Glacier Basin Campground Ranger Station

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Glacier Basin Campground Ranger Station
Glacier Basin Campground Ranger Station.jpg
Front of the station
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Nearest city Estes Park, Colorado
Coordinates 40°19′48″N105°35′40″W / 40.33000°N 105.59444°W / 40.33000; -105.59444 Coordinates: 40°19′48″N105°35′40″W / 40.33000°N 105.59444°W / 40.33000; -105.59444
Built1930
ArchitectNPS Branch of Plans and Designs
MPS Rocky Mountain National Park MRA
NRHP reference No. 87001143 [1]
Added to NRHPJuly 20, 1987

The Glacier Basin Campground Ranger Station in Rocky Mountain National Park was built in 1930 to a design by the National Park Service Branch of Plans and Designs. The National Park Service Rustic log and stone structure was designed to blend with the landscape, and continues to function as a ranger station. [2]

See also

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References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. "Glacier Basin Campground Ranger Station". List of Classified Structures. National Park Service. 2009-01-08.