Unemployment in Scotland

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Unemployment in Scotland measured by the Office of National Statistics show unemployment in Scotland at 155,000 (5.6%) as of August 2015. [1]

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Statistics

As of August 2015: [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Unemployment in Scotland down" (Press release). UK Government. 13 August 2015. Retrieved 19 June 2016.