Fall River Entrance Historic District

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Fall River Entrance Historic District
Fall River Visitor Center.jpg
Fall River Visitor Center
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Nearest city Estes Park, Colorado
Coordinates 40°24′11.232″N105°35′13.452″W / 40.40312000°N 105.58707000°W / 40.40312000; -105.58707000 Coordinates: 40°24′11.232″N105°35′13.452″W / 40.40312000°N 105.58707000°W / 40.40312000; -105.58707000
Built1936
ArchitectE.A. Nickel, NPS Branch of Plans and Design
MPS Rocky Mountain National Park MRA
NRHP reference No. 87001139  (original)
100002148  (increase)
Significant dates
Added to NRHPJanuary 29, 1988 [1]
Boundary increaseMarch 5, 2018

The Fall River Entrance Historic District in Rocky Mountain National Park preserves an area of park administration buildings and employee residences built in the National Park Service Rustic style. The area is close to Estes Park, Colorado, at the original primary entrance to the east side of the park. The area includes the Bighorn Ranger Station, several houses, and some utility buildings. The buildings were designed in the 1920s and 1930s by the National Park Service Branch of Plans and Designs. Many of the 1930s buildings were built by Civilian Conservation Corps labor. [2]

Contents

The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988, and enlarged in 2018. [1]

See also

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. "Fall River Entrance Historic District". List of Classified Structures. National Park Service. 2009-01-11. Archived from the original on 2011-05-21. Retrieved 2009-01-12.