USS LST-167

Last updated

History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name: USS LST-167
Builder:
Laid down: 19 September 1942
Launched: 25 February 1943
Commissioned: 27 April 1943
Struck: 6 December 1943
Honours and
awards:
Fate: Destroyed in Action, 25 September 1943
General characteristics
Class and type: Landing Ship, Tank
Displacement:
  • 1625 tons light
  • 4080 tons full
  • (full load = 2100 tons)
Length: 327 ft 9 in (99.90 m)
Beam: 50 ft (15 m)
Draft:
  • Unloaded:
  • Bow: 1 ft 6 in (0.46 m)
  • Stern: 7 ft 5 in (2.26 m)
  • Loaded :
  • Bow: 8 ft 2 in (2.49 m)
  • Stern: 14 ft 1 in (4.29 m)
Propulsion:
Speed: 11.6 knots (21.5 km/h; 13.3 mph)
Range: 24000 nm @ 9 knots
Troops: 163
Complement: 111
Armament:

USS LST-167 was a ship of the class Landing Ship, Tank in the service of the United States Coast Guard during World War II. The ship was built in Evansville, Indiana by the Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Company and was commissioned 27 April 1943. She was placed under the command of LT Edward C. Simons, USCG.

Landing Ship, Tank military designation for naval vessels

Landing Ship, Tank (LST), or tank landing ship, is the naval designation for ships first developed during World War II (1939-1945)to support amphibious operations by carrying tanks, vehicles, cargo, and landing troops directly onto shore with no docks or piers. This enabled amphibious assaults on almost any beach. The bow of the LST had a large door that would open with a ramp for unloading the vehicles. The LST had a special flat keel that allowed the ship to be beached and stay upright. The twin propellers and rudders had protection from grounding. The LSTs served across the globe during World War II including in the Pacific War and in the European theatre.

United States Coast Guard Coastal defense and law enforcement branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is the coastal defense and maritime law enforcement branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the country's seven uniformed services. The Coast Guard is a maritime, military, multi-mission service unique among the U.S. military branches for having a maritime law enforcement mission and a federal regulatory agency mission as part of its mission set. It operates under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security during peacetime, and can be transferred to the U.S. Department of the Navy by the U.S. President at any time, or by the U.S. Congress during times of war. This has happened twice: in 1917, during World War I, and in 1941, during World War II.

Contents

World War II Contribution

LST-167 participated in the advances of Operation Cartwheel in the Solomon Islands after the success of the Guadalcanal Campaign in February 1943.

Operation Cartwheel

Operation Cartwheel (1943–1944) was a major military operation for the Allies in the Pacific theatre of World War II. Cartwheel was an operation aimed at neutralising the major Japanese base at Rabaul. The operation was directed by the Supreme Allied Commander in the South West Pacific Area (SWPA), General Douglas MacArthur, whose forces had advanced along the northeast coast of New Guinea and occupied nearby islands. Allied forces from the Pacific Ocean Areas command, under Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, advanced through the Solomon Islands toward Bougainville. The Allied forces involved were from Australia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the US and various Pacific Islands.

Guadalcanal Campaign U.S. military campaign in World War II

The Guadalcanal Campaign, also known as the Battle of Guadalcanal and codenamed Operation Watchtower by American forces, was a military campaign fought between 7 August 1942 and 9 February 1943 on and around the island of Guadalcanal in the Pacific theater of World War II. It was the first major offensive by Allied forces against the Empire of Japan.

Beginning on 15 August 1943, LST-167 supported the landing for the taking of Vella Lavella.

On 25 September 1943, while beached at the previously unused Ruravai Beach, she was struck by 2 enemy bombs and destroyed by ensuing fires and explosions. After being towed to Rendova, the ship was evaluated and declared economically unsalvageable. [1]

In addition to 1 officer and 19 enlisted men wounded, 2 officers and 8 enlisted men were killed as a result of the attack. 5 others were missing in action. The destruction of LST-167 caused the greatest loss of life aboard a Coast Guard vessel during World War II. [2]

Related Research Articles

USCGC <i>Tamaroa</i> (WMEC-166)

USCGC Tamaroa (WAT/WMEC-166), originally the United States Navy Cherokee-class fleet tugUSS Zuni (ATF-95), was a United States Coast Guard cutter. Following the U.S. Coast Guard custom of naming cutters in this class of ship after Native American tribes, she was named after the Tamaroa tribe of the Illiniwek tribal group.

