Tyndall Glacier (Colorado)

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Tyndall Glacier
Hallett Peak & Tyndall Glacier.jpg
Hallett Peak and Tyndall Glacier
USA Colorado location map.svg
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Tyndall Glacier
Location in Colorado
TypeCirque glacier
Location Larimer County, Colorado, United States
Coordinates 40°18′17″N105°41′22″W / 40.30472°N 105.68944°W / 40.30472; -105.68944 Coordinates: 40°18′17″N105°41′22″W / 40.30472°N 105.68944°W / 40.30472; -105.68944 [1]
TerminusTalus
StatusRetreating

Tyndall Glacier is a small cirque glacier in Rocky Mountain National Park in the U.S. state of Colorado. [2] Tyndall Glacier is on the east side of the Continental Divide and in a cirque to the north of Hallett Peak. Tyndall Glacier is both an ice and a rock glacier, with the lower portions of the glacier being composed primarily of rock debris and a small portion of ice. [3]

Tyndall Glacier is named after John Tyndall, an Irish scientist and Alpine mountaineer who in 1861 first ascended the Weisshorn and made an early attempt on the Matterhorn prior to its first ascent. In 1861 Tyndall identified carbon dioxide as a heat-trapping greenhouse gas; the glacier that bears his name appears to be retreating.

See also

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References

  1. "Tyndall Glacier". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved August 19, 2012.
  2. McHenrys Peak, CO (Map). TopoQwest (United States Geological Survey Maps). Retrieved August 19, 2012.
  3. "Glacier Basics". Glaciers and Glacier Change of Rocky Mountain National Park. National Park Service. Retrieved August 19, 2012.