United States Marine Corps Criminal Investigation Division

Last updated
United States Marine Corps
Criminal Investigation Division
USMC CID badge.jpg
Badge design of the United States Marine Corps Criminal Investigation Division
AbbreviationUSMC CID
Agency overview
EmployeesApprox. 300
Jurisdictional structure
Federal agency United States
Operations jurisdiction United States
General nature
Operational structure
Special Agent Federals300 (approx.)
Parent agency United States Marine Corps Law Enforcement Branch

The United States Marine Corps Criminal Investigation Division (USMC CID) is a federal law enforcement agency that investigates crimes against people and property within the United States Marine Corps.

Contents

Selection and training

CID Agent candidates must be currently serving as an enlisted active duty Marine between the grades of E-5 through E-9 or WO1 to CWO5. Civilian CID Agents must be employed in the government schedule (GS) 1811 series as a criminal investigator. All CID Agents must be able to obtain and maintain a Top Secret security clearance. Marine candidates must possess a GT score of 110 or higher, have normal color vision. Both Marine and civilian agents must meet Marine Corps physical fitness standards. Prospective Marine Corps CID agents are sent to the U.S. Army Military Police Schools (USAMPS) to attend the U.S. Army CID Special Agent Course (CIDSAC) at Fort Leonard Wood, MO, and must complete six months on-the-job training. Civilian CID agents either attend CIDSAC, or the Criminal Investigative Training Program (CITP) at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) at Glynco, GA. Marine Corps CID agents may later return to USAMPS or FLETC to attend advanced or specialized training as may be directed.

Responsibility

CID is responsible for: [1]

USMC CID investigates misdemeanors and felonies of the Uniform Code of Military Justice and United States Code. [2]

Uniform

Special Agents typically dress in professional business attire. Due to the nature of their work, undercover assignments and field work will typically dictate their attire.

Firearms

CID Agents are issued the standard Glock 19M 9mm pistol as of 2017. [3] Previously CID Agents carried the Sig Sauer P228.

See also

JAG Corps

Intelligence

Other

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References

  1. "CID page at MCB Quantico". marines.mil.
  2. "CID page at 29 Palms Provost Marshal's Office". 29palms.usmc.mil.
  3. http://www.hqmc.marines.mil/Portals/135/JAO/MCO%205500.6H%20Arming%20of%20Law%20Enforcement%20and%20Security%20Personnel%20and%20the%20Use%20o