303

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
303 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 303
CCCIII
Ab urbe condita 1056
Assyrian calendar 5053
Balinese saka calendar 224–225
Bengali calendar −290
Berber calendar 1253
Buddhist calendar 847
Burmese calendar −335
Byzantine calendar 5811–5812
Chinese calendar 壬戌(Water  Dog)
2999 or 2939
     to 
癸亥年 (Water  Pig)
3000 or 2940
Coptic calendar 19–20
Discordian calendar 1469
Ethiopian calendar 295–296
Hebrew calendar 4063–4064
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 359–360
 - Shaka Samvat 224–225
 - Kali Yuga 3403–3404
Holocene calendar 10303
Iranian calendar 319 BP – 318 BP
Islamic calendar 329 BH – 328 BH
Javanese calendar 183–184
Julian calendar 303
CCCIII
Korean calendar 2636
Minguo calendar 1609 before ROC
民前1609年
Nanakshahi calendar −1165
Seleucid era 614/615 AG
Thai solar calendar 845–846
Tibetan calendar 阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
429 or 48 or −724
     to 
阴水猪年
(female Water-Pig)
430 or 49 or −723
The Christian Martyrs' Last Prayer, by Jean-Leon Gerome (1883) Jean-Leon Gerome - The Christian Martyrs' Last Prayer - Walters 37113.jpg
The Christian Martyrs' Last Prayer, by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1883)

Year 303 ( CCCIII ) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. It was known in the Roman Empire as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Valerius (or, less frequently, year 1056 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 303 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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Saint George of Lydda Hans Suss von Kulmbach (zugeschr.) - Heiliger Georg.jpg
Saint George of Lydda

Date Unknown

Related Research Articles

Diocletian Roman emperor from 284 to 305

Diocletian was a Roman emperor from 284 to 305. Born to a family of low status in Dalmatia, Diocletian rose through the ranks of the military to become a cavalry commander of the Emperor Carus's army. After the deaths of Carus and his son Numerian on campaign in Persia, Diocletian was proclaimed emperor. The title was also claimed by Carus's surviving son, Carinus, but Diocletian defeated him in the Battle of the Margus.

4th century Century

The 4th century was the time period which lasted from 301 through 400. In the West, the early part of the century was shaped by Constantine the Great, who became the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. Gaining sole reign of the empire, he is also noted for re-establishing a single imperial capital, choosing the site of ancient Byzantium in 330 to build the city soon called Nova Roma ; it was later renamed Constantinople in his honor.

The 300s decade ran from January 1, 300, to December 31, 309.

The 310s decade ran from January 1, 310, to December 31, 319.

Year 305 (CCCV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Valerius. The denomination 305 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 290s decade ran from January 1, 290, to December 31, 299.

The 280s decade ran from January 1, 280, to December 31, 289.

300 Calendar year

Year 300 (CCC) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Valerius. The denomination 300 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 298 (CCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Faustus and Gallus. The denomination 298 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

293 Calendar year

Year 293 (CCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Valerius. The denomination 293 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 287 (CCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Valerius. The denomination 287 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

250 Calendar year

Year 250 (CCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Traianus and Gratus. The denomination 250 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

306 Calendar year

Year 306 (CCCVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Valerius. The denomination 306 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 311 Calendar year

Year 311 (CCCXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Maximinus. The denomination 311 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

320 Calendar year

Year 320 (CCCXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantinus and Constantinus. The denomination 320 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Pope Marcellinus was the bishop of Rome from 30 June 296 to his death in 304. He may have renounced Christianity during Emperor Diocletian's persecution of Christians before repenting afterwards, which would explain why he is omitted from lists of martyrs. He is today venerated as a saint in Catholic and Serbian Orthodox Church.

Galerius Roman emperor from 293 to 311

Galerius was Roman emperor from 305 to 311. During his reign he campaigned, aided by Diocletian, against the Sassanid Empire, sacking their capital Ctesiphon in 299. He also campaigned across the Danube against the Carpi, defeating them in 297 and 300. Although he was a staunch opponent of Christianity, Galerius ended the Diocletianic Persecution when he issued an Edict of Toleration in Serdica in 311.

Diocletianic Persecution Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire

The Diocletianic or Great Persecution was the last and most severe persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. In 303, the Emperors Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius, and Constantius issued a series of edicts rescinding Christians' legal rights and demanding that they comply with traditional religious practices. Later edicts targeted the clergy and demanded universal sacrifice, ordering all inhabitants to sacrifice to the gods. The persecution varied in intensity across the empire—weakest in Gaul and Britain, where only the first edict was applied, and strongest in the Eastern provinces. Persecutory laws were nullified by different emperors at different times, but Constantine and Licinius' Edict of Milan (313) has traditionally marked the end of the persecution.

Rictius Varus was a Vicarius in Roman Gaul at the end of the 3rd century, around the time of the Diocletianic Persecution. The Roman Martyrology contains many references to the prefect Rixius Varus, who is said to have persecuted hundreds of Christians. In Christian hagiography he later repented and became a Christian martyr himself, and is regarded a Saint in the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches, with his feast day on July 6.

Hripsime third century Christian martyr of Roman origin

Hripsime, also called Rhipsime, Ripsime, Ripsima, Arbsima or Arsema was a martyr of Roman origin; she and her companions in martyrdom are venerated as the first Christian martyrs of Armenia.

References

  1. Vagi, David (2016). Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. Routledge. p. 476. ISBN   978-1-135-97125-0.
  2. "Lu Ji's (261–303) Essay on Literature dated 1544 and 1547". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved January 5, 2020.