2003 FIFA Women's World Cup

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2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003
2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.svg
Official logo
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
Dates20 September – 12 October
Teams16 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)6 (in 6 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Germany.svg  Germany (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Third placeFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Fourth placeFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Tournament statistics
Matches played32
Goals scored107 (3.34 per match)
Attendance656,789 (20,525 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz (7 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz
1999
2007

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by Germany. [1] They won their first women's world title and became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup. The men's team had won the World Cup three times at the time.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

FIFA World Cup association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

Contents

The tournament was originally scheduled for China from 23 September to 11 October. On 3 May 2003, FIFA announced that they would move the tournament to an alternate host country because of the 2003 SARS outbreak in China. At the same time the FIFA announced that the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup would be awarded to China in its place. [2] [3] On 26 May 2003, FIFA announced the United States would host the tournament. Because the United States had hosted the 1999 World Cup, it was thought the United States could best organize the tournament in the little time remaining before the October scheduled start. In addition, women's soccer boosters in the United States hoped that interest generated by the tournament would save the U.S. women's professional league, the Women's United Soccer Association, from folding. [4]

2007 FIFA Womens World Cup 2007 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

Womens United Soccer Association

The Women's United Soccer Association, often abbreviated to the WUSA, was the world's first women's soccer league in which all the players were paid as professionals. Founded in February 2000, the league began its first season in April 2001 with eight teams in the United States. The league suspended operations on September 15, 2003, shortly after the end of its third season, after making cumulative losses of around US $100 million.

In compensation for losing the tournament, China retained its automatic qualification as host, and was named as host for the 2007 event. [4] [5] [6] [7]

Mostly due to the rescheduling of the tournament on short notice, FIFA and the United States Soccer Federation were forced to creatively schedule matches. Nine doubleheaders were scheduled in group play (similar to the 1999 format). They also had to abandon the modern practice of scheduling the final matches of the group stage to kick off simultaneously. In Groups A and D, the final matches were scheduled as the two ends of a doubleheader. The final matches in Groups B and C were also scheduled as doubleheaders, but split between two cities, with a Group B match in each city followed by a Group C match. The four quarterfinals were also scheduled as two doubleheaders, and both semifinals were also a doubleheader. [8]

United States Soccer Federation official governing body of soccer in the United States

The United States Soccer Federation (USSF), commonly referred to as U.S. Soccer, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and the official governing body of the sport of soccer in the United States. With headquarters in Chicago, the FIFA member governs U.S. amateur and professional soccer, including the men's, women's, youth, beach soccer, futsal, and Paralympic national teams. U.S. Soccer sanctions referees and soccer tournaments for most soccer leagues in the United States. The U.S. Soccer Federation also administers and operates the U.S. Open Cup, which was first held in 1914.

Venues

The size and scope of the cup were reduced due to the limited time given to organize the tournament. Giants Stadium in the New York area backed out of hosting after being unable to resolve scheduling issues with the New York Giants. The matches were scheduled in doubleheaders and moved from the East Coast to the West Coast as it progressed. [9]

Giants Stadium former stadium located in East Rutherford, New Jersey

Giants Stadium was a stadium located in East Rutherford, New Jersey, in the Meadowlands Sports Complex. The venue had been open between 1976 and 2010, and it primarily hosted sporting events and concerts in its history. The maximum seating capacity was 80,242. The structure itself was 756 feet (230 m) long, 592 feet (180 m) wide and 144 feet (44 m) high from service level to the top of the seating bowl and 178 feet (54 m) high to the top of the south tower. The volume of the stadium was 64,500,000 cubic feet (1,830,000 m3), and 13,500 tons of structural steel were used in the building process while 29,200 tons of concrete were poured. It was owned and operated by the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority (NJSEA).

