List of glaciers in the United States

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Exit Glacier, Alaska 1055 - exit glacier.jpg
Exit Glacier, Alaska

This is a list of glaciers existing in the United States, currently or in recent centuries. These glaciers are located in nine states, all in the Rocky Mountains or farther west. The southernmost named glacier among them is the Lilliput Glacier in Tulare County, east of the Central Valley of California.

Contents

Glaciers of Alaska

The Homer Spit is believed to be the remains of a glacial moraine. Homer Alaska Spit Panorama.jpg
The Homer Spit is believed to be the remains of a glacial moraine.

There are approximately 664 named glaciers in Alaska according to the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). [1]

Gulkana glacier in the Alaska Range Gulkanaglacier.JPG
Gulkana glacier in the Alaska Range
Johns Hopkins Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve A045, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, USA, Johns Hopkins Glacier, 2002.jpg
Johns Hopkins Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve
Matanuska Glacier and peaks of the Chugach Mountains Matanuska Glacier 8859s.JPG
Matanuska Glacier and peaks of the Chugach Mountains
Mendenhall Glacier and the Coast Mountains, Juneau, Alaska A041, Juneau, Alaska, USA, Mendenhall Glacier, 2002.jpg
Mendenhall Glacier and the Coast Mountains, Juneau, Alaska
Ocean liner and Taku Glacier in art for Canadian Pacific Ocean liner and glacier in art detail, Alaska via Canadian Pacific. Taku Glacier (3531517944) (cropped).jpg
Ocean liner and Taku Glacier in art for Canadian Pacific

Glaciers of the Pacific Coast Ranges

The Pacific Coast Ranges include glaciers in the three states on the Pacific Coast.

Washington

Boulder Glacier, Mount Baker Boulder Glacier 3593.JPG
Boulder Glacier, Mount Baker

There are approximately 186 named glaciers in Washington according to the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). [2] However, the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens eliminated nine of its eleven named glaciers and only the new glacier known as Crater Glacier has been reestablished since.

Olympic Mountains
Mount Olympus
Other peaks in the Olympic Mountains
North Cascades (non-volcanoes)
Company Glacier Bonanza Peak Washington.jpg
Company Glacier
Mount Baker
Glacier Peak
Mount Rainier
Sarvent Glacier, Cowlitz Chimneys. Sarvent Glacier 23012.JPG
Sarvent Glacier, Cowlitz Chimneys.
Goat Rocks
Mount Adams
Mount St. Helens

Mount St. Helens once had eleven named glaciers, but the 1980 eruption of the volcano eliminated nine glaciers and the two remaining aren't recognized. One newly formed glacier now resides in the caldera of the volcano.

Oregon

There are 35 named glaciers in Oregon according to the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). [3]

Wallowa Mountains
Mount Hood [4]
Mount Jefferson
Three Sisters Region
Other Cascade Peaks

California

There are 20 named glaciers in California according to the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). [5]

Mount Shasta

Mount Shasta is a volcano with seven named glaciers in the northern region of California.

Sierra Nevada

Glaciers of Nevada (in the Basin and Range Province)

Wheeler Peak Glacier in Nevada 2014-09-15 12 59 34 View of the Wheeler Peak Glacier in Great Basin National Park, Nevada.JPG
Wheeler Peak Glacier in Nevada

Basin and Range Province lies east of the Coast Ranges and west of the Rockies. There are no active glaciers in the Basin and Range Province and Wheeler Peak Glacier is considered by some to be a rock glacier.

Glaciers of the Rocky Mountains

Colorado

Andrews Glacier in Colorado Andrews Glacier.jpg
Andrews Glacier in Colorado

According to the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), there are sixteen named glaciers in Colorado. [6] According to early mountain explorers and scientists, Colorado once had over eighteen glaciers before 1880.

See also Glaciers of Colorado See also

Montana

Grinnell Glacier with proglacial lake and The Salamander Glacier on high ledge Grinnell Glacier 2009.jpg
Grinnell Glacier with proglacial lake and The Salamander Glacier on high ledge

According to the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), there are 60 named glaciers in Montana. [7]

Utah

There are no visible glaciers in Utah. Timpanogos Glacier article is documentation of a buried glacier.

Wyoming

Gannett Glacier is the largest glacier in the American Rockies and is located in the remote Wind River Range, Wyoming. Gannet Peak with Gannett Glacier.jpg
Gannett Glacier is the largest glacier in the American Rockies and is located in the remote Wind River Range, Wyoming.

