United States Mint Police

Last updated
United States Mint Police
Patch of the United States Mint Police.png
Patch of the U.S. Mint Police
Flag of the United States Department of the Treasury.png
Flag of the U.S. Department of the Treasury
Common nameMint Police
AbbreviationUSMP
Agency overview
Formed1792
Jurisdictional structure
Federal agency United States
Operations jurisdiction United States
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
Agency executives
Parent agency United States Mint
Offices
Website
www.USMint.gov

The United States Mint Police (USMP) is a U.S. federal law enforcement agency responsible for the protection of the U.S. Treasury and the U.S. Mint. In 2004 they employed 376 police officers. [1]

Contents

History

The United States Mint Police was founded in 1792, making it one of the oldest federal law enforcement agencies in the United States. [2]

Official duties

The Mint Police is responsible for protecting over $300 billion in Treasury and other government assets stored in U.S. Mint facilities in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, Fort Knox, and West Point. [3] The Mint Police also safeguards over 2,800 U.S. Mint employees. [2] In addition, the United States Mint Police have guarded the U.S. Constitution; the Gettysburg Address; and from World War II to 1978, the Holy Crown of Hungary. Its scope has increased over the years, and it now trains with local law enforcement and has bicycle patrols throughout cities. [3]

Recently, the Mint Police have "participated in security details at a variety of non-Mint-related events, including two presidential inaugurations, the Kentucky Derby, 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, and an International Monetary Fund/World Bank Conference." [3] It also assisted with Hurricane Katrina, protecting the New Orleans branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and participating in relief efforts. [3]

Fallen officer

Since the establishment of the United States Mint Police, one officer has died in the line of duty. [4]

OfficerDate of deathDetails
Police Officer Ted Marvin Shinault
20 September 2005
Motorcycle accident

See also

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References

  1. Brian A. Reaves (July 2006). "Federal Law Enforcement Officers, 2004" (PDF). Bureau of Justice Statistics. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-08-26.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. 1 2 United States Department of the Treasury. The United States Mint Police. Last accessed 29-02-2008.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Bailer, Bryn. Departments: A Closer Look at the United States Mint Police. Police: The Law Enforcement Magazine, December 2006. Last accessed 14-09-2017.
  4. "United States Department of the Treasury - United States Mint Police, U.S. Government, Fallen Officers". The Officer Down Memorial Page (ODMP).