New York Giants National Football League franchise in East Rutherford, New Jersey

The New York Giants are a professional American football team based in the New York metropolitan area. The Giants compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, which it shares with the New York Jets in a unique arrangement. The Giants hold their summer training camp at the Quest Diagnostics Training Center at the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

LA Galaxy vs Houston Dynamo- Western Conference Finals panorama.jpg Columbus crew stadium mls allstars 2005.jpg Gillette Dec 08.jpg
Home Depot Center

Location: Carson, California
Capacity: 27,000

Columbus Crew Stadium

Location: Columbus, Ohio
Capacity: 23,000

Gillette Stadium

Location: Foxborough, Massachusetts
Capacity: 22,385

Foxborough, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Foxborough is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States, about 22 miles (35 km) southwest of Boston, 18 miles (29 km) northeast of Providence, Rhode Island and about 73 miles (117 km) northwest of Cape Cod. Foxborough is part of the Boston metropolitan statistical area. The population was 16,865 at the 2010 census.

2003 FIFA Women's World Cup (the United States)
Philly (45).JPG PGEParkpano.jpg RFK Stadium aerial photo, 1988.JPEG
Lincoln Financial Field

Location: Philadelphia
Capacity: 68,500

PGE Park

Location: Portland, Oregon
Capacity: 27,700

Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium

Location: Washington, D.C.
Capacity: 55,000

Teams

Qualifying countries FIFA Womens World Cup 2003.png
Qualifying countries

16 teams participated in the final tournament. The teams were:

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup squads.

Match officials

Draw

The group draw took place at the Home Depot Center in Carson, California on 17 July 2003. [12]

Group stage

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States (H)3300111+109
2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 320153+26
3Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 310234−13
4Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3003011−110

(H): Host

20 September 2003
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg 0–3 Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
21 September 2003
United States  Flag of the United States.svg 3–1 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden RFK Stadium, Washington
25 September 2003
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 1–0 Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
United States  Flag of the United States.svg 5–0 Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
28 September 2003
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 3–0 Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
North Korea  Flag of North Korea.svg 0–3 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 321082+67
2Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3201105+56
3Flag of France.svg  France 311123−14
4Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg  South Korea 3003111−100
20 September 2003
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 2–0 Flag of France.svg  France Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
21 September 2003
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg 3–0 Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg  South Korea RFK Stadium, Washington
24 September 2003
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 1–4 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil RFK Stadium, Washington
France  Flag of France.svg 1–0 Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg  South Korea RFK Stadium, Washington
27 September 2003
South Korea  Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg 1–7 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Gillette Stadium, Foxborough
France  Flag of France.svg 1–1 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil RFK Stadium, Washington

Group C

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3300132+119
2Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 320175+26
3Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 310276+13
4Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 3003115−140
20 September 2003
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 4–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
Japan  Flag of Japan.svg 6–0 Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
24 September 2003
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 3–0 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 3–0 Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
27 September 2003
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 3–1 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Gillette Stadium, Foxborough
Argentina  Flag of Argentina.svg 1–6 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany RFK Stadium, Washington

Group D

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 321031+27
2Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 320152+36
3Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 310225−33
4Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 301235−21
21 September 2003
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1–2 Flag of Russia.svg  Russia The Home Depot Center, Carson
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1–0 Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana The Home Depot Center, Carson
25 September 2003
Ghana  Flag of Ghana.svg 0–3 Flag of Russia.svg  Russia The Home Depot Center, Carson
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1–1 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia The Home Depot Center, Carson
28 September 2003
Ghana  Flag of Ghana.svg 2–1 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia PGE Park, Portland
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1–0 Flag of Russia.svg  Russia PGE Park, Portland

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
1 October — Foxborough
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1
 
5 October — Portland
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0
 
2 October — Portland
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 7
 
12 October — Carson
 
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 1
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany (a.e.t.) 2
 
1 October — Foxborough
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1
 
5 October — Portland
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2
 
2 October — Portland
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1 Third place
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0
 