According to the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), there are 37 named glaciers in Wyoming. [8]

Hikers head towards Schoolroom Glacier at right while the terminal moraine and proglacial lake can be seen at left Schoolroom Glacier from Hurricane Pass.jpg
Hikers head towards Schoolroom Glacier at right while the terminal moraine and proglacial lake can be seen at left

See also

Related Research Articles

Kenai Peninsula Large peninsula in south central Alaska, United States

The Kenai Peninsula is a large peninsula jutting from the coast of Southcentral Alaska. The name Kenai is derived from the word "Kenaitze" or "Kenaitze Indian Tribe", the name of the Native Athabascan Alaskan tribe, the Kahtnuht’ana Dena’ina, who historically inhabited the area. They called the Kenai Peninsula Yaghanen.

Mount Shuksan Mountain in Washington state, United States

Mount Shuksan is a glaciated massif in the North Cascades National Park. Shuksan rises in Whatcom County, Washington immediately to the east of Mount Baker, and 11.6 miles (18.7 km) south of the Canada–US border. The mountain's name Shuksan is derived from the Lummi word [šéqsən], said to mean "high peak". The highest point on the mountain is a three sided peak known as Summit Pyramid.

Nooksack River River in Washington state, United States

The Nooksack River is a river in western Whatcom County of the northwestern U.S. state of Washington, draining an area of the Cascade Range around Mount Baker near the Canada–US border.

Kenai Fjords National Park National park in Alaska, United States

Kenai Fjords National Park is an American national park that maintains the Harding Icefield, its outflowing glaciers, and coastal fjords and islands. The park covers an area of 669,984 acres on the Kenai Peninsula in south-central Alaska, west of the town of Seward.

Kenai Mountains Mountain range in Alaska, United States

The Kenai Mountains are a mountain range in the U.S. state of Alaska. They extend 192 km (120 mi) northeast from the southern end of the Kenai Peninsula to the Chugach Mountains, and have an average elevation of 3,000 to 5,000 feet.

Mount Crillon

Mount Crillon is a high peak of the Fairweather Range, the southernmost part of the Saint Elias Mountains. It lies southeast of Mount Fairweather, in the promontory between the Gulf of Alaska and Glacier Bay. It is included in Glacier Bay National Park. The peak was named after Felix-Francois-Dorothee de Bretton, Comte de Crillon, by his friend, the French explorer Jean Francois de Galaup de la Perouse.

Harding Icefield Ice field in the Alaska, United States

The Harding Icefield is an expansive icefield located in the Kenai Mountains of the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. It is also partially located in Kenai Fjords National Park. It is named for United States President Warren G. Harding.

Exit Glacier

Exit Glacier is a glacier derived from the Harding Icefield in the Kenai Mountains of Alaska and one of Kenai Fjords National Park's major attractions. It is one of the most accessible valley glaciers in Alaska and is a visible indicator of glacial recession due to climate change. Exit Glacier retreated approximately 187 feet (57 m) from 2013 to 2014 and park scientists continue to monitor and record the glacier's accelerating recession.

Geography of the North Cascades

The geography of the North Cascades describes a range of rugged mountains in British Columbia, Canada and Washington, United States. In Canada, the range is officially named the Cascade Mountains but is commonly referred to as the Canadian Cascades.

Kichatna Spire

Kichatna Spire, sometimes called the Kichatna Spires, is a 7,684-foot (2,342 m) spire-shaped peak in the Kichatna Mountains of the Alaska Range, in Denali National Park and Preserve, southwest of Denali. Cul-de-sac, Shelf and Shadows Glaciers originate at Kichatna Spire.

McGinnis Mountain

McGinnis Mountain, also known as Mount McGinnis, is a 4,232-foot (1,290 m) mountain summit located in the Boundary Ranges, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The peak is situated near the toe of the Mendenhall Glacier, within Tongass National Forest, 11 mi (18 km) north-northwest of Juneau, Alaska, and 6 mi (10 km) north of Juneau International Airport. Although modest in elevation, relief is significant since the mountain rises up from sea level at Auke Bay in less than five miles. McGinnis Mountain is often seen and photographed with Stroller White Mountain, a 5,118-foot (1,560 m) summit 1.6 mi (3 km) to the north because they are together in the background behind Mendenhall Lake, a popular tourist and recreation area.

Pyramid Peak (Pierce County, Washington)

Pyramid Peak is a 6,937-foot (2,114-metre) mountain summit located in Mount Rainier National Park in Pierce County of Washington state. It is part of the Cascade Range and overlooks Indian Henry's Hunting Ground. It is situated at the base of the Success Cleaver, south of South Tahoma Glacier, and southwest of Pyramid Glacier. The summit provides views of Mount Rainier, Mount Adams, Mount St. Helens, and peaks of the Tatoosh Range. Precipitation runoff from Pyramid Peak drains into Pyramid Creek, Tahoma Creek, and Fishers Horn Pipe Creek, which are all tributaries of the Nisqually River.