SPARS

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) Women's Reserve, known as the SPARS, was the World War II women's branch of the USCG Reserve. It was established by the United States Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on 23 November 1942. This authorized the acceptance of women into the reserve as commissioned officers and at the enlisted level, for the duration of the war plus six months. Its purpose was to release officers and men for sea duty and to replace them with women at shore stations. Dorothy C. Stratton was appointed director of the SPARS, with the rank of lieutenant commander and later promoted to captain. She had been the Dean of Women on leave from Purdue University, and an officer in the WAVES. Stratton is credited with creating the nautical name of SPARS.

USS <i>LST-325</i>

USS LST-325 is a decommissioned tank landing ship of the United States Navy, now docked in Evansville, Indiana, USA. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS <i>Samuel Chase</i> (APA-26)

USS Samuel Chase (APA-26), launched as SS African Meteor, was an Arthur Middleton class attack transport manned by the United States Coast Guard during World War II. She was named after Samuel Chase, a signatory to the Declaration of Independence.

USS <i>LST-494</i>

USS LST-494 was a U.S. Navy amphibious tank landing ship that saw combat during World War II in both the European and Pacific Theaters of War. LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank.

USS <i>LST-288</i>

USS Berkshire County (LST-288) was an LST-1-class tank landing ship built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for Berkshire County, Massachusetts, she was the only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name.

USS <i>LST-504</i>

USS LST-504 was an LST-491-class tank landing ship built for the United States Navy during World War II. Renamed USS Buchanan County (LST-504) for counties in Iowa, Missouri, and Virginia on 1 July 1955, she was the only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name.

USS <i>Biscayne</i>

USS Biscayne (AVP-11), later AGC-18, was a United States Navy Barnegat-class seaplane tender in commission as a seaplane tender from 1941 to 1943 and as an amphibious force flagship from 1943 to 1946. She saw service during World War II. Transferred to the United States Coast Guard after the war, she was in commission as the Coast Guard cutter USCGC Dexter (WAGC-385), later WAVP-385 and WHEC-385, from 1946 to 1952 and from 1958 to 1968.

USS <i>LST-19</i>

USS LST-19 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used exclusively in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II and manned by a United States Coast Guard crew. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS <i>LST-16</i>

USS LST-16 was a LST-1-class tank landing ship built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. Like most ships in her class, she was not named and was known only by her designation. She was manned by a U.S. Coast Guard crew throughout her service career.

USS LST-247 was a tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS <i>LCI(L)-93</i>

USS LCI(L)-93 was an amphibious assault ship, commissioned in 1943 by the United States Coast Guard. It participated in the Operation Husky Landings in Sicily on 10 July 1943, as well as the landings at Salerno, Italy.

Tongue Point Naval Air Station

Tongue Point Naval Air Station is a former United States Navy air station which was located within the former U.S. Naval Station Tongue Point Astoria, Oregon

LST-420 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship that was transferred to the Royal Navy during World War II. She was lost on 7 November 1944, after hitting a mine in heavy seas off Ostend, Belgium, sinking with great loss of life, particularly amongst her Royal Air Force passengers. It was the greatest loss of life on a British landing craft during World War II.

USS <i>LST-18</i>

USS LST-18 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used exclusively in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II and manned by a United States Coast Guard crew. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS <i>LST-20</i>

USS LST-20 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used exclusively in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II and manned by a United States Coast Guard crew. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS <i>LST-22</i>

USS LST-22 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used exclusively in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II and manned by a United States Coast Guard crew. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS <i>LST-23</i>

USS LST-23 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used exclusively in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II and manned by a United States Coast Guard crew. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS <i>LST-27</i>

USS LST-27 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used exclusively in the Europe-Africa-Middle East Theater during World War II and manned by a United States Coast Guard crew. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

References

  1. http://www.uscg.mil/history/WEBCUTTERS/LST_167.pdf
  2. http://www.uscg.mil/history/articles/GilbertsWWII.asp