Battersea South (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated
Battersea South
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
County County of London, then Greater London
19181983
Number of membersOne
Replaced by Battersea, Tooting
Created from Battersea (abolished and largely succeeded by Battersea North)
Clapham (part of)

Battersea South was a parliamentary constituency, originally in the County of London and later in Greater London. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the UK Parliament (using first-past-the-post voting).

United Kingdom constituencies electoral area in the UK (do not use in P31; use subclasses of this instead)

In the United Kingdom (UK), each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elect one member to a parliament or assembly, with the exception of European Parliament and Northern Ireland Assembly constituencies which are multi member constituencies.

County of London county of England between 1889 and 1965

The County of London was a county of England from 1889 to 1965, corresponding to the area known today as Inner London. It was created as part of the general introduction of elected county government in England, by way of the Local Government Act 1888. The Act created an administrative County of London, which included within its territory the City of London. However, the City of London and the County of London formed separate ceremonial counties for "non-administrative" purposes. The local authority for the county was the London County Council (LCC), which initially performed only a limited range of functions, but gained further powers during its 76-year existence. The LCC provided very few services within the City of London, where the ancient Corporation monopolised local governance. In 1900 the lower-tier civil parishes and district boards were replaced with 28 new metropolitan boroughs. The territory of the county was 74,903 acres (303.12 km2) in 1961. During its existence there was a long-term decline in population as more residents moved into the outer suburbs; there were periodic reviews of the local government structures in the greater London area and several failed attempts to expand the boundaries of the county. In 1965, the London Government Act 1963 replaced the county with the much larger Greater London administrative area.

Greater London County of England

Greater London is a ceremonial county of England that is located within the London region. This region forms the administrative boundaries of London and is organised into 33 local government districts—the 32 London boroughs and the City of London, which is located within the region but is separate from the county. The Greater London Authority, based in Southwark, is responsible for strategic local government across the region and consists of the Mayor of London and the London Assembly. The City of London Corporation is the principal local authority for the City of London, with a similar role to that of the 32 London borough councils.

Contents

It was created for the 1918 general election, when the former Battersea constituency was divided in two and the Clapham constituency was reduced in size, losing both of its Battersea wards of the four in total. Battersea South was abolished for the 1983 general election, when the bulk of its territory was reunited with Battersea North to form a new Battersea seat. The south of its area formed a new Tooting seat.

1918 United Kingdom general election

The 1918 United Kingdom general election was called immediately after the Armistice with Germany which ended the First World War, and was held on Saturday, 14 December 1918. The governing coalition, under Prime Minister David Lloyd George, sent letters of endorsement to candidates who supported the coalition government. These were nicknamed ‘Coalition Coupons’, and led to the election being known as the ‘coupon election’. The result was a massive landslide in favour of the coalition, comprising primarily the Conservatives and Coalition Liberals, with massive losses for Liberals who were not endorsed. Nearly all the Liberal MPs without coupons were defeated, although party leader H. H. Asquith managed to return to Parliament in a by-election.

Battersea (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Battersea is a constituency in the London Borough of Wandsworth represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Marsha De Cordova of the Labour Party.

Clapham (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-1974

Clapham was a borough constituency in South London which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. It was created in time for the 1885 general election then altered in periodic national boundary reviews, principally in 1918, and abolished before the February 1974 general election. In its early years the seat was officially named Battersea and Clapham Parliamentary Borough: No. 2—The Clapham Division.

Boundaries

Battersea South in London 1918-49 BatterseaSouth.png
Battersea South in London 1918-49
A map showing the wards of Battersea Metropolitan Borough as they appeared in 1916 Battersea Met. B Ward Map 1916.svg
A map showing the wards of Battersea Metropolitan Borough as they appeared in 1916
Battersea South in London 1950-74 BatterseaSouth1950.png
Battersea South in London 1950-74

1918-1950: The Metropolitan Borough of Battersea wards of Bolingbroke, Broomwood, St John, Shaftesbury, and Winstanley.

1950-1974: The Metropolitan Borough of Battersea wards of Bolingbroke, Broomwood, Lavender, Nightingale, St John, Shaftesbury, Stormont, and Thornton.

1974-1983: The London Borough of Wandsworth wards of Balham, Earlsfield, Fairfield, Nightingale, and Northcote.