11 October — Carson
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3
 
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1
 

Quarter-finals

United States  Flag of the United States.svg1–0Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 24' Report
Attendance: 25,103
Referee: Nicole Petignat (Switzerland)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg1–2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Marta Soccerball shade.svg 44' (pen.) (Report) Svensson Soccerball shade.svg 23'
Andersson Soccerball shade.svg 53'
Attendance: 25,103
Referee: Zhang Dongqing (China)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg7–1Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Müller Soccerball shade.svg 25'
Minnert Soccerball shade.svg 57'
Wunderlich Soccerball shade.svg 60'
Garefrekes Soccerball shade.svg 62', 85'
Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 80', 89'
(Report) Danilova Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Attendance: 20,021
Referee: Im Eun-ju (Korea)

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg0–1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
(Report) Hooper Soccerball shade.svg 7'
Attendance: 20,021
Referee: Kari Seitz (United States)

Semi-finals

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–0Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Garefrekes Soccerball shade.svg 15'
Meinert Soccerball shade.svg 90+1'
Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 90+3'
(Report)
Attendance: 27,623
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg1–2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Lang Soccerball shade.svg 64' (Report) Moström Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Öqvist Soccerball shade.svg 86'
Attendance: 27,623
Referee: Katriina Elovirta (Finland)

Third place play-off

United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Boxx Soccerball shade.svg 51'
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 80'
(Report) Sinclair Soccerball shade.svg 38'
Attendance: 25,253
Referee: Tammy Ogston (Australia)

Final

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Meinert Soccerball shade.svg 46'
Künzer Soccerball shade gold.svg 98'
(Report) Ljungberg Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Attendance: 26,137

Awards

The following awards were given for the tournament: [13]

Golden BallSilver BallBronze Ball
Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz Flag of Sweden.svg Victoria Svensson Flag of Germany.svg Maren Meinert
Golden ShoeSilver ShoeBronze Shoe
Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz Flag of Germany.svg Maren Meinert Flag of Brazil.svg Kátia Cilene
7 goals4 goals4 goals
FIFA Fair Play Award
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR

All-star team

GoalkeeperDefendersMidfieldersForwards

Flag of Germany.svg Silke Rottenberg

Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Wang Liping
Flag of Germany.svg Sandra Minnert
Flag of the United States.svg Joy Fawcett

Flag of Germany.svg Bettina Wiegmann
Flag of Sweden.svg Malin Moström
Flag of the United States.svg Shannon Boxx

Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Charmaine Hooper
Flag of Germany.svg Maren Meinert
Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz
Flag of Sweden.svg Victoria Svensson

Goal scorers

Birgit Prinz of Germany won the Golden Shoe award for scoring seven goals. In total, 107 goals were scored by 56 different players, with only one of them credited as own goal.[ citation needed ]

7 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goal

Tournament ranking

Teams outside of the top four were ranked by points gained across all matches. Goal differences were used thereafter. [14]

RankTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6600254+2118
2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 6402107+312
3Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6501155+1015
4Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 6303101009
Eliminated in the quarter-finals
5Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 421194+57
6Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 421132+17
7Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4202106+46
8Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 420269–36
Eliminated at the group stage
9Flag of France.svg  France 311123–14
10Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 310276+13
11Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 310234–13
12Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 310225–33
13Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 301235–21
14Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg  South Korea 3003111–100
15Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3003011–110
16Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 3003115–140

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References

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  3. Jones, Grahame L. (7 April 2003). "SARS Threatens Staging of Women's World Cup". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 July 2012.
  4. 1 2 Jere Longman (27 May 2003). "SOCCER; U.S. Replaces China As Host of Soccer's Women's World Cup". New York Times. Retrieved 1 November 2012.
  5. Jones, Grahame L. (17 June 2003). "World Cup Leans to the West". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 July 2012.
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  9. Longman, Jere (June 13, 2003). "World Cup To Skip New York". The New York Times . p. D1. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  10. "Match Report". FIFAworldcup.com. Archived from the original on 14 December 2004.
  11. "Match Report". FIFAworldcup.com. Archived from the original on 13 December 2004.
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  13. Awards 2003
  14. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003 – Technical Report" (PDF). FIFA. Retrieved 30 November 2015.