Timber Creek Campground Comfort Stations

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Timber Creek Campground Comfort Stations No. 245, 246 and 247
Timber Creek Campground Comfort Station No. 247.jpg
Comfort Station 247
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Nearest city Estes Park, Colorado
Coordinates 40°22′50″N105°51′5″W / 40.38056°N 105.85139°W / 40.38056; -105.85139 Coordinates: 40°22′50″N105°51′5″W / 40.38056°N 105.85139°W / 40.38056; -105.85139
Built1939
MPS Rocky Mountain National Park MRA
NRHP reference No. 87001131, 87001132, 87001133
Added to NRHPJanuary 29, 1988 [1]

The Timber Creek Campground Comfort Stations are a set of three historic public toilet facilities in Rocky Mountain National Park. Designed in 1935 by landscape architect Howard W. Baker of the National Park Service Branch of Plans and Designs, the National Park Service Rustic buildings were built with Civilian Conservation Corps labor in 1939. [2] They were added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 29, 1988. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. "Timber Creek Comfort Station". List of Classified Structures. National Park Service. 2009-01-12.