Mount Tom White

Mount Tom White is a prominent 11,191-foot glaciated mountain summit located in the Chugach Mountains, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The remote peak is situated on land managed by Chugach National Forest, 72 mi (116 km) northeast of Cordova, and 20 mi (32 km) north of the Bering Glacier, North America's largest glacier. The mountain lies within the Copper River drainage basin, and is the eighth-highest major peak in the Chugach Mountains. Topographic relief is significant as it ranks 17th in prominence for all peaks in Alaska, and 52nd for all North America peaks. The first ascent of the mountain was made in 1973 by Story Clark, Chris Hall, Tom Kizzia, William Resor, Sarah Robey, and Don White.

Mount Ascension

Mount Ascension is a prominent 5,710-foot (1,740 m) mountain summit located in the Kenai Mountains, on the Kenai Peninsula, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The mountain is situated in Chugach National Forest, 6.8 mi (11 km) south of Mount Adair, 3.5 mi (6 km) north of Resurrection Peaks, and 10 mi (16 km) north of Seward, Alaska. The peak is near the mouth of Resurrection River into Resurrection Bay. The name Resurrection, referring to the Resurrection of Jesus, is overused for nearby landforms on the Kenai peninsula, as the mountain to the immediate south is Resurrection Peaks. This Ascension name is a variation of the theme. Mount Ascension's name was proposed in 1968 by the Mountaineering Club of Alaska, and officially adopted in 1969 by the United States Geological Survey. Access to the peak is via the Lost Lake Trail, and mountaineering skills are needed to reach the summit. In clear weather the immense Harding Icefield can be seen from the top. The first ascent of this peak was made October 6, 1968, by John Vincent Hoeman and his wife, Dr. Grace (Jansen) Hoeman.

Phoenix Peak (Alaska)

Phoenix Peak is a 5,187-foot (1,581 m) mountain summit located in the Kenai Mountains, on the Kenai Peninsula, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The peak is situated in Kenai Fjords National Park, 2 mi (3 km) southwest of Mount Benson, 1.1 mi (2 km) northwest of Marathon Mountain, and 3.5 mi (6 km) west of Seward, Alaska. The first ascent of the peak was made July 23, 1964, by Don Stockard of the Mountaineering Club of Alaska. The peak was named in 1965 by the Mountaineering Club of Alaska for the first ship ever built in Russian America, the Phoenix, which was constructed in 1794 by Russians in nearby Resurrection Bay. The mountain's name was officially adopted in 1966 by the United States Geological Survey.

Bear Mountain (Seward, Alaska)

Bear Mountain is a 4,019-foot (1,225 m) mountain summit located in the Kenai Mountains, on the Kenai Peninsula, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The peak is situated in Chugach National Forest, 5 mi (8 km) northeast of Bear Glacier, 2.1 mi (3 km) south-southeast of Marathon Mountain, and 5 mi (8 km) southwest of Seward, Alaska. The peak's local name was reported in 1951 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The months May and June offer the most favorable weather for viewing the mountain. In fair weather, the Harding Icefield can be seen from the summit.

Lowell Peak

Lowell Peak is a 4,416-foot (1,346 m) mountain summit located in the Kenai Mountains, on the Kenai Peninsula, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The peak is situated in Chugach National Forest, 1.2 mi (2 km) northwest of Bear Mountain, 1.5 mi (2 km) south-southwest of Marathon Mountain, 2.2 mi (4 km) south of Phoenix Peak, and 3 mi (5 km) west-southwest of Seward, Alaska. The months May and June offer the most favorable weather for viewing the mountain. In fair weather, the Harding Icefield can be seen from the summit, as well as Mount Alice on the opposite side of Resurrection Bay. This unofficially named peak takes its name from Franklin G. Lowell and his family who were the first homesteaders to settle the Seward area in 1883.

Pacific Coastal Mountain icefields and tundra

Pacific Coastal Mountain icefields and tundra is a tundra ecoregion in Alaska, British Columbia, and Yukon, as defined by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) categorization system.

Truuli Peak

Truuli Peak is a mountain summit located in the Kenai Mountains, in the U.S. state of Alaska. At 6,612 ft, Truuli Peak is the highest mountain in the Kenai Mountains on the Kenai Peninsula in southern Alaska. It is located in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in the southwest of the Harding Icefield between the Chernof and Truuli glaciers.

References

  1. "Alaska State Glaciers Feature Query Results". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  2. "Washington State Glaciers Feature Query Results". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  3. "Oregon State Glaciers Feature Query Results". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  4. "Glaciers at Mount Hood, Oregon". Volcano Hazards Program. United States Geological Survey. September 28, 2012. Retrieved October 14, 2012.
  5. "California State Glaciers Feature Query Results". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  6. "Colorado State Glaciers Feature Query Results". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  7. "Montana State Glaciers Feature Query Results". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  8. "Wyoming State Glaciers Feature Query Results". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2012.