Flattop Mountain Trail

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Flattop Mountain Trail
Flattop Mountain Trail in winter.jpg
Along the trail at nearly 11,000 feet
USA Colorado location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Nearest city Estes Park, Colorado
Built1925
ArchitectNational Park Service; Civilian Conservation Corps
MPS Rocky Mountain National Park MPS
NRHP reference No. 07000999
Added to NRHPSeptember 27, 2007 [1]

The Flattop Mountain Trail, also known as the Grand Trail or the Big Trail, was built in 1925 in Rocky Mountain National Park in the Larimer County portion of the U.S. state of Colorado. Built in 1925, and rehabilitated in 1940 with Civilian Conservation Corps labor, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The trail begins at 9500 feet of elevation at Bear Lake and climbs Flattop Mountain to a maximum elevation of 12,324 feet on the Continental Divide. [2]

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Larimer County, Colorado

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References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. "Flattop Mountain Trail". List of Classified Structures. National Park Service. 2008-12-15.