Fern Lake Patrol Cabin

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Fern Lake Patrol Cabin
Fern Lake Patrol Cabin.jpg
Front of the cabin
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Nearest city Estes Park, Colorado
Coordinates 40°20′17″N105°40′34″W / 40.33806°N 105.67611°W / 40.33806; -105.67611 Coordinates: 40°20′17″N105°40′34″W / 40.33806°N 105.67611°W / 40.33806; -105.67611
Built1925
ArchitectDaniel Ray Hull, NPS Landscape Engineering Division
MPS Rocky Mountain National Park MRA
NRHP reference No. 87001142
Added to NRHPJanuary 29, 1988 [1]

The Fern Lake Patrol Cabin in Rocky Mountain National Park was designed by National Park Service landscape Daniel Ray Hull and built in 1925. The National Park Service Rustic cabin was used for a time as a ranger station. [2] . It was destroyed by the East Troublesome Fire in 2020 [3] .

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Larimer County, Colorado

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References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. "Fern Lake Patrol Cabin". List of Classified Structures. National Park Service. 2009-01-09.
  3. "Rocky Mountain National Park loses several historic structures in East Troublesome fire". The Know. Denver Post. 2020-11-06.