintshire, which was traditionally reputed to have fallen outside of county, parish and township boundaries: it was therefore outside the jurisdiction of any Justice of the Peace and paid no land tax or parish rates. This status was reflected in its name, with threap being a common Old English place name element referring to disputed boundary areas. [1]

Common land land owned collectively

Common land is land owned collectively by a number of persons, or by one person, but over which other people have certain traditional rights, such as to allow their livestock to graze upon it, to collect wood, or to cut turf for fuel.

Flintshire (historic) historic county

Flintshire, also known as the County of Flint, is one of Wales' thirteen historic counties, and a former administrative county. It mostly lies on the north-east coast of Wales.

Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French. This is regarded as marking the end of the Old English era, as during this period the English language was heavily influenced by Anglo-Norman, developing into a phase known now as Middle English.

This vague administrative status was to lead to Threapwood gaining a reputation as a home to "abandoned characters of every description, and especially of women of loose or blemished morals". [2] It was also a refuge for military deserters. [3] Various attempts were made to bring Threapwood within the normal administrative structure; by the Militia Acts of 1792 it was decreed to be in Worthenbury - though for the purposes of the militia only - and the Mutiny Act 1797 placed it in the parish of Malpas. [4]

The Militia Acts of 1792 were a pair of statutes enacted by the second United States Congress in 1792. The acts provided for the organization of the state militias and provided for the President of the United States to take command of the state militias in times of imminent invasion or insurrection. This authority was used to suppress the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Until Victorian times the village continued to be regarded as partly in Cheshire, and partly in Flintshire. But in 1896, under the "County of Chester (Threapwood) Order", the county boundary (and therefore the boundary between England and Wales), which passed through the village, was adjusted slightly in favour of Cheshire.

Buildings

St John's Church St. john, threapwood II.jpg
St John's Church

Churches

St Johns Church, Threapwood Church in Cheshire, England

St John's Church is in the village of Threapwood, Cheshire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Chester, and the deanery of Malpas. Its benefice is combined with those of St Oswald, Malpas and Holy Trinity, Bickerton. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building. The authors of the Buildings of England series state that it is entirely Georgian in style.

Other

Windmill machine that converts the energy of wind into rotational energy

A windmill is a structure that converts the energy of wind into rotational energy by means of vanes called sails or blades. Centuries ago, windmills usually were used to mill grain (gristmills), pump water (windpumps), or both. There are windmills that convert the rotational energy directly into heat. The majority of modern windmills take the form of wind turbines used to generate electricity, or windpumps used to pump water, either for land drainage or to extract groundwater. Windmills first appeared in Persia during the 9th century, and then later appeared across the Middle East, Central Asia, China, India, and Europe.

See also

Sources

  1. Winchester, W. Discovering Parish Boundaries, Shire, 2000, p.42
  2. GENUKI : Flintshire, Threapwood, St. John
  3. See Pickering, D. Statutes at Large from the 26th to the 30th year of King George III, Cambridge: Charles Bathurst, 1766, p.329
  4. Cathrall, W. The History of North Wales: Comprising a Topographical Description of the Several Counties of Anglesey, Caernarvon, Denbigh, Flint, Merioneth, and Montgomery, v2, 1828, p.233
  5. Pevsner, Nikolaus and Hubbard, Edward (1971). The Buildings of England: Cheshire. Penguin Books. ISBN   0-300-09588-0

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Threapwood at Wikimedia Commons

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