The seat was created by the Representation of the People Act 1918. When seats were redistributed by the Representation of the People Act 1948 the boundaries of the constituency were altered to contain only four wards, and Winstanley ward was transferred to Battersea North. [1] However the wards of the borough were redrawn in 1949 prior to the next general election in 1950. [2] Accordingly, changes were made under the House of Commons (Redistribution of Seats) Act 1949. Of the 16 new wards, eight were included in each of the Battersea North and South constituencies. [3] [4]

Representation of the People Act 1918 United Kingdom legislation

The Representation of the People Act 1918 was an Act of Parliament passed to reform the electoral system in Great Britain and Ireland. It is sometimes known as the Fourth Reform Act. The Act extended the franchise in parliamentary elections, also known as the right to vote, to men aged 21 and over, whether or not they owned property, and to women aged 30 and over who resided in the constituency or occupied land or premises with a rateable value above £5, or whose husbands did. At the same time, it extended the local government franchise to include women aged 21 and over on the same terms as men.

Representation of the People Act 1948 United Kingdom legislation

The Representation of the People Act 1948 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that altered the law relating to parliamentary and local elections. It is noteworthy for abolishing plural voting, including by the abolition of the twelve separate university constituencies; and for again increasing the number of members overall, in this case to 613.

Battersea North was a parliamentary constituency in the then Metropolitan Borough of Battersea in South London. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first-past-the-post voting system.

In 1965 Battersea became part of the London Borough of Wandsworth. This, however made no immediate change to the parliamentary constituencies. It was not until the general election of February 1974 that the constituency boundaries were altered. [5] The Shaftesbury and St John's wards were transferred to Battersea North, while the redrawn constituency incorporated areas previously in the Clapham and Putney seats. These boundaries were used until abolition. [4]

London Borough of Wandsworth Borough in United Kingdom

Wandsworth is a London borough in England, and forms part of Inner London. The local authority is Wandsworth London Borough Council.

February 1974 United Kingdom general election general election

The February 1974 United Kingdom general election was held on the 28th day of that month. The Labour Party led by former Prime Minister Harold Wilson made moderate gains, but was short of an overall majority. The Conservative Party led by incumbent Edward Heath lost 37 seats, but achieved a slightly higher share of the vote than Labour. This resulted in a hung parliament; Heath resigned when he found himself unable to form a coalition, and Wilson became Prime Minister for a second time. Labour won 301 seats, 17 short of a majority.

Putney (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1918 onwards

Putney is a constituency created in 1918 represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2005 by Justine Greening of the Conservative Party.

The constituency was abolished in 1983. Most of its area (Balham, Fairfield and Northcote wards) went to the recreated Battersea seat, with part (Earlsfield and Nightingale wards) passing to Tooting. [5]

Tooting (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1974 onwards

Tooting is a constituency created in 1974 represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2016 by Rosena Allin-Khan, a member of the Labour Party.

Members of Parliament

ElectionMemberParty
1918 Viscount Curzon Conservative
1929 by-election William Bennett Labour
1931 Sir Harry Selley Conservative
1945 Caroline Ganley Labour Co-operative
1951 Ernest Partridge Conservative
1964 Ernie Perry Labour
1979 Alf Dubs Labour
1983 constituency abolished

Election results

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Alf Dubs 13,98445.11
Conservative Wellesley Wallace13,65244.04
Liberal Jennifer Ware2,8029.04
National Front A Perry5611.81
Majority3321.07
Turnout 31,00070.92
Labour hold Swing
General election October 1974: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Ernest Perry 14,28447.84
Conservative Wellesley Wallace11,43338.29
Liberal Jennifer Ware3,97113.3
More Prosperous Britain Thomas Keen1700.57
Majority2,8519.55
Turnout 29,85663.9
Labour hold Swing
General election February 1974: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Ernest Perry 14,43142.55
Conservative Anthony V Bradbury12,77837.68
Liberal G Mulholland5,91917.45
National Front John Clifton7872.32
Majority1,6534.87
Turnout 33,91673.02
Labour hold Swing
General election 1970: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Ernest Perry 10,92549.54
Conservative Ian Norman Samuel9,22741.84
Liberal Raymond Benad1,1835.36
National Front Tom Lamb7163.25
Majority1,6987.7
Turnout 22,05063.57
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Ernest Perry 13,65152.94
Conservative Ian Norman Samuel9,86138.24
Liberal Basil Weekley2,2768.83
Majority3,79014.70
Turnout 72.95
Labour hold Swing
General election 1964: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Ernest Perry 12,25346.84
Conservative Ernest Partridge 10,61540.57
Liberal David Layton 3,29412.59
Majority1,6386.26
Turnout 72.30
Labour gain from Conservative Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: Battersea South [6]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ernest Partridge 14,20348.26
Labour Co-op Geoffrey Rhodes 12,45142.31
Liberal William Broderick Mattinson2,7749.43
Majority1,7525.95
Turnout 78.85
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1955: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ernest Partridge 15,04447.57
Labour Eric Kenneth I Hurst14,36545.42
Liberal Alan Cooper-Smith2.2197.02
Majority6792.15
Turnout 80.60
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1951: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ernest Partridge 17,73150.71
Labour Co-op Caroline Ganley 17,23749.29
Majority4941.41
Turnout 85.61
Conservative gain from Labour Co-op Swing
General election 1950: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Co-op Caroline Ganley 16,14246.30
Conservative Ernest Partridge 15,77445.24
Liberal Clifford Henry Tyers2,9498.46
Majority3681.06
Turnout 85.62
Labour Co-op hold Swing

Election in the 1940s

General election 1945: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Co-op Caroline Ganley 19,27561.53
Conservative Ernest Partridge 12,05038.47
Majority7,22523.06
Turnout 73.04
Labour Co-op gain from Conservative Swing

Election in the 1930s

General election 1935: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Harry Selley 21,26857.3
Labour Herbert Romeril 15,82142.7
Majority5,44714.6
Turnout
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1931: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Harry Selley 27,85766.9
Labour William Bennett 12,82230.8
New Party Leslie Charles Cuming9092.3
Majority15,03536.1
Turnout
Conservative gain from Labour Swing

Election in the 1920s

General election 1929: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Bennett 18,11343.9
Unionist Harry Selley 17,69542.8
Liberal William J. West 5,51613.3
Majority4181.0
Turnout 72.5
Labour hold Swing
1929 Battersea South by-election
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Bennett 11,78945.5
Unionist Harry Selley 11,21343.4
Liberal Vivian Albu 2.85811.1
Majority5762.1
Turnout 25,55757.7
Labour gain from Unionist Swing
Curzon 1923 Curzon.jpg
Curzon
General election 1924: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Francis Curzon 19,58857.7
Labour Albert Winfield 14,37142.3
Majority5,21715.4
Turnout
Unionist hold Swing
General election 1923: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Francis Curzon 14,55852.0-9.5
Labour Albert Winfield 13,44048.0+9.5
Majority1,1184.0-19.0
Turnout
Unionist hold Swing -9.5
General election 1922: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Francis Curzon 17,68561.5-6.7
Labour Albert Winfield 11,05038.5+23.8
Majority6,63523.0-30.5
Turnout
Unionist hold Swing -15.2

Election in the 1910s

Lynch Arthur Alfred Lynch in 1915.jpg
Lynch
General election 1918: Battersea South
PartyCandidateVotes%±
C Unionist Francis Curzon 15,67068.2n/a
Labour Arthur Lynch 3,38314.7n/a
Liberal Joseph William Molden2,2739.9n/a
Independent John Ernest Philip Jenkin*1,6577.2n/a
Majority12,28753.5n/a
Turnout 53.4n/a
Unionist win (new seat)
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

* Jenkin was supported by and possibly the nominee of the local National Federation of Discharged and Demobilized Sailors and Soldiers branch.

The National Federation of Discharged and Demobilized Sailors and Soldiers (NFDDSS) was a British veterans organisation.

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References

  1. Representation of the People Act 1948, (1948, C.65), Schedule 1
  2. Battersea (Wards) Order 1949 (S.I. 1949/552)
  3. The House of Commons (Redistribution of Seats) (No. 2) Order, 1949 (S.I. 1949 No. 1440)
  4. 1 2 F A Youngs Jr., Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol I: Southern England, London, 1979
  5. 1 2 The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1970 (1970 No. 